Manga Review: Dream Fossil

Manga Review: Dream Fossil by Satoshi Kon

Satoshi Kon (1963-2010) was an acclaimed anime director, making a handful of movies (including Paprika) and one television series, Paranoia Agent.   His themes of confusion of dreams and reality, and madness lying just below the surface of society, made his works fascinating.  He also spent some time as a manga creator, creating several stories in the 1980s before going into anime full time as an assistant to Katsuhiro Otomo (Akira).  This volume collects his short works.

Dream Fossil

The lead story is “Carve.”  After a war polluted the old places of habitation, most of humanity moved to “The City”, a haven of high technology.  However, when a minority of humans started developing psychic powers, they were kicked out of The City, and scrape by in the now less toxic old cities.  Sculptor Kei and his female friend/model Ann notice that Specials are starting to disappear from their neighborhood.  Are The City people up to something?

The fifteen stories cover a range of genres.  There’s a couple of baseball stories, some slice of life, a samurai thriller, and some more speculative fiction.  The characters tend towards the realistic, even if the circumstances are often bizarre.

One standout is “Kidnappers”, about a car thief who discovers that he has a small child in the back seat.  He wants to get the kid back to the parents, but doesn’t want to go to jail for swiping the vehicle–and the actual kidnapper is after him too.  The main character is well drawn as a bad person, but one that doesn’t want to be that bad.

There’s also  “Waira”, the samurai thriller I mentioned.  A feudal warlord has been betrayed by his vassal/brother-in-law, his troops massacred, and now he and a handful of surviving followers are fleeing through a mountain forest in the middle of the night.  The brother-in-law and his troops pursue, but their guides warn them that the mountain is haunted by a murderous creature named “Waira.”  Who will survive?  The nature of Waira comes as a bit of a surprise–it’s so out of place that it might as well be supernatural.

I can really spot the Otomo influence in several of these stories.  The art and writing are decent, but Kon doesn’t sparkle here the way he does in his animation work.  A couple of the stories are photocopied from magazine appearances as the original art is lost; this affects the print quality.

The last story in the volume is Kon’s debut work, a two-parter titled “Toriko” (prisoner).  It’s very YA dystopia.  Yuichi, a teenager, lives in a future society ruled by implacable robot police, and in which you must have your identity card ready at all times for any transactions or even just walking down the street at the wrong time.  When he and his friends break curfew, they are remanded to The Center for “rehab” to become “productive citizens.”  Good thing Yuichi managed to snag a weapon!  Downer ending, depending on your point of view.

In addition to a few color pages, there’s also an interview with Susumu Hirawara, a composer who worked with Satoshi Kon on musical scores for the anime projects.  (One last film, Dreaming Machine, is being slowly finished.)

The intended audience varies, a couple would be suitable for young readers, but overall this anthology seems to be seinen (young men’s.)  Several of the stories have lethal violence, there’s some nudity, underaged drinking and smoking, and one story has an attempted rape.

Fans of Satoshi Kon’s other work will want to own this anthology; others will be better served by checking it out via library loan.

Book Review: The Quick and the Dead

Book Review: The Quick and the Dead by Louis L’Amour

When Duncan McKaskel and his wife Susanna decided to move out West with their young son Tom to homestead, they knew there would be dangers and difficulties.  But after their wagon train falls to cholera and the family strikes out on its own, they learn that the pioneer trail has deadlier dangers than anyone ever told them.  In particular, the family runs afoul of a gang of horse thieves.  One of the thieves winds up dead, and the remainder pursue the family.

The Quick and the Dead

You’d think it was a stroke of good fortune that the McKaskels came across Con Vallian, a drifter with detailed knowledge of the plains, who decides to help them along.  Except that Duncan is unsure of Con’s motives…the man seems unduly impressed with Susanna’s good looks.  Are they more in danger from their hunters, or from the man inside their camp?

Louis L’Amour (1908-1988) was one of America’s most popular writers of Western fiction, with 86 novels to his name.  This volume is considered one of his best, and was made into a movie in  1987.

There’s little wasted wordage in this book.  It gallops right along as the long chase continues.  The characterization is sparse; the mystery of Con Vallian’s motivation is not entirely cleared up when the viewpoint switches to him.  Does he have a creepy desire to steal Susanna away from Duncan, or is he just unfamiliar with tactful ways of complimenting a woman?  We can’t be sure for most of the book.

Most of the horse thief gang is clearer about their motivations, but we don’t learn much of their depths.  Some are not as bad as they could be, some just as horrible as advertised, and one (“The Huron”) is a mystery whose thought processes are unknown to the rest of the gang.  Their pursuit gives a tension to the story, even when they are not physically present.

Which brings me to the Native Americans.  An Arapaho hunting party make several appearances in the story, as a possible threat or potential allies.  Con says, “Injuns think different than us, but that doesn’t say they are wrong…just different.”  It’s a fair enough assessment for the time period.

The ending may seem a bit off if you were expecting the last man standing to finish the hunt, but it makes sense with the characters as established.

As expected from the title, there is a lot of violent death in the story.  Otherwise it should be suitable for junior high readers on up.  The 2011 paperback edition I read has a short biography of Mr. L’Amour, and some maps that help place the action.

Recommended to fans of classic Westerns.

Here’s a trailer for the movie version–be aware that the book has no shower scene.

Book Review: Riot Most Uncouth

Book Review: Riot Most Uncouth by Daniel Friedman

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of this review.  No other compensation was offered or requested.

When George Gordon, Lord Byron, was a lad, his father Mad Jack often told him tales of the vrykolakas, immortal beings who fed on the blood of the living.  Now he’s nominally a student of the university at Cambridge, where a young woman has been found murdered and drained of blood.  As both the world’s greatest living poet and England’s greatest expert on vampires, Byron feels that he is the best person to undertake an investigation.  After all, he must also be the world’s greatest criminal investigator!

Riot Most Uncouth

This new mystery novel is loosely based on real life poet and romantic figure Lord Byron (1788-1824).  It blends some actual things that happened (Byron really did have a bear as a pet to thumb  his nose at Cambridge’s “no dogs in student housing” rules) with a fictional murderer on the loose.

Byron makes a fun narrator; he’s vain, self-centered and often drunk enough to miss important details.  On the other hand, he’s fully aware that he is not a good person and is reasonably honest about his character flaws.  We learn the circumstances that shaped him, including his abusive father and being born with a deformed leg–but it’s clear that Byron could have made much better life choices at any time.  Some people may find him too obnoxious as a protagonist.

The neatest twist in the plot is that there are two private investigators that claim they were hired by the murdered girl’s father, who are not working together…and in a mid-book flash forward we learn that the father doesn’t know which of them he actually hired.

Bits of Lord Byron’s poetry are scattered throughout, and are the best writing  in the book.  A word about the cover:  the Photoshopping is really obvious and a bit off-putting.

As mentioned above, Byron’s father is emotionally and physically abusive, there’s a lot of drinking and other drugs, gruesome murders (the corpses are lovingly described), on-screen but not explicit sex  scenes, and some profanity.  Period racism, sexism (Lord Byron himself is especially dismissive of women) and ableism show up in the story and narration.  The ending may be unsatisfying for some readers–Lord Byron has odd standards of justice.

Recommended for Lord Byron fans, and historical mystery readers who don’t mind a protagonist who is more flaws than good points.

Book Review: The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt

Book Review: The Woman Who Would Be King: Hatshepsut’s Rise to Power in Ancient Egypt by Kara Cooney

Hatshepsut lived about 1500 B.C.E. to circa 1458 B.C.E.  The daughter of Thutmose I, she was married to Thutmose II, her half-brother, when he ascended the throne of Egypt.  As the God’s Wife of Amen-Re (king of all the Egyptian gods) and King’s Great Wife (like many kings of the period, Thutmose II had several wives, of which she was the most important), Hatshepsut helped run the country.  But Thutmose II was sickly, and died young.  Hatshepsut had only produced a daughter, and Thutmose III, her nephew and the crown prince, was only a toddler.

The Woman Who Would Be King

Hatshepsut was made regent for the infant king, and seems to have done a good job.  But she realized it would be many years before he was ready to rule, even if he lived, and the Egyptians did not at that time have a word for “queen.”  To keep the country stable, Hatshepsut had to become king.  Even if that meant transforming her public identity to match the masculine image the job seemed to require.

Kara Cooney is an Egyptologist and associate professor at UCLA who has done extensive research on the subject of Hatshepsut, with the result being this book.  According to this volume, early Egyptologists took the destruction of many of Hatshepsut’s statues and the erasure of her name to indicate that she was an usurper who abused her power, fitting a narrative that women are unfit to rule.  But more recent research has shown that the erasure mostly took place a good quarter-century after her death, towards the end of Thutmose III’s reign.

Professor Cooney attempts to build a narrative of Hatshepsut’s life; this is difficult because the ancient Egyptians had a strong tendency not to mention anything personal or negative about their rulers; even regicide was only referred to obliquely.  Plus, of course, most of the records vanishing after a couple of thousand years.  What does seem to emerge from the available information is that Hatshepsut was a competent ruler, faithful to her gods, and adding to the prosperity of her kingdom with many building programs.

She seems to have tried as hard as possible to adapt to the role of king, rather than trying to make the role of king fit her, as seen by her statues slowly taking on more masculine attributes.

Mind, by modern standards, the conquering and enslaving of neighboring countries would be considered a negative character trait.

If there were any difficulties between her and Thutmose III, her co-king, they did not enter the records.  What seems to have prompted her later erasure was that Thutmose III wanted to ensure that the male line of succession was maintained, so rewrote history to make it seem that he had become king immediately after his father with no woman at the helm.

Her chief steward, Senemut, on the other hand, seems to have fallen from grace immediately after Hatshepsut’s death.  The remaining traces of him suggest that he was one of those people who boasts in public about how tight he is with the king, and once she was gone, his enemies made their displeasure known.

There’s a lot of “might” and “maybe” and “probably” in the text here, and the extensive footnotes cover alternative interpretations of the evidence.  This makes the narrative rather dry, and best suited to college-level readers.  There is a chronology of the Eighteenth through Twentieth Dynasties, an (incomplete) family tree of Hatshupset, a center section of black and white photos, a bibliography and index.

One interesting tidbit from the notes:  apparently, the word that would become “Pharaoh” came into use about this time to mean “the person in the palace” for those who didn’t want to use the male “king” for Hatshupset.

This book is recommended to scholars interested in ancient Egypt, and people who want to read about another woman who ruled Egypt besides Cleopatra.

Disclaimer:  I received a free copy of this volume from Blogging for Books for the purpose of this review.  No other compensation is involved or requested.

Book Review: The Big Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories

Book Review: The Big Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories edited by Otto Penzler

I have a fondness for Sherlock Holmes, as I am sure the majority of my readers do.  Unsurprisingly, there has been a ton of Holmes fanfiction over the years.  Pastiches that try to capture the feel of Arthur Conan Doyle’s prose, parodies that make fun of the detective’s odd habits, and weirder works.  This is a collection of such, many done professionally by famous authors.  Thus it might be better described as a big book of Sherlock Holmes-related stories.

The Big Book of Sherlock Holmes Stories

There’s an editorial introduction, and the book proper begins with an essay by Arthur Conan Doyle regarding how and why he created Sherlock Holmes, and why he killed the character off.  (The essay being written before he brought the detective back.)  Interestingly, he mentions that the “arc” of a dozen individual stories designed to be collected into a book was an innovation at the time–most of the magazine authors aiming for book publication went with serialized stories.  Then there are two short pieces by Doyle being silly with his own creations.

There are over eighty stories all together, most quite short.  They range in time from the very first Holmes parody “An Evening with Sherlock Holmes” by J.M. Barrie (an obnoxious know-it-all engages in dueling observation with Mr. Holmes) to the very recent “The Case of Death and Honey” by Neil Gaiman (Holmes goes to China to solve one last mystery.)  Several stories crossover with other fictional characters (three times with jewel thief Raffles) or real life people.  Arthur Conan Doyle appears several times, but others range from U.S. President William McKinley to John Merrick, the “Elephant Man.”

There are stories as well, about Sherlockians (fans of the stories)solving mysteries, the most unusual of which is “The Martian Crown Jewels” by Poul Anderson  (a Martian detective investigates the theft of the title gems.)

The selection process heavily favored stories that are historically important or are by famous writers; this means that several of the tales are not of good quality.  “Sherlock Holmes and the Dasher” by the normally excellent A.B. Cox is particularly dreadful.  Most of the bad stories are extremely short.  Some of the stories are frequently reprinted (there’s a section of them towards the front), while others are rare.

There’s period sexism and ethnic prejudice in some of the stories.  “The Marriage of Sherlock Holmes” by Gregory Breitman is particularly bad on the sexism front for purposes of humor; it fell flat for me.  Suicide appears more than once, although some of them are actually murders.

The volume concludes with “The Adventure of the Marked Man”by Stuart Palmer (a Cornish man receives death threats, but he hasn’t an enemy in the world…right?)

Most of the stories are good, but due to the uneven nature of this anthology, I recommend it primarily for dedicated Sherlock Holmes fans who will appreciate the rare tales.  Others should use the library, and borrow the volume to read the stories by authors they like.  (I especially recommend the “Modern Victorians” section for casual fans.)

 

 

Manga Review: Rin-Ne Volume 18

Manga Review: Rin-Ne Volume 18 by Rumiko Takahashi

Recap:  Rinne Rokudo is a shinigami (“death spirit”) a psychopomp who helps ghosts and spirits move on to the afterlife.  Because he’s part human, his powers are relatively weak, and he must rely on often expensive gadgets to do his job.  That, and debts his deadbeat dad Sabato saddled him with, means that Rinne lives in poverty.  He’s assisted by his black cat spirit servant Rokumon, and Sakura Mamiya, a girl who can see spirits but is otherwise normal.

Rin-Ne Volume 18

As often happens with Takahashi works, the cast has grown quite large, and the volume opens with several of the black cat servants participating in a mushroom hunt.  Rokumon, with his “get rich quick” mentality, decides to take on the most lucrative (and dangerous) mushrooms in the forest.  Hilarity ensues.

The stories this time are set in winter, and a two-parter concerns a year-end bonus envelope to also poverty-stricken Renge Shima from Sabato, the president of the  damashigami (trickster spirits who try to take human souls early) company she’s been reduced to working for.  Unfortunately, it seems that Sabato got the contents of the envelope by robbing the Life Span Administrative Bureau, and Renge doesn’t want Kain, the handsome LSAB agent, to know she’s working for the bad guys.  Hilarity ensues.

Another two-parter features Tamako, Rinne’s grandmother (also a shinigami.)  She’s invited Rinne and Sakura over to help clean the junk out of some rooms.    In the process, we learn that Rinne was amazingly average as a child, but his father was a delinquent in middle school.  And then they find Kuroboshi (Black Star), Tamako’s black cat servant, trapped in one of the closets (for years!)

The second part has Kuroboshi try to retire by passing his job down to his grandson Sansei Kuroboshi (Black Star the Third).  But while getting some training from Rinne, it’s learned that Sansei has a crippling fear of ghosts–not a good thing when your job involves hunting ghosts!

There are several other one-shots, and the volume concludes with narrow-minded devil Masato playing a mean trick on Rinne using a box made from the ice of Cocytus (a reference to Dante’s Divine Comedy.)  Masato’s petty-minded evil means he has made some mistakes that will come back to bite him.

While the individual stories are funny, this volume feels like it’s marking time; there’s no forward momentum here.  There’s quite a bit of slapstick violence.

There’s also an animated series of this now, so that might be worth looking up.

 

Movie Review: Bender’s Game

Movie Review: Bender’s Game

Futurama was a science-fiction cartoon created by Matt Groening (The Simpsons) for the Fox Broadcasting Company.   It starred Philip J. Fry, a New York City pizza delivery worker who is “accidentally” cryogenically frozen for a thousand years.  In the bizarre future world, Fry has trouble fitting in at first, but quickly becomes employed by his distant descendant, eccentric scientist Hubert J. Farnsworth, as a delivery person for one-ship operation Planet Express.

Bender's Game

Fry befriends vice-ridden robot Bender and violence-prone cyclops Leela, who join him at the delivery company.  Other employees include fussy bureaucrat Hermes, naive intern Amy, completely incompetent lobster doctor Zoidberg and Scruffy the janitor.  They went on to have many comedic adventures on network TV from 1999 to 2003.

The Fox executives never particularly liked Futurama, despite or perhaps because of its critical acclaim, so the scheduling was erratic at best.  Eventually, it was not so much cancelled as not scheduled for a year.   A couple of years later, Comedy Central picked the show up for syndication, and helped fund four direct to DVD movies in 2008, of which Bender’s Game is the third.

In one plotline, Bender learns to play the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons™ which is a bit difficult for him as he has never really used his imagination before.  He makes a breakthrough, but it turns out that as a robot, his imagination gets the better of him, making him delusional, living in a fantasy world based on the campaign.  Bender is institutionalized.

In the other main plotline, the price of “dark matter” fuel is skyrocketing due to a purported shortage.   Leela’s pet Nibbler (actually a superintelligent being) produces dark matter as excrement, which helps.  But evil corporate mogul Mom owns the only dark matter mine and her monopoly allows her to set any price she wants.  Professor Farnsworth reveals that he has a method to break Mom’s monopoly, but it can only be done inside the mine itself.

The two plotlines combine when dark matter inside Bender is stimulated by…events…and his imagination transforms the world into his fantasy adventure.  The situation in that world is a twisted mirror of the previous events, and the transformed Planet Express crew must fulfill their quest lest the universe fall to darkness!  Oh, and there’s a surprise revelation about one of the minor characters.

It’s obvious the writers and voice actors had a ball making this, with all the D&D references and other pop-culture bits (Ender’s Game is not referenced beyond the title.)   While it will help to have seen some episodes of the series before, the loose continuity of Futurama should allow most viewers to catch on quickly.  Past events that are important are referenced in the movie itself.

The movie is designed to split into four episodes for showing in syndication, and it’s pretty obvious where the transitions are supposed to take place.

If you are new to the series, you should be aware that cartoon nudity crops up every so often, and all the characters will turn into jerks whenever it’s convenient for a joke.  (Bender is almost always a jerk.)  One thing I wasn’t too keen on is that this movie leans heavily on potty humor, well beyond what is called for by the plot.

After the movies, there was another season of regular episodes, but then the show was canceled again so it may not be coming back.

Recommended for anyone who’s ever played Dungeons & Dragons™.

 

 

Manga Review: Vinland Saga Book Seven

Manga Review: Vinland Saga Book Seven by Makoto Yukimura

Quick recap and spoilers for the previous volume:  It is the age of Vikings.  Canute, King of Denmark and (by conquest) England, needs cash to fund his occupation army.  Therefore, he has engineered an incident to force the wealthy Ketil family into outlawry and seize their lands and property.  Meanwhile, on the Ketil farm, slaves Thorfinn, Einar and Arnheid face the consequences of Gardar’s rampage–Snake and his men are not happy at all.

Vinland Saga Book Seven

Ketil returns home on Leif’s ship, in great emotional distress because of the king’s treachery.  He learns of Gardar’s attempt to rescue Arnheid (Gardar’s wife and Ketil’s slave) and reacts by beating Arnheid mercilessly, despite her being pregnant with his child.

Then Canute arrives with his thegns (top warriors) and fearsome Jomsviking mercenaries.  Ketil rallies the farmers who owe him money, but that and his small band of “guests”, veteran fighters though they may be are no match for the royal forces.

Thorfinn could just walk away from all of this, none of these people are saints or innocents, and he has no more obligation to them.  But his new commitment to pacifism as a way of life means he has to at least try to resolve the situation peacefully.

This volume of the long-running manga is filled with scenes of violence, often quite gory.  There are extended sequences of beatings that are painful to look at.  Rape does not occur on panel, but is referred to, and one character threatens it in an attempt to force consent.  There are numerous deaths, including important characters.

There are some lighter moments, however.  Canute and Thorfinn’s meeting after so many years leads to at least a temporary peace.  And chapter 100, the last of the volume, is primarily comedic as Thorfinn returns to Iceland at long last only to have no one recognize him.  There’s some humor derived from the fact that there’s another Thorfinn about the same age in the crew, distinguished by being nicknamed “Bug-Eyes.”

The legendary scene of King Canute ordering the waves to stop is in here, as the young ruler makes a point about his power compared to God’s.

The art and writing continue to be excellent, so if you enjoyed previous volumes, you’ll like this one.

Magazine Review: The Avenger #8: House of Death | The Hate Master

Book Review: The Avenger #8: House of Death | The Hate Master by Kenneth Robeson

Quick recap:  The Avenger, Richard Henry Benson, is a wealthy adventurer who took early retirement to spend time with his wife and daughter.  They were murdered by criminals, and he has sworn vengeance on crimedom, gathering a team of highly skilled people known as “Justice, Inc.”  As mentioned in my review of #7, sales on the title weren’t doing so well, so editorial ordered some changes that removed the Avenger’s weird appearance and retconned his age to be considerably younger, with these changes taking place in Murder on Wheels.

The Avenger #8

This had a direct effect on the first story in this volume, House of Death.  It had originally been finished by Paul Ernst (writing as Kenneth Robeson) under the title “House of Hate.”  But then the editorial decision came down, Murder on Wheels was hastily put in place instead, and this story was stowed away.   Then it was rewritten to change Benson’s appearance to the new look, excise his uncanny face-change ability, and put in a line explaining where the new team member Cole Wilson was.  By that time, the next story also had “Hate” in the title, so this story was retitled.

So, what is House of Death about?  It’s about an once powerful and wealthy family, the Haygars.  Political changes and bad health have whittled away the family’s fortune and numbers, leaving only a handful of cousins from various parts of the world.  They have come to America for a reunion, each bearing a small gold coin to identify themselves.  However, those coins also mark the bearers for death, and at least one of the Haygars is an impostor.

The story has an interesting opening, focusing on Milky Morley, a down on his luck mugger who attacks a man on a lonely street for the “profit” of a wad of bills from a country that doesn’t exist any more, and a small gold coin of no known nation.  He is only the first person in the story to die because he’s touched one of the coins.

Nellie Gray gets to be particularly useful in this story once the scene switches to an island off the coast of Maine.  She brachiates ala  Tarzan, kills a guard dog with an improvised boar spear, and saves the lives of several of the male members of the team.  And if she gets in trouble in the deadly house of the title, it’s because everyone else has had a turn.

The Hate Master, also by Paul Ernst, opens with a scientist disappearing from an isolated laboratory by unknown means.  Then a Scottish terrier is torn to pieces by rabbits.  It’s soon clear that the scientist has developed some means of causing animals and people to hate on command, which may be tied to a wealthy politician who’s running for president.  (Will Murray’s article in this volume claims this was the first appearance of a “hate plague” in the hero pulps.)  There’s an unpleasant scene of the political candidate whipping a dog with a copper wire

Both stories happen to have the gigantic Smitty’s ankles torn up by small animals, and have sections set in Maine.

After the two main stories, there are two shorts.  “A Coffin for the Avenger” by Emile Tepperman appeared in Clues Detective, and has the Avenger up against a Nazi spy codenamed “the Black Tulip” after the villain’s horticultural ambitions.  There’s a chilling first bit with a straitjacketed man forced to “drive” a car into a hotel lobby, only one of a series of events the Black Tulip has orchestrated.  The villain boasts that he never overlooks a detail–he’s wrong, and it’s a short story because the Black Tulip’s henchman has failed to notice the neighborhood kids playing games.

“Death Paces the Widow’s Walk” by Bruce Elliott stars detective Nick Carter (see the review I did of one of his books) investigating an apparent suicide on Martha’s Vineyard.  The suicide note is an obvious forgery, and the most likely suspect, the man with bald nostrils, has vanished.  It’s a double “locked room mystery” and Nick cuts the solution very close to his own death.

While not quite up to the earlier stories in the series, these Avenger tales have some great plot twists and exciting action.  Recommended to pulp fans.

Book Review: The Princess and the Pony

Book Review: The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton

Princess Pinecone lives in a warrior kingdom, and wants to be a warrior herself.  But instead of getting swords or plate armor for her birthdays, she always gets comfy sweaters instead.  This year, Pinecone has made it very clear that she wants a warhorse, a fearsome destrier to ride into battle.  Her parents…don’t exactly give her that.  Pinecone’s new pony is too small and cuddly, and it farts too much.  Hardly what she was hoping for.

The Princess and the Pony

But there is more to a warrior than just fearsomeness, and the pony has its own fine qualities that Pinecone learns to appreciate.

Kate Beaton is the creator of the Hark! A Vagrant webcomic, which is known for its humorous take on history and literature.  However, one of the most popular recurring characters is the Fat Pony*, which is adorably unlike the graceful and powerful horses seen elsewhere in the strip.  So it’s only natural that the pony has been spun off into its own children’s book.

*Note that the word “fat” is nowhere in this book.  It’s also good on the representational front, with warriors of many shapes, sizes and skin tones.

The art is fun (look for all the background details) and the vocabulary is suitable for young readers (one or two words might need an explanation from Mom or Dad.)   The lesson of the book is one that a lot of children’s books already cover, but it’s done in a nicely humorous fashion.

Recommended to families with small children that like ponies and warriors, and Kate Beaton fans.

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