Magazine Review: Lapham’s Quarterly: Spring 2015 Swindle & Fraud

Magazine Review: Lapham’s Quarterly: Spring 2015 Swindle & Fraud Edited by Lewis H. Lapham

Mr. Lapham’s literary magazine is based on the principle that history has much to teach the present on many subjects, so presents excerpts from many famous (and not so famous) authors on a loose topic for the education and entertainment of its readers.  This issue covers swindle & fraud, and the topic of lying and stealing more generally.

Lapham;s Quarterly Spring 2015

The pieces are all short, none more than six pages, and most hanging around the two-three page mark.  A long time spectrum is covered, from the classic Trojan Horse gag to the sub-prime mortgage bubble of the 2000s.   After a lengthy editor’s introduction, we start with Lawrence Osborne buying his own death certificate.  Through many authors we proceed to Oscar Wilde’s short play “The Decay of Lying.”Along the way we hear from Charles Ponzi (his original scheme was legal, but he couldn’t raise money for it without resorting to fraud) and Malcolm X’s thoughts on how white politicians lie to black people to get their votes.

There are a few original essays to round out the issue, “Rogue Wounds” by Daniel Mason, on faking illness; “We Buy Broken Gold” by Clancy Martin , on the retail buying of precious metals and gems; and “A Fish Tale” by David Samuels, about Herman Melville and the nature of fiction in Moby Dick.

The issue is profusely illustrated with classic artworks and other depictions of the theme, infographics and short quotes.   Everything is properly attributed, or at least it appears to be.

The general selection of items is high quality, and since they’re short, if a particular piece doesn’t interest you, another one will be along quickly.  It helps that crime and corruption are such interesting topics.  The shortness does however mean that most of the topics are only touched upon in the briefest of terms and you will want to investigate further if a given one interests you.

Highly recommended for strong readers who have limited time at any sitting.

Manga Review: Magi #1

Manga Review: Magi #1 by Shinobu Ohtaka

In a setting not unlike the Middle Eastern tales of the Arabian Nights, there is a boy named Aladdin.   He’s lived in isolation until now, so he doesn’t know much about the outside world, or how society works.  Soon, Aladdin meets a drifter named Alibaba, who’s a poor laborer now, but dreams of conquering a dungeon, a mysterious trap-laden building filled with treasure.

Magi #1

After some difficulties with Alibaba’s current client, the wine merchant Budel, and a run-in with the local slavery laws, Alibaba and Aladdin find themselves with no place to go but the dungeon.  It’s filled with dangers, just as described, but more dangerous may be the rival group of treasure hunters….

This is the manga the previously reviewed anime Magi: The Magical Labyrinth was based on.  (Its sequel, Magi: The Kingdom of Magic is now airing.)   The manga starts with a solo adventure of Aladdin, in which he helps out a caravan; this was skipped in the anime to bring in Alibaba faster, and bits reused after the first storyarc.

Aladdin has a rather annoying breast fetish, and some fanservice comes up throughout.  As mentioned in the anime review, most of the characters are suspiciously pale-skinned for the Middle East setting and being out in the sun all the time.

That said, it’s a fun series that will later have a really interesting female character, Morgiana (she appears in this volume, but pre-character development.)

This will mostly appeal to fans of the anime, but might be worth looking into if you’re a fan of Arabian Nights style fantasy.

Anime Review: Magi – Labyrinth of Magic

Anime Review: Magi – Labyrinth of Magic

Based on the manga by Shinobu Ohtaka, Magi is a 24-episode anime series currently streaming subtitled on the Crunchyroll website.  It’s set in an Arabian Nights-influenced world with djinn and other trappings of the genre.  Young Aladdin was raised in an isolated temple with no human contact for as long as he can remember, and is thus new to the outside world.  Good thing he has a big blue genie to help him out!

magi

In the first episode, Aladdin meets up with Ali Baba, a drifter who dreams of conquering the local “dungeon” (a mysteriously appearing building filled with traps and monsters) as it’s said anyone who survives a dungeon will gain great wealth and cool magic items.  Soon, the pair is exploring the dungeon.  But they’re not the only ones.  The local lord (who’s cruel and a little crazy) and his slaves battle Ali Baba and Aladdin.  One of the slaves, Morgiana, survives and becomes free, later joining our heroes on their adventures.

After some individual adventures, the trio reunites in Ali Baba’s hometown and the main plot kicks in.  The government has become corrupt and someone’s manipulating both it and the rebels to assure that the country is thrown into chaos.

Good points:  There’s plenty of cool fight scenes, the dungeons are inventive and there’s a nice variety of characters on the good guy side.  Sinbad, sailor of the Seven Seas, is particularly nifty.  Morgiana doesn’t get stuck with a cheerleader or damsel in distress role.

Not so good stuff:  For a series taking place in a hot desert area and the main characters spending most of their time outside in the sun, the character designs are suspiciously light-skinned.  Morgiana’s lack of agency in the early episodes may be off-putting for some viewers, we don’t get to see her real personality until episode 6, after which it never goes away again and she has full agency.  (But be aware that episode 6 might be triggery for some viewers for abuse in her backstory.)

Also, most of the bad guys are kind of cardboardy, committing evil acts because, well, they’re evil.  The big exception here is Cassim, Ali Baba’s blood brother.  While he is by no measure a good person, his motivations make sense given his background and circumstances.

Fate is a big theme in the series.  It’s explained that destiny is the force moving events in the direction of a better tomorrow.  But it’s a general trend, and many of the characters suffer great injustice and pain in the process.  The secretive organization Al-Sarmen seeks out these people to empower them to curse their fate and “reverse the flow of destiny.”   However, they have no interest in easing suffering or increasing justice, they just want to return the world to formless chaos.  For some reason.

Overall, the series (which has a hasty conclusion; the manga continues) was enjoyable to watch.  Some of its issues might make it less watchable for certain viewers.

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