Manga Review: Monster Collection: The Girl Who Can Deal with Magic Monsters, Volume 5

Manga Review: Monster Collection: The Girl Who Can Deal with Magic Monsters, Volume 5 by Sei Itoh

Kasche was an apprentice summoner, gifted at bringing magical monsters from where they are to the place she needs them, and controlling them using name magic.  But her recklessness made Kasche less than popular with most of her teachers.  When Lord Duran stole the Encyclopedia Verum, a living book that contains all the knowledge of past summoners, it just so happened that Kasche was the only summoner capable of going after him!

Monster Collection: The Girl Who Can Deal with Magic Monsters, Volume 5

Monster Collection was originally a collectible card game, much like Magic: the Gathering, in which the players are summoners who use monsters to battle for them, each having special powers and weaknesses.  It spawned this manga, a video game (which merged it with a board game mechanic) and an anime adaptation, Mon Colle Knights.  None of these share any continuity.

In this volume, Kasche and her team: human warrior Cuervo, who Kasche has a crush on, lamia sorceress Vanessa, and “spirit animal” Kiki finish up their battle with the fallen angel that had been summoned against them.  It’s at this point that  Shin, a lizard man ally of theirs who might or might not be he Lizard King, reappears.

Turns out the only reason they had enough time to finish that grueling battle is because Shin was distracting the other monster in the area, a high dragon.  None of them feel up to the task of fighting such a powerful creature.

Until, that is, Shin reminds Kasche that she in fact knows the true name of this dragon, as that being had previously sent her a dream asking for help.  If Kasche can free the dragon from Lord Duran’s control, it will be a powerful ally.  So Kasche goes into the spiritual realm to battle Lord Duran’s magical sealing, while the others protect her from a swarm of giant ants summoned by Lord Duran’s servant.  Shin turns out to be able to summon himself, but only other lizard folk.

Kasche is at a severe disadvantage until she realizes there is one category of monster she can summon in the spiritual realm.  But will this demon be her trump card or her doom?

There’s some nice detailed monster and battle art, but the writing is only so-so and the volume is essentially wall-to-wall fights.  There’s relatively little gore; the “mature readers” label comes because Kasche is usually naked on the spiritual plane, complete with nipples.  (There’s also some male nudity on display, particularly in the humorous bonus chapter.)

This one may be hard to find.  CMX was DC Comics’ attempt at creating a manga line, which was mismanaged and quickly folded.  Some of their titles were “rescued” for printing elsewhere, but not this one.

And now, the opening video of Mon Colle Knights, so you can see just how different a treatment it is.

Comic Strip Review: Gunnerkrigg Court, Volume 3: Reason

Comic Strip Review: Gunnerkrigg Court, Volume 3: Reason by Thomas Siddell

After Antimony “Annie” Carver’s mother Surma dies, her father Anthony drops her off at her parent’s alma mater, a strange boarding school called Gunnerkrigg Court.  The court is an enormous place, looking rather like an industrial city, but large portions of it seem to be abandoned…by humans, at least.  There are robots advanced beyond anything in the outside world, bizarre events are commonplace, there’s a creepy forest just across a long bridge students are forbidden to cross, and Annie notices that she’s picked up a second shadow.

Gunnerkrigg Court, Volume 3: Reason

This noted fantasy webcomic has been running since 2005, beginning here (happily, the art style drastically improves over time.)  It’s got an intricate plot with many details planned well in advance.  (For example, in an early strip Antimony tells us it will be two years before she sees her father again.)  The Court’s architecture is somewhat based on the city of Birmingham in England.

At the beginning of this volume, Annie is in training to possibly become the Court’s Medium, an ambassador between the school and the magical Gillitie Wood.  The other two candidates, Andrew Smith (with the ability to bring order out of chaos) and George Parley (whose father expected a boy, and has the gift of teleportation) argue a lot but turn out to be attracted to each other.  This interrupts two simulations.

Then it’s time for a camping trip to a park that is actually inside the boundaries of Gunnerkrigg Court.  Campers start to disappear, and Annie and her best friend Kat (Katherine Donlan, daughter of two of the teachers who were friends with Annie’s parents) must solve the mystery.

After that, Kat, who is beloved by the Court’s robots due to her technical skills and repair abilities grants the king of said robots access to the portrait of Jeanne, the ghost that haunts the ravine between the Court and the Wood.  In return, he reveals the existence of a robot that has memories of Jeanne, and the very early days of the Court.  Those memories reveal a dark secret of the past.

In the next chapter, Annie visits the Wood and learns more about Ysengrim, the wolf with tree armor that is the current Medium for their side of the river.  Coyote, the trickster spirit that is in charge of the Wood, gives Annie a gift for reasons not fully revealed.

Then the subplot of Jack, who’s been acting increasingly erratic since he was exposed to the mass hallucination projected by a girl named Zimmy, comes to the fore.  He coerces Annie into accompanying him to a power station that might have something to do with why he can’t sleep.

This is followed by a spotlight chapter for Kat, who hasn’t been able to process her emotional reaction to learning what the Court did to Jeanne.  She’s finally able to recover her equilibrium with the help of an abandoned baby bird, and Paz, a classmate who can talk to animals.

Further research with the help of Andrew and Parley reveals some of Jeanne’s story from her point of view, and convinces Parley to be honest about her feelings.

Finally, Annie’s second year at Gunnerkrigg Court comes to a painful close when she and Renard (a fox spirit living in a stuffed toy) quarrel and reveal some very painful secrets to each other.  This leads to her choosing to spend the summer in the Wood rather than with friends.

At the end are some art pages and bonus strips about “City Face”, the pigeon Kat rescued.

The mood swings wildly between chapters, some being very comedic while others go deep into dark territory.  While we get several important revelations in this volume, the jigsaw nature of the overall plot means that many items don’t pay off until future volumes–I do recommend starting from the beginning.

As is often the case with webcomics collections, the material is all available on the internet for free, but if you like it, please consider buying the print version to make the creator more financially stable.

Manga Review: Noragami: Stray God #1

Manga Review: Noragami: Stray God #1 by Adachitoka

Mutsumi is in a bad way.   Not only is she under stress studying for the high school entrance exams, but her classmates have turned against her, bullying Mutsumi and encouraging her to self-harm.  She’s locked herself in a toilet stall for a good cry when suddenly she sees a telephone number in the graffiti advertising someone named “Yato” who promises to solve her problems.  Desperate, Mutsumi calls the number.

Noragami: Stray God #1

To her shock, Yato (who appears to be a teenage boy) and his female companion Tomone teleport straight into the girls’ room to discuss Mutsumi’s problem.  It turns out that Yato is a kami (“spirit” or “god”), but he’s at the very bottom of the hierarchy, with no worshipers or space in a shrine, making him a “stray.”  In an effort to increase his visibility and save up cash to buy a place to live, Yato has scribbled his number all over town, and charges five yen (roughly a nickle) for his problem-solving services.  Tomone is Yato’s shinki, a living weapon with a mind of her own.

Unfortunately, Yato isn’t all that bright, and tends to solve problems by cutting them with his sword.  Mutsumi’s problems are partially caused by an ayakashi (hostile spirit) that is amplifying and feeding on the negative emotions caused by exam stress, and cutting that is relatively easy.  But that isn’t the only issue, and how Yato finally solves it disgusts Tomone so much that she quits, leaving Yato weaponless at the end of the first story.

This series ran in Monthly Shounen Magazine in long chapters, so there are only three in this volume.  In the second story, Yato meets Hiyori Iki, a human girl who is a big pro wrestling fan, and due to an act of selfless courage develops the ability/problem of her soul slipping loose from her body.   In soul form, she’s physically powerful, but also very vulnerable, gaining a “tail” that’s actually a link back to her physical body–if it’s cut, she dies!  The third story ends with Yato gaining a new shinki, Yukine, who is decidedly unimpressed with his master.

The name of the series immediately brings to mind the classic 1930s manga Norakuro, about a stray dog that joins a canine-people version of the Imperial Japanese army, learns discipline and valor, and climbs the enlisted ranks.  Little-known in America, it was popular and influential in Japan, with demilitarized versions appearing after World War Two ended.

Noragami is fun adventure-comedy, contrasting Yato’s blunt and sometimes abrasive personality against Hiyori’s naivety and sunniness.  While both of them are eager to help people, Yato is goal-oriented and must be compensated first (even if it is just a nickle) while Hiyori just does it because it’s the right thing to do.  Yukine barely appears in this volume, so a full read on his character is not available here.  The art is decent and conveys the action and mood nicely.

As mentioned, the first story does involve bullying, and there is an element of victim-blaming.  There’s a small amount of incidental fanservice–thankfully, the “camera” does not linger.  And of course there’s a certain amount of fantasy violence.  It should be suitable for junior high readers on up; parents of younger readers should point out why victim-blaming is not useful.

This series was popular enough to get a two-season anime adapation, which I have not seen.   Recommended for fans of shounen fantasy manga.

Book Review: Superheroes

Book Review: Superheroes edited by Rich Horton

Superheroes as we know them more or less started in the comic books of the late 1930s, with the most obvious first “true” superhero being Superman.  And comic books have largely shaped our perceptions of costumed superheroes ever since.  But sometimes prose is a perfectly acceptable way of writing about people with unusual powers and distinctive appearances who fight crime and injustice.  There have been quite a few anthologies of short stories in the field, and this is one of them.

Superheroes

The sixteen stories cover various aspects of the superhero genre, from the superheroes themselves, through supervillains, and to the civilians who have to try to survive in these larger than life worlds.  The lead story is “Sunlight Society” by Margaret Ronald.  A nethead (a cyborg able to interface with computers) is called in to deal with a virus in a superhero base’s computer.  But that’s not all he’s there for, and the information he seeks will cost him dearly.

“Wonjjiang and the Madman of Pyongyang” by Gord Sellar is the story of a South Korean superhero who’s been forced into the role of leader for a multi-national team operating in his homeland and sometimes in neighboring countries.  Unfortunately, politics has freed his North Korean nemesis, budget cuts have gotten Wonjjiang laid off, and our hero’s overbearing mother is pushing him to get married.  (Sadly, the one woman he’s interested in already has a boyfriend.)  One of the more “traditional” superhero stories in the book.

A couple of the stories are of special interest.  “Wild Card” by Leah Bobet is set in the Shadow Unit continuity, about a secret group of government agents that normally battle serial killers who’ve developed super-powers.  Except that this time, the “anomaly” has picked on someone whose personal mythology comes from comic books, and he’s decided to become a full-fledged super-villain.  Somewhat lighter than the usual Shadow Unit story.

Peter S. Beagle (The Last Unicorn) contributes “Dirae.”  Suddenly in the city there’s a woman who appears out of nowhere to save lives like a real-life superhero, then vanishes again until the next rescue.  It’s told from the perspective of that woman as she slowly comes to realize she literally does disappear between those incidents, with no clue where she’s spending the rest of her time, if any.  She tries to work out who she really is and what’s happening to her.  Mr. Beagle is an excellent fantasy writer, and this is one of the best stories in the book.

The weakest story for me was “Secret Identity” by Kelly Link.  A young woman comes to a hotel to meet a man she got to know on the internet; by coincidence (or is it?) there’s a superhero convention going on at the same time.  The secrets she’s been keeping from her prospective lover are compared to a hero’s secret identity.  I didn’t like the main character and found most of the people she interacted with boring.  Overall, a decent collection of 21st Century superhero themed writing.

There’s some vulgar language and sexual situations in the stories, and a couple of them deal with euthanasia.  I’d recommend this to senior high students and up.

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