Manga Review: Showa 1926 1939 a History of Japan

Manga Review: Showa 1926 1939 a History of Japan by Shigeru Mizuki

This is the first volume of Shigeru Mizuki’s  massive history of Japan during the reign of Emperor Hirohito, the “Showa Era,”  It was a long reign, covering most of the Twentieth Century, from 1926-1989.  In addition to the larger story of Japan, it is also his autobiography, as Mizuki’s earliest childhood memories coincide with the beginning of that era.

Showa 1926 1939 a History of Japan

This volume opens several years earlier, with the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 which devastated Tokyo.  The repercussions of this, combined with fiscal mismanagement, created a financial crisis that crippled Japan’s economy.  The optimism and liberalization of the Taisho period took a huge hit.  Japan struggled along until 1929 and the worldwide effects of the Great Depression hit.

A combination of the Red Scare (the belief that Communists were about to take over), military successes and government incompetence led to the rise of right-wing organizations, especially military cliques.  Japan became ever more aggressive against its neighbors in Asia, setting up the puppet state of Manchukuo and grabbing ever more territory from China.

Japan became a rogue state, leaving the League of Nations when that body attempted to intervene in its conquests.  Only Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy recognized Manchukuo, and Japan’s alliance with those nations was about to drag it into World War Two.

This is a “warts and all” history, which covers events that many Japanese schoolkids might not be taught in official classes, or have glossed over for them.  There are many painful topics in here, so despite childish hijinks in the parts dealing with Shigeru’s early life, I would recommend it for senior high school students and up.

Warts and all is also how Mizuki depicts himself as a child and young man.  Naturally athletic but lazy, bright but unmotivated, sensitive but engaging in fights both as part of a gang and solo.  It will take the horrors of war (as depicted in the third volume) to force him into a responsible adult life.  Perhaps he got some of it from his father, who is shown as a Micawber-like optimist despite his economic woes.

There’s a lot of names and dates, so the end-notes are very helpful–you still might want to have Wikipedia open to assist with some of the more obscure bits and to cross-reference what else was going on in the world at the time.  Some bits come across as very dry, making the personal stories a relief.

The art may be jarring for those unused to Mizuki’s style; many pages are drawn directly from photographs in a realistic style, while others are done in a very loose, cartoony fashion.  It’s also kind of weird to have Nezumi-Otoko (Rat-man) as the narrator of the more serious history portion-he would not seem the most reliable of narrators.

Overall, not as interesting as the third volume, which features Shigeru’s most harrowing experiences, but well worth seeking out from the library.

Book Review: The 66 Kid: Raised on the Mother Road

Book Review: The 66 Kid: Raised on the Mother Road by Bob Boze Bell

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

The 66 Kid

Bob Boze Bell has been a rock musician, cartoonist, radio host, magazine publisher and other interesting jobs.  And he spent most of his youth in Kingman, Arizona, where his father had gas stations on Route 66.  This is his memoir of those years.

It’s a coffee table book, lavishly illustrated with photographs and Mr. Bell’s paintings.  Fortunately, he has many family pictures and old clippings to illustrate his anecdotes and historical tidbits.  It’s a fascinating (if possibly biased) look at life in Arizona in the 1950s and 1960s.  Mr. Bell is an accomplished writer, and his prose is excellent.

Note that this is not a comprehensive book about the highway itself; it primarily covers the Kingman area and how Route 66 affected Mr. Bell’s life.

At a suggested retail price of thirty dollars, this book is good value for money if you’re interested in Arizona or Bob Boze Bell.  Others might want to see if their library has it for borrowing, as it is a handsome volume.

Of course, it would be remiss of me to close without a reference to the famous song, so here it is:

Book Review: People Tools for Business

Book Review: People Tools for Business by Alan C. Fox

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.  My copy is an uncorrected galley, and there may be changes in the final product.

People Tools for Business

Alan C. Fox is a successful real estate manager and entrepreneur (and poetry magazine publisher) and previously wrote a book titled People Tools.  That book was a success, so he has written this sequel that focuses on business-related strategies.  It’s divided into fifty short chapters, each with an story or two illustrating the point.

Like many self-help books, some of the advice is obvious, or at least should be, like “show up on time”and “keep a sense of humor.”  Others are a bit more complex, such as the “glass staircase” to overcome the “glass ceiling.”    A few of the chapter titles are directly taken from the author’s personal experience; see if you can guess what situation “Order a Pineapple Fluff” is useful in.

Most of the stories draw from the author’s personal experience, but “Don’t Run Out of Cash” may be more viable for people whose fathers can loan them $6000 to start a business (more in today’s money) than those who have to contemplate selling blood to eat today.  Yes, Mr. Fox did have to let go of some of his three private jets during the last recession, but it’s not quite the same.

That caveat in place, most of the advice in this book is solid, and the short, entertaining chapters make this an excellent book for busy folks such as executives and entrepreneurs.  Consider it as a gift for the business-oriented person in your life.  It goes on sale 9/30/14 as a trade paperback, no word on an audio edition, but I think it would work well that way as well.

Comic Book Review: Persepolis

Book Review: Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

Disclaimer:  I received this book through the Rasmussen College One College, One Book program on the premise that I would review it.

Persepolis

This is the graphic novel memoir of Marjane Satrapi, who was nine years old when her home country of Iran had a revolution and kicked out the Western-backed Shah.  It follows her life from when she was small to about age fourteen, when her parents sent her to school in  Austria for her safety.

As it happens,  her family was far from ordinary, as her great-grandfather had been the Emperor of Persia before he was overthrown by Reza Shah, the father of the Shah that was overthrown in 1979.  Her grandfather had been made Reza Shah’s prime minister, but converted to Communism and was treated as a traitor thereafter.  Even so, the family remained relatively wealthy and influential.

Mari (as she is called in the text) and her parents had high hopes for the 1979 Revolution, hoping it would bring the proletariat to power in a socialist republic.  Instead, the Shi’ite fundamentalists took power, and Iran soon became a very different country.  Worse, the things that the revolutionaries most wanted to change from the old regime, imprisonment of dissidents, torture, assassination, only changed in the persons who did them.

All this has a traumatizing effect on young Mari; she sees friends, relatives and random people she meets suffer great injustice, and feels stifled under the new religious restrictions she must obey, even if they are technically not actually laws.  As if all Iran had happening internally was not enough, Saddam Hussein decided that it would be a good time to invade Iran.

Marjane Satrapi does not depict herself as an entire innocent–Mari lies to inflate her self-importance, says hurtful things, and breaks even fair rules.  She has a rebellious spirit that becomes more dangerous to her as she grows older.

The art is black and white, with much use of large black areas.  The creator is a trained illustrator, and it shows.

Trigger warnings for torture, and for off-panel rape.

Because of the subject matter, this book may not be suitable for children, especially sensitive ones, despite being about a child.  I’d rate it as for older teens and up.  There’s also an animated movie which combines this volume and Marjane Satrapi’s later life, which I have not seen.

This is a book that is valuable for its look into a country many Americans have not heard anything good about in a long time, and a reminder that no culture is monolithic.  There are real people underneath the seemingly united front Iran shows the world.

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