Open Thread: Minicon 52

Open Thread: Minicon 52

I was fortunate enough to attend the 2017 iteration of this venerable science fiction convention thanks to the generosity of another member.  As usual, Minicon was held over Easter weekend at the Bloomington Doubletree (known as the RadiShTree to longtimers.)   This may or may not be the last year at this hotel as the convention committee (concom) is renegotiating the contract.  My new home location made a different bus route seem better, and the trip to the hotel went smoothly, arriving early Friday afternoon.

Minicon 52 Program Guide, cover by Jeff Lee Johnson

I obtained my badge (as a “ghost member” my badge name was “Inky”) and set about catching up with some folks I only meet at these conventions.  These conversations happened off and on during the convention; in other idle moments I read Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Twice Told Tales (see my review in a previous entry.)

The first panel  I attended was “Speaking the Words” about interpretive reading.  I got some advice on dealing with a sore throat from Guest of Honor Mark “Mark Reads” Oshiro.  After that, I went to the Film Room for a documentary about Charles Beaumont, a brilliant but short-lived writer who did some of the best Twilight Zone episodes.  It concentrated almost entirely on his active writing years, only dipping into his early life late in the film for a possible explanation of his health issues.

Opening Ceremonies was fun as usual, but there was a somber moment as we remembered important convention members who had passed on this last year, including the long-time head of Children’s Programming.

Not able to afford a hotel room this year, I got on the bus to return home and rest up for a marathon session the next two days.

Back early Saturday morning, I found a lot of material from past Minicons on the freebie table, including a furry comic guide to Minicon from back when it was one of the largest cons in the Midwest.  Sadly, I am trying to cut down on things I need to store, so I did not pick up any.

I attended the “Lazy Writing” panel (get a beta reader and a professional editor!) and “The Hugo Finalists” panel (voting much more robust and the finalists less controversial this year.)  The “SF and the TV Revolution” panel gave me many suggestions for things I will want to binge watch at some point.

Technical difficulties made the “Trailer Park” event with Fastner & Larson in the Film Room something of a chore; they tried to fill the time with anecdotes, but were often hard to hear.  Once all the hardware and software were talking to each other, the movie trailers were fun to watch.

After that was the “Self Publishing” panel (get a professional editor!) where I put in my two cents as a reviewer who often reads self-published works.  (I should mention that despite my tight budget, I was able to obtain several books at the convention, and reviews will be forthcoming.)  The Jim C. Hines reading and signing completed my official programming interaction for the day.

Art copyright 1964 by Luan Meatheringham
Art copyright 1964 by Luan Meatheringham

I enjoyed the parties, including the Social Media party (formerly the Livejournal party before the latest nonsense chased away many of the members.)  I played a Perry Rhodan-themed game with Richard Tatge,(he won) and then a long bout of Cards Against Humanity in the Seamstresses’ Guild party room (no winners or all winners, depending on how you look at it.)  After that, I watched old MST3K episodes in that room until dawn.

I went to the nearby convenience store to buy an energy drink, only to discover they wouldn’t be open until 8 A.M.!  But the weather outside was brisk enough to dispel some of my grogginess, and I was soon able to get strong tea and breakfast in the consuite.  A big thank you to the Consuite volunteers!

I attended “The Business of Writing” panel (don’t sign anything you don’t understand.)  Then I was invited to sit in on the “We Love Anime” panel as Lois McMaster Bujold was unable to make it (new book soon!) and I am moderately well-versed in the subject.  More on that in a later post.

The “Intersection of Art and the Law” panel was hosted by an actual lawyer (Disclaimer:  this panel does not establish an attorney-client relationship, if you’re in trouble get your own lawyer.)  Some useful tips, but I didn’t write them down.

The “Mega Moneyduck Reveal” was in the main ballroom, and the venue was far too large for the event; we wound up all crowding onto the stage itself so we could see.  The game proceeded from the Vatican’s meteorite collection at the start to a failed romance at the end.

One more trip to the consuite to pack in calories for the long journey home, and then it was Closing Ceremonies time.  I’m afraid I was getting groggy again, so no clear memories.  The bus trip home was longer than expected as the route I picked only runs once an hour on Sundays, live and learn.

A fun weekend, and I look forward to the next Minicon, wherever it may be!

 

Open Thread: Minicon 50 Report

Over the Easter weekend, I went to Minicon, the Minnesota Scientifiction Society’s yearly convention.  This was the 50th convention, although not the fiftieth year, as a couple times early on it was held twice yearly.  To mark the milestone, the convention ran four days instead of the usual three, and had a whole bunch of Guests of Honor.

Created for me by Indigo Caldwell; please do not reuse without permission.
Created for me by Indigo Caldwell; please do not reuse without permission.

Unfortunately, I was only able to take one day off work, so missed the Thursday events altogether.  I arrived Friday morning at the RadiShTree Hotel in Bloomington (it’s been a Radisson, Sheraton and now a Doubletree) and realized this was my thirtieth Minicon!  Wow!  The registration desk was well-organized and I soon had my badge with Michael Whelan art and programs.

The first panel I attended was an interview of Jane Yolen (perhaps best known for children’s fantasy books, but she also wrote The Devil’s Arithmetic, a historical fiction novel about the Holocaust) by a local writing group, the Scribblies.  Ms. Yolen mentioned that she didn’t get her doctorate because her thesis was on the use of fairy tales in childhood education and the gatekeepers didn’t like that.  It’s since become a standard text Touch of Magic and she has six honorary doctorates now.

Then it was time for the only panel I was on, “Anime and Manga for Speculative Fiction Fans.”  Somehow Programming missed my repeated messages offering to moderate the panel and picked one of the panelists at random.  The panel discussion was a bit weaker than I would have liked, but there were still many items mentioned, and you can see a list in my just previous post.

From there I went to an interview of Tom Doherty, the publisher of Tor, which is a big science fiction and fantasy label.  He talked about the challenges facing the book publishing industry, including the loss of small regional book distributors and smaller chain bookstores.  That means it’s harder to reach casual readers who would pick up a book if they happened to see one, but won’t make a special trip to the big box store.

Then it was “Publishing After the Door Slams” which was about the alternatives to major publishers (who after all want to print books that they think will sell.)  Apparently one segment of e-publishing that makes money hand over fist is Big Beautiful Woman erotica–a market that apparently is starved for content.

Next up, the Brandon Sanderson interview (he finished the Wheel of Time series, but is a good author in his own right.)  He talked about taking a job as night clerk at a quiet hotel so he would have plenty of time to write.  After that I went to the Terry Pratchett Memorial; several of the attendees had known him well, including Greg Ketter, owner of Dreamhaven Books and the one who convinced Sir Terry to come to Minicon 40.

The hugest event of the night was the reunion of fan favorite local band Cats Laughing (X-Men fans will remember Kitty Pryde jamming with them once.)  I do poorly in crowded concert venues, so skipped it, but heard bits and pieces as I visited several room parties.  Love tasty food, and some parties had very nice items.

On Saturday, I cruised the art show/science exhibit/hucksters room after breakfast–Some beautiful art by Michael Whelan and also by local artists.

Then I attended an interview of Larry Niven (Ringworld) and heard about his many collaborations and how they worked (the Internet has been a real boon to the process.)  There was more of this at the “Adventures in Collaboration” panel immediately afterward.

I don’t remember too much of the “Social Pressure in Fandom” panel, although harrassment policies were mentioned.  I was too busy mentally preparing for the mass signing event.  “The Evolving Business of Books” had more Tom Doherty–he stressed that e-books were not a threat, but an opportunity, as were audiobooks.  Tor is teaming up with NASA to create books to get kids interested in space-related career fields.

“Deviance in Fiction” discussed the role of bad behavior in creating a story–there was general agreement that sometimes too much is too much and it spoils the book for that reader.  (Lord Foul’s Bane and a particularly hideous act by the protagonist early on was given as an example of a point at which several of the people in the room gave up on the book.)

“I’m a Cover Shopper” was a panel about the role of covers in attracting readers–the trend is towards covers that look good in a two-inch size on Internet sites.  We also discussed whether the writer should have input on the cover image.  (yes, but not control.  One example was given of an author who insisted the picture on the cover match the colors described in the book; this made the cover a mess of brown and gray.)

More parties!

Sunday morning meant one more sweep; I’d won a couple of things from the art room and could now use the rest of my budget to buy books.  I enjoyed a panel on “Linked Short Stories and Serial Novels” where we discussed Dickens, “fix-ups” (two or more short stories rewritten into a longer work) and other fun topics.

After officially checking out of my hotel room (and thus having to carry my luggage everywhere) I checked out the latter half of “Collaborative Creative Projects” which was about art installations primarily.  The slideshow stalled on a particularly disturbing image that distracted me for the rest of the panel.

My last panel was “Middle Grade Optimism vs YA Dystopia”, talking about the difference between writing for the “middle grade” and “young adult” markets.  It was emphasized that these were largely artificial distinctions.  However, a general rule of thumb is that middle grade books are given to the child by a parent, teacher or librarian; while young adult is when they begin seeking out books on their own (and start disdaining “this is inappropriate for your age group” comments.)

Closing ceremonies were fun as usual; next year’s convention will have Seanan McGuire of Newsflesh and Incryptids fame.

 

Tell me about your most recent convention experience, or a gathering you hope to attend in the near future!

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