Manga Review: Tokyo Ghoul Volume 1

Manga Review: Tokyo Ghoul Volume 1 by Sui Ishida

There is a parallel Earth that seems exactly like ours, except that humanity shares the planet with “ghouls.”  Ghouls are shaped like humans, and can pass for them with a little effort, but they are not human.  They possess body weapons known as “kagune” and can only eat human flesh.  Other than that, humans know little about them.  Most humans have never even seen a ghoul…that they know of.

Tokyo Ghoul Volume 1

One such human is Ken Kaneki, a college student majoring in classic literature.  He doesn’t confine himself to that, however, being a big fan of current author Sen Takatsuki’s latest novel, The Black Goat’s Egg.  He’s surprised and gratified when the attractive young woman Rize he’s seen at the coffee shop Anteiku turns out also to be a fan.  He even gets a date out of this, surprising his more outgoing buddy Hide.

Alas, it turns out that Rize isn’t into Takatsuki’s work for the delicate language and fine characterization.  She’s into the descriptions of serial killing.  Rize turns out to be not just a ghoul, but the one nicknamed “Binge Eater” for slaughtering and consuming more humans than she needs to to survive.  And she thinks Kaneki smells delicious!

Apparently by complete coincidence, a construction accident drops steel beams on the pair just as she’s about to chow down, instantly killing Rize and mortally wounding Kaneki.  A doctor in the emergency room takes the unauthorized step of transplanting Rize’s undamaged organs into Kaneki’s body to save his life.

Kaneki heals remarkably quickly, but soon finds himself the victim of a Kafka-esque transformation, unable to eat most foods and with a craving for human flesh.  Coffee is the only other thing he can keep down.  (This turns out to be true for all ghouls–now you know the hidden side of Starbucks.)  Kaneki is understandably revolted by the idea of eating people.  This puts him in the position of being neither human nor ghoul; or perhaps both human and ghoul.

This seinen (young men’s) horror-action manga ran from 2011-2014.  It has spawned a short anime series, a live-action movie, a full sequel and several spin-off miniseries.

In this first volume, Kaneki comes across as sniveling and ineffectual.  In fairness, he’s undergoing what is as far as he knows an unprecedented metamorphosis into a monster, with no more support system than a human buddy he couldn’t possibly tell what’s happening.  At this point, he’s unable to control one of his eyes changing color and needs to cover it with an eyepatch.  The volume concludes with Kaneki gaining a mentor who may be able to guide him in becoming a better half-ghoul.

There’s a certain amount of male gaze, particularly in the first chapter, when Kaneki and Hide visit “Big Girl”, an Anna Miller’s style restaurant known for the waitress uniforms emphasizing their breasts.  This eases off as the horror quotient rises.  Coffeeshop wait-person Touka Kirishima, who is a main character, gets to wear a less “sexy” uniform.

The art is fitting to the subject matter, but some of it is clumsy in this first volume–I am told it rapidly improves.

A lot of obvious questions aren’t answered in this volume–where did ghouls come from?  How do ghouls reproduce?  How do ghouls function in human society given their obligate anthropophagism?  Aren’t the police doing anything?  A humorous bonus chapter concerns a bit character ghoul who turns out to be far more fastidious about who he kills and eats than Rize, not that it does him any good.

Recommended to horror fans who prefer a more sympathetic monster as the protagonist.

Open Thread: Bloggers Get Social

Open Thread: Bloggers Get Social

Last Wednesday, I went to an event titled “Bloggers Get Social”, which was held at a Davanni’s in Edina.  Getting there was the first hurdle, as it started at 5 P.M. and I got off work at 4:30 several suburbs away.  I found an express route that worked on paper, but when I got to the bus stop, discovered I’d left my paper with the route number and the address of the Davanni’s back in the office.  Fortunately, I was able to work out which express bus out of the dozen that serve that stop it was by elimination.

Created for me by Indigo Caldwell; please do not reuse without permission.
Created for me by Indigo Caldwell; please do not reuse without permission.

Next problem:  When I got on the bus, I discovered that there were no schedules for the route on the bus–I knew one of the cross-streets where I had to get off, but not the other.  And everyone near me was firmly attached to their headphones except one lady who had no idea where that cross-street was.  The good news was, it was the very first stop  the express made in Edina, and the Davanni’s was clearly visible from the side of the bus I was on.  I was there only about fifteen minutes late!

Of course, that meant that the other attendees had already clumped up into tight groups at tables, so I was at a loss at first.  Good news, though, Davanni’s put on a nice spread for us, showcasing their variety of party foods.  Their party room space is also very nice.  https://www.davannis.com/location/edina/

The organizers of the social night were the folks from the MN Blogger Conference, which next meets at Concordia University in Saint Paul October 16th, 2016. http://www.mnbloggerconference.com/ After the owners of the Davanni’s gave a nice speech about the history of the restaurant and how their employees have helped build their menu over the years, a couple of other latecomers joined my table, and the organizers reminded everyone to switch tables every so often so that we would meet different people.

I still think I missed about half the bloggers there, but did manage to give out all the business cards with my blog info on them.  Not everyone had cards, but I did manage to get some.  In no particular order:

Faces of TBI:  This site is about people who have suffered Traumatic Brain Injury, both survivors and those who have passed on.  The author is Amy Zellner, writer of Life with a Traumatic Brain Injury: Finding the Road Back to Normal.  Her most recent blog post is an appearance by Dr. Bennet Omalu (played by Will Smith in Concussion) coming up in Saint Louis Park, Minnesota.  http://facesoftbi.com/an-evening-with-dr-bennet-omalu-minneapolis/

Stacie Sayz So:  A lifestyle blogger, a lot of her posts seem to be about beauty products from an affordable perspective.  But Stacie’s not just about product reviews!  Her most recent post is photography tips to enhance those pictures that come with your blog posts (I mostly cheat and just scan the book cover.)  http://www.staciesayzso.com/2016/02/how-i-stepped-up-my-camera-game-for-my.html

Kale & Ale:  Another lifestyle blog, this one about healthy eating and drinking.  Lots of recipes and gardening tips!  The latest post by author Valerie Dennis is about her trip to Old San Juan, Puerto Rico and the nice places she found to eat there.  http://kaleandale.com/2016/02/15/old-san-juan-puerto-rico/

Jen Jamar is a content strategist and social media manager, which is the kind of person I want to consult if I ever try to monetize this blog.  (Read me now while there’s still no ads 🙂  Her latest post is about a recent social media management tool update that looks scary, but probably is nothing to panic about:  http://www.jenjamar.com/yoast-3-0-1-heres-what-to-do-instead-of-freaking-out/

Donna Hup writes about small town Midwestern life: cooking, entertainment, travel and especially trucking!  Her most recent post is about a…unique…charity run she participated in for the Children’s Tumor Foundation.  Lots of fun pictures! http://donnahup.com/my-first-cupids-undie-run/

Paul Lundquist doesn’t have a blog as such, but is an advertising and commericial photographer if you can afford to commission the best pictures of stuff for your blog.  You can find a portfolio of his work at http://paullundquist.com/

I also remember a fellow doing something called Lifemap which will be a site that allows members to put pins in maps of places they’ve been and write about their experiences there.  I don’t think it’s in full production yet.

Davanni’s handed out gift bags, which contained Davanni’s glasses and a do-it-yourself Valentine treat kit.  Their regular dessert bars with small pots of frosting and sprinkles so you could customize them for your sweetie.  Thanks, Davanni’s!

I got a ride back to the big city from a fellow who works for Blackeye Roasting, a cold press coffee brewer.  He was giving out samples of their product.  Alas, I don’t like the taste of coffee, but here’s their website anyway: http://www.blackeyeroasting.co/about/

Sadly, I got a raging cold the next day, and hadn’t felt up to writing about the experience till now.

Please visit some of these folks, and in the comments, mention your favorite blog that needs more visitors!

Book Review: The 36 Ancient Chinese Strategies for Modern Business

Book Review: The 36 Ancient Chinese Strategies for Modern Business by Lan Bercu

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

The 36 Ancient Chinese Strategies for Modern Business

Beginning some time in the late 1970s, when it became obvious that Japan had become an economic powerhouse, American businesses began taking an interest in Asian philosophies that might explain why companies from those areas were doing so well, especially in industries where America was faltering.   Thus, books for business explicating on The Five Rings, The Art of War and so forth have been written and often sold well.

This is the latest book in that tradition.  The author was born and raised in Vietnam, where The 36 Strategies, a text on warfare believed to have been compiled during China’s Warring States period, is read by schoolchildren.  She has since found the information included helpful in her career as a speaker on business and international matters.

The main text is divided into thirty-six short chapters, one for each strategy.  Each starts with a short story about ancient Chinese warfare, then one or more examples of how modern businesses have implemented these strategies, whether by name or by chance.  This is followed by translation into more basic tips, and questions for the business to ask itself based on the strategy.

Some of the strategies have poetic sounding titles, like “slough off the cicada’s golden shell” or “borrow a corpse to resurrect a soul”, while others are more plain-spoken, like “kill with a borrowed knife.”   The strategies themselves, however, tend to be simple to understand, if sometimes difficult to apply to a given situation.  That last bit is why they’re arranged by type; some are better when you have a clear advantage, others when you’re on the defensive or in a losing position.

It should be noted that the more literal applications of some of these strategies to business, such as “replace the beam with rotted timbers” and “deck the tree with false blossoms” may be considered unethical, and in some cases are outright illegal.  The author points out that businesses (and customers) should be aware of these strategies anyway, to help defend against them.

The short chapters and copious examples make this a good read for the busy person on the go; this is one time I would suggest buying the e-book version.  The book comes with an ad for the author’s services, bibliography and an index.

The utility of this book will depend on whether you already have another of the books relating the 36 strategies to business.  If so, you may not need this one.  This book also has a lot of synergy with The Art of War, so you may want to invest in one of the business books that concentrate on that text as well.

In war, do not repeat the tactics that have gained you one victory.  Rather, let your methods be determined by the infinite variety of circumstances. — Sun Tzu

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