Open Thread: 2017 Wrap-Up

Open Thread: 2017 Wrap-Up

That was a rough year, but I read a lot of books and made many posts!  As usual with these annual wrap-ups, let’s start with the top tens!

Top Ten Posts of 2017

The Financial Expert

  1. Book Review: The Financial Expert
  2. Book Review: The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds
  3. Book Review: The Black Tulip
  4. TV Review: Mannix
  5. Manga Review: Inuyashiki #1-3
  6. Manga Review: Blade of the Immortal Omnibus 1
  7. Book Review: Our Man in Charleston
  8. Anime Review: The Kindaichi Case Files Return
  9. Book Review: Inferior
  10. TV Review: Thunderbolt Fantasy

The big surprise for the year is the sudden interest in Mannix.  Mike Connors, the star of that beloved detective show, passed away in January.

Top Ten Posts of All Time

Urusei Yatsura

  1. Book Review: The Financial Expert
  2. Anime Review: Urusei Yatsura
  3. Manga Review: Shonen Jump Weekly (USA)
  4. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
  5. Book Review: The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds
  6. Manga Review: Vagabond Volume 1
  7. Book Review: Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
  8. Comic Book Review: The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition
  9. Anime Review: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
  10. Anime Review: Magi – Labyrinth of Magic

R.K. Narayan’s masterpiece is likely to sit at the top of this list for years to come.

Now, let’s break it down by category.

Top Ten Books 2017

The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds

  1. The Financial Expert
  2. The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds
  3. The Black Tulip
  4. Our Man in Charleston
  5. Inferior
  6. Uncle Tom’s Cabin
  7. The Sea-Wolf
  8. The Guns of Navarone
  9. Last Hope Island
  10. A Memory This Size and Other Stories: The Caine Prize for African Writing 2013

50% “classics”, 30% history, 20 % other.

Top Ten Manga 2017

Inuyashiki 1

  1. Inuyashiki #1-3
  2. Blade of the Immortal Omnibus 1
  3. Let’s Dance a Waltz
  4. Doraemon Vol. 1
  5. Futaba-kun Change! Vol. 1
  6. Cells at Work!
  7. Shonen Jump Weekly (2016)
  8. Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
  9. Platinum End Volume 3
  10. Die Wergelder 1

Inuyashiki has an anime now, and Blade of the Immortal just had a live-action movie.

Top Ten Comics 2017

The Fix Volume One Where Beagles Dare

  1. The Fix, Volume 1: Where Beagles Dare
  2. Teen Titans Earth One Volume One
  3. The New Teen Titans Volume One
  4. Kill 6 Billion Demons 1
  5. Showcase Presents: The Trial of the Flash
  6. Showcase Presents: Weird War Tales Volume 1
  7. Jack Kirby’s The Demon
  8. Essential Captain Marvel Vol. 2
  9. Our Army at War
  10. Johnny Comet

Nice to see a non-superhero title get interest!

Top Ten Anime 2017

The Kindaichi Case Files Return

  1. The Kindaichi Case Files Return
  2. Urusei Yatsura
  3. Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Diamond Is Unbreakable
  4. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
  5. Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
  6. Matchless Raijin-Oh
  7. The Rose of Versailles
  8. Tonari no Seki-Kun
  9. Lupin the Third: The Italian Adventure
  10. Erased

People wanted to know about jigsaw puzzle murder mysteries this year, I guess.

And now, the Top Ten countries that looked at this blog in 2017!

The Penguin Guide to the United States Constitution

  1. United States of America
  2. United Kingdom
  3. Canada
  4. India
  5. Australia
  6. Phillipines
  7. Germany
  8. Japan
  9. France
  10. Indonesia

And one lonely visitor from Tunisia!  Please come back and bring a friend!

What were your favorite posts this year?  What would you like to see in 2018?

Book Review: My Ultimate Super Hero Manual

Book Review: My Ultimate Super Hero Manual by Steve Behling

Almost every comic book-loving kid has gone through a phase when they seriously wanted to be a superhero.  Wearing a flashy costume, having neat powers, hanging out with people like Spider-Man and Storm; what’s not to love?   At the very least, designing your own super hero character can be a blast.  And this book is meant to help you do just that!

My Ultimate Super Hero Manual

It’s a children’s activity book from the folks who bring you Marvel Comics.  There are pencil and paper exercises, but also ways to make homebrew “superpowers” and costumes.  (Be sure to ask your parents’ permission.  If you are an orphan, you’re already halfway down the road to being a superhero, but ask your guardian’s permission anyway.)  There’s even special dice you can put together to play games.

There’s a plethora of Marvel superheros and villains shown or mentioned–some jokes will only be gotten by long-time fans, but most of the humor is accessible by kids.  (There’s even an index for us scholarly types!)  New art is by Juan Ortiz, while other pieces are reprinted from classic Marvel comics and not individually credited.  (Thanks, “work for hire” contracts!)   Marvel’s female heroes are under-represented.

As a long-time Marvel Comics fan, I have a soft spot for books like this.  At a guess, I’d recommend it to kids from 4th to 6th grade, maybe younger under close supervision, plus old-timers like me who will get all the obscure references.   And the physical copy is recommended far more than the Kindle version–have you ever tried drawing in a Kindle file?

Open Thread: Top Posts of 2016!

Open Thread: Top Posts of 2016!

I’m sure you all know how top ten lists work, so let’s get straight into it!

The Financial Expert

Top Ten Posts of 2016
1. Book Review: The Financial Expert
2. Anime Review: Urusei Yatsura
3. Open Thread: Minicon 51 Report
4. Comic Book Review: Batman Deathblow After the Fire
5. Book Review: The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds
6. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
7. Manga Review: Ooku 10 & 11
8. Comic Strip Review: Kill 6 Billion Demons 1
9. Book Review: Outlaws of the Atlantic: Sailors, Pirates and Motley Crews in the Age of Sail
10. Book Review: The Guns of Navarone

The Financial Expert by R.K. Narayan was the dark horse victory of the year. It was a book randomly selected off the shelf at a used bookstore for my #ReadPOC2016 challenge. And somehow, my review of it is within the top ten of Google results for this book!

Now let’s compare to the list of all-time favorite posts as selected by you, the readers.

Urusei Yatsura

Top Ten All-Time Posts
1. Anime Review: Urusei Yatsura
2. Manga Review: Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
3. Book Review: Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
4. Comic Book Review: The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition
5. Manga Review: Vagabond Volume 1
6. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
7. Anime Review: Magi – Labyrinth of Magic
8. Book Review: The Financial Expert
9. Anime Review: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
10. Book Review: Narrative Structure in Comics: Making Sense of Fragments

As you can see, “Those Annoying Aliens” is a series with legs.

Time to break it down into categories, starting with the media type this blog is mostly about.

The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds

Top Ten Books 2016
1. The Financial Expert
2. The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds
3. Outlaws of the Atlantic: Sailor, Pirates and Motley Crews in the Age of Sail
4. The Guns of Navarone
5. White Fang
6. They Talked to a Stranger
7. The Black Tulip
8. The Inugami Clan
9. The Casebook of Carnacki the Ghost Finder
10. Thanks for the Feedback (tie)
10. Jewish Noir (tie)

Four of these eleven were #ReadPOC2016 selections, but more notable is the dominance of older works.

Active Raid

Top Ten Anime 2016
1. Urusei Yatsura
2. Active Raid
3. The Kindaichi Case Files Return
4. Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
5. The Rose of Versailles
6. Tonari no Seki-Kun
7. Matchless Raijin-Oh
8. Mushibugyo
9. Invaders of the Rokujyoma!?
10. Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches

Active Raid, Kindaichi and Jojo’s have all had new seasons since my reviews.

Cover of Batman/Deathstroke

Top Ten Comicbooks 2016
1. Batman/Deathblow After the Fire
2. Showcase Presents: Weird War Tales Volume 1
3. Vertigo CYMK
4. Teen Titans Earth One Volume 1
5. Showcase Presents: The Great Disaster Featuring the Atomic Knights
6. Child of the Sun
7. Showcase Presents: The Trial of the Flash
8. Essential Sub-Mariner, Vol. 1
9. Essential Rampaging Hulk, Vol. 1
10. Showcase Presents: Super Friends

Apparently there was a huge jump of interest in Brian Azzarello’s early DC work this year.

Ooku 11

Top Ten Manga 2016
1. Ooku 10 & 11
2. Vinland Saga Book Seven
3. Dream Fossil
4. Ayako
5. Die Wergelder 1
6. Princess Jellyfish Volume 1
7. Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches #1
8. A*Tomcat
9. Let’s Dance a Waltz (tie)
9. Assassination Classroom (tie)

More mature titles were strong this year, with the first young adult title coming in at #7.

And now, let’s look at where you, the all-important readers are coming from!

The Naturalist Theodore Roosevelt

Top Ten Viewing Countries 2016
1. United States
2. United Kingdom
3. Canada
4. Russia
5. France
6. Germany
7. Brazil
8. India
9. Australia
10. Japan

There was one lonely visitor from Bahrain–tell your friends!

The number one search term this year was “Images of Bela Lugosi in ‘The Island of Dr. Moreau.'”

And now it’s your turn! Have any thoughts on the winning media? What else have you enjoyed this year?

Happy New Year!

Book Review: Shot in the Face: A Savage Journey to the Heart of Transmetropolitan

Book Review: Shot in the Face: A Savage Journey to the Heart of Transmetropolitan edited by Chad Nevett

Disclaimer:  I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review.

Shot in the Face

Transmetropolitan was a science fiction comic book series co-created by writer Warren Ellis and artist Darick Robertson that ran under the Helix and Vertigo imprints for sixty issues from 1997-2002.  It details the journey of “gonzo journalist” Spider Jerusalem as he is forced to return to the sprawling City and becomes involved in presidential politics.  The foul-mouthed and personally noxious Jerusalem has one redeeming quality, an absolute dedication to tell the truth as he sees it, and in the bizarre world of the future, that quality is vital.

This book is a collection of essays on various aspects of Transmetropolitan, from its publishing history to how it compares to other works by Mr. Ellis.  It’s been in my To Be Read pile for a long time, since its publication in 2013, as I had meant to actually read Transmetropolitan first.  But the volumes I needed were checked out at the library, and weeks went by and then I lost track of this book.  Having it surface again, I decided to read it without finishing the original series.

The essays, for the most part, seem pretty solid.  There’s one that compares and contrasts Spider Jerusalem with Hunter S. Thompson, who was a major inspiration for the character, and another on whether Jerusalem counts as a “super-hero” as well as detailed looks at the plot structure and interviews with the creators.  Some of the essays could have used another proofreader pass, as I spotted spellchecker typos and sentence fragments.

The essay “Supporting Players: Women in Transmetropolitan” by Greg Burgas seemed a little off as he does not even mention two minor characters who show Spider Jerusalem’s less stellar qualities, mentioned in a couple of the other essays, and seemingly this essay would have been the place to go into depth about them.

Several pages from the comics are reproduced in black and white to illustrate points, and there are a few stills from a documentary about Ellis.

As one might expect, there’s a lot of rough language in here, mostly in quotes from the series, and discussions of edgy topics–consider this to have the same “mature readers” designation as the comics.

Primarily recommended to fans of Transmetropolitan or of Warren Ellis in general.  If you haven’t read the series yet, you will be better served by doing that first.

Manga Review: Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga Volume 3

Manga Review: Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga Volume 3 by Jiro Kuwata

Quick recap:  The 1960s Batman television show was popular in Japan as well, and a tie-in manga was done by 8-Man creator Jiro Kuwata.  It was not based on the show as such, but on the Batman comic books of the time, so had a slightly more serious tone.  This is the final volume of the translated collection.

Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga Volume 3

We open with Batman and Robin battling the Planet King, a character who uses superscience gadgets based on properties of the planets of our solar system.  The Mercury suit projects heat, the Jupiter suit can make objects giant-sized and so forth.  There’s a double fake-out as to the identity of the Planet King, and a motive for his rampage that seems better suited to a Superman comic.

Then there’s a story about three escaped criminals using remote-controlled robots to commit robberies.  This one has a “electricity does not work that way” moment that took me out of the story.

This is followed by a Clayface story that chronologically happens before the story in the second volume, which may have confused some readers at the time.

The next story is about a series of robberies committed by criminals in cosplay outfits as part of a contest.  Some highlights include Batman disguised as a criminal disguised as Batman, a functionally illiterate crook faced with writing a name, and one contestant’s attempt to rig the contest being foiled by criminals’ congenital inability to follow the rules.  In many ways the best story in this volume.

After that, we have a story of Catman, whose cloak supposedly gives him nine lives.  (No mention of Catwoman, alas.)  His Japanese costume is much cooler looking than the American version.

Then a somewhat longer story about a “ghost” who initially looks like Robin, then Batman, and finally gives up the disguise to be his own character.  The main difficulty the Dynamic Duo faces here is that the Phantom Batman can hit them, but not vice-versa.

The final story has our heroes being captured by an alien dictator and forced into gladiatorial combat with representatives of three other planets for the Emperor’s amusement.  Naturally, Batman restores good government.  “Peace is the best option for everyone.”

There’s a short article about Mr. Kuwata’s adaptation process, and a list of which American issues he adapted.

This is very much an adaptation for elementary school boys, with little in the way of subtlety, and female characters kept to a minimum.  The art is often stiff and old-fashioned, and minor character faces are reused quite a bit.  Still, it’s fun adventure, and Kuwata often put an interesting spin on the original material.  Recommended for the intersection of Batman fans and manga fans.

Book Review: Nick Carter Volume 2

Book Review: Nick Carter Volume 2 edited by Anthony Tollin

As noted in my review of the first volume, Nick Carter, Master Detective, was a long-running character who had three distinct phases.  These reprint volumes primarily cover his pulp magazine career.  The stories were written under the house name “Nick Carter,” even though they weren’t in first person.

Nick Carter, Volume Two

“Whispers of Death” by John Chambliss leads off the volume.  A Presidential Commission has met to decide if New York should have a federally-run electric power distribution system, ala the Tennessee Valley Authority, (still new in 1935 when the story was written.)  They’ve made their secret decision and sent it off to Washington so that the President can announce it in four days’ time.  But Mr. Ballard, the head of the commission, suspects something has gone wrong, and calls Nick Carter in for a consultation.  By the time Nick arrives, Ballard has been murdered!

The government orders Nick to keep this murder a secret, even from the police, so that the public won’t panic about what this means for the power industry.  This hampers his investigation considerably, although it’s clear that whoever the murderer is, Ballard knew them and it is almost certainly something to do with the commission’s decision.  And therefore the other members of the commission are the main suspects!

Nick Carter and his closest associates soon discover they’re up against a “whisper gang” that uses cleverly planted rumors to manipulate markets.  But who’s behind the gang?  They’ll need to do a lot of shooting, fist-fighting, escaping from death traps and, oh yeah, actual detective work to figure it out.

Of note is that the writer apparently was not aware of FDR’s physical limitations (or, since the President is never named, we are in an alternate universe) as he has him walking around freely.

There’s a touch of period ethnic stereotyping and sexism (it’s mentioned a couple of times how surprising it is that Nick’s female assistant Roxy is a competent operative.)

“Trail of the Scorpion” is by Thomas Calvert McClary, who also wrote “The Impossible Theft” in the first volume (and which is referenced in this story.)  Nick Carter receives a visitor who’s tattooed in a code known only to himself and one other person (who is not the person with the tattoo.)  A messenger will soon arrive beating a ring engraved with a scorpion, and the fate of far Iraghan hangs in the balance.

The identity of the story’s villain is quickly revealed, an usurper named McClelland, but the mystery is where that man hid the gold he looted from Iraghan’s treasury before he was expelled from that country.  Mixed up in this somehow is a con artist named Winnie the Weeper.  But is she working for McClelland, against him, or just for herself?

Nick gets into a lot of narrow scrapes in this one, having his guns and tools stolen more than once, and taking more head trauma than could possibly be good for him.  The trail takes him to Valdosta, Georgia and from  there deep into the Everglades.

There’s a lot of outdated ethnic stereotyping in this one, as McClelland is an equal-opportunity employer–to the point that one of the minor characters is known as “the Caucasian.”  There’s also some torture by the bad guys.

Another note for both these stories is that Nick Carter doesn’t get paid for either of these adventures, nor does he ever discuss his finances.

“The Voice of Crime”, an episode of the radio show version written by Walter B. Gibson (The Shadow) and Edward Gruskin, on the other hand, has Nick hurting for cash.  Enough so that when a safecracker known as “Vox” offers a $10,000 reward if Nick Carter can capture him, Nick is all too willing to take the too clever for his own good criminal as a client.  One gets the feeling that Nick really enjoys letting Vox think he’s outsmarted the master detective before puncturing his balloon.

“The Shadow Calling Nick Carter” is also by Walter B. Gibson with artist Charles Coll, an adaptation of the radio episode just mentioned in comic book form to turn it into a crossover with the Shadow.  It’s very slight, but a rare crossover by one of the original writers of the Shadow character.

Both of the magazine stories are very exciting, though the second one may have too many racist undertones for some readers.  Recommended for pulp fans.

Open Thread: Top Ten Lists 2015

Like many bloggers, I keep a close eye on the stats of which posts get traffic, and it’s time to reveal the winners for this year.  You all like list posts, right?  So here are the reviews you the readers felt were important in 2015.

Urusei Yatsura

Top Ten Posts of 2015

  1. Anime Review: Urusei Yatsura
  2. Book Review: Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
  3. Manga Review: Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
  4. Manga Review: Assassination Classroom
  5. Comic Book Review: Essential Sub-Mariner Vol. 1
  6. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
  7. Magazine Review: Analog Science Fiction and Fact June 2015
  8. Anime Review: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
  9. Book Review: They Talked to a Stranger
  10. Manga Review: Shonen Jump Weekly (USA) 2014

I might be better off as an anime and manga reviewer, it seems.  Now let’s see how that compares to all clicks since the beginning of the blog!

Shonen

Top Ten Posts Cumulative

  1. Manga Review: Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
  2. Comic Book Review: The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition
  3. Book Review: Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
  4. Manga Review: Vagabond Volume 1
  5. Anime Review: Urusei Yatsura
  6. Anime Review: Magi: Labyrinth of Magic
  7. Book Review: Narrative Structure in Comics: Making Sense of Fragments
  8. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
  9. Comic Strip Review: Spacetrawler Book 1 The Human Seat
  10. Anime Review: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency

Admittedly, older posts have an advantage as they just keep having people stumble across them.  Now, let’s break it down by type of review!

Jojo's Bizarre Adventures
Dio and Jonathan

Top Ten Anime of 2015

  1. Urusei Yatsura
  2. Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood /Battle Tendency
  3. Mushibugyo
  4. Magi: The Kingdom of Magic
  5. Matchless Raijin-Oh
  6. Magi: Labyrinth of Magic
  7. Argevollen
  8. Invaders of the Rokujyoma!?
  9. I Can’t Understand What My Husband Is Saying
  10. Humanity Has Declined

You folks love your classic anime, it seems.

Flag

Top Ten Books of 2015

  1. Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
  2. They Talked to a Stranger
  3. Narrative Structure in Comics: Making Sense of Fragments
  4. White Fang
  5. Thanks for the Feedback
  6. Global Friendship Vol. 5: United Kingdom-Zambia
  7. The Pirate Princess
  8. Strip for Murder
  9. The Blue Fairy Book
  10. The 47 Ronin

Non-fiction dominates with the top three spots!

Essential Sub-Mariner

Top Ten Comic Books of 2015

  1. Essential Sub-Mariner Vol. 1
  2. Batman: Earth One Volume Two
  3. Showcase Presents the Great Disaster Featuring the Atomic Knights
  4. Showcase Presents: Weird War Tales Volume 1
  5. Bodies
  6. Child of the Sun
  7. Essential Rampaging Hulk, Vol. 1
  8. 47 Ronin
  9. Showcase Presents: Superman Family Volume 4
  10. Showcase Presents Superfriends

Who would have thought Namor McKenzie would be so popular?

Assassination Classroom

Top Ten Manga of 2015

  1. Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
  2. Assassination Classroom
  3. Shonen Jump Weekly (USA) 2014
  4. Ikigami: The Ultimate Limit
  5. UQ Holder, Vol. 1
  6. My Hero Academia #1
  7. Vagabond Volume 1
  8. Showa 1944-1953 A History of Japan
  9. Vinland Saga Book Four
  10. Yukarism

Shounen dominates this list, probably because I review Shonen Jump every year.  Now let’s take a look at where my visitors came from this year.

The Return of George Washington 1783-1789

Top Ten Viewing Countries of 2015

  1. United States
  2. United Kingdom
  3. Brazil
  4. Canada
  5. France
  6. Australia
  7. Russia
  8. Germany
  9. Italy
  10. Indonesia

The first two are no surprise, but way to go, Brazil!  And I had one lonely visitor from Curaçao; I hope they’ll be back next year and bring friends.

The top search term of the year was “Mack Hassler”; this science fiction poet is largely responsible for my Analog 1000 review doing so well.  I feel kind of bad my review of his work was lukewarm.

Which reviews did you enjoy this year?  Anything I should review in 2016?

Book Review: The League of Regrettable Superheroes

Book Review: The League of Regrettable Superheroes by Jon Morris

There have been thousands of superheroes created for comic books since their origins in the 1930s.  Some of them have gone on to lasting success like Superman, Spider-Man or Batman.  Others have had solid B-list careers, staying in the minds of fandom, if not the general public.  And then there are these folks.

The League of Regrettable Superheroes

This is a collection of oddball characters, many very obscure, that represent the wide breadth of superhero types that have appeared over the years.  Like Fantomah, possibly the first ever female superhero.  She was a fur-clad jungle queen whose “white goddess” shtick was literal, turning into a skull-faced nigh-omnipotent punisher of evil whenever she felt like it.  Or NFL Superpro, an American football-themed hero foisted on the Marvel Universe to raise awareness of the sport.

Not all of the covered material is so obscure.  Doll Man (can shrink to six inches tall) had a very respectable run in the Golden Age, and reappears periodically.  And Squirrel Girl, despite her creation for a throwaway filler story and oddball nature (she can talk to squirrels, and has their powers) has become a fan favorite, and is enjoying a very successful solo series right now.

Mr. Morris covers the characters’ origins (if known), most interesting stories and publishing history.  He also lists little factoids for them, some true, others just humorous.  As with Doctor Hormone (master of biochemistry applied to mad science):  “Adherence to basic medical ethics: iffy.”

It’s pointed out that none of these are really bad characters as such–they appeared at publishers rapidly going out of business, or their gimmicks are dated, or in the case of Rom, Spaceknight the legal rights are tied up, making him unusable in his classic form.  But with a good creative team and the right story, any of them could be rescued from obscurity.  (Who thought we’d see a movie (especially a good movie) about the Scott Lang Ant-Man in our lifetimes?)

The characters are arranged alphabetically by the era of comics they appeared in (with footnotes reminding us that the dates of these eras are in dispute.)  There’s lots of four-color art, ranging from the excellent to the much less good.  If there is one weakness, it’s that the volume is very US-centric.  Only Nelvana of the Northern Lights (half-goddess  of the Inuit) made it in from Canadian comics, and there’s a overview of Captain Marvel (the original’s) overseas clones, all created by one British fellow, to cover the rest of the world.

This would make an excellent holiday or birthday gift for a comic book fan with a sense of humor.  Other folks might want to look at it via the library just to get an idea of the truly amazing variety of superheroes comics have to offer.

Manga Review: Batman: the Jiro Kuwata Batmanga

Manga Review: Batman: the Jiro Kuwata Batmanga by Jiro Kuwata

In the mid-1960s, the Batman TV show was a huge hit not just in America, but also in Japan.  As a tie-in, 8-Man creator Jiro Kuwata was hired to create a manga version of Batman for the local market.  While the television show was more based on the late 1950s comic books, the research materials Mr. Kuwata were given were from the “New Look” period, which discarded many of the sillier elements that had been layered onto the franchise over the previous decade to make the Batman comic books as serious as you could expect in the Silver Age.

Batmanga

Thus, this manga has relatively little humor, focusing on Batman as a scientifically-trained detective.  Robin is a bit irreverent, but not nearly as much of a wise-cracker as he was in the American comics.  The serialized weekly format also changes the structure of the stories, which is more obvious in the plots that are lifted directly from the U.S. version.

The first story is an adaptation of the appearance of very minor villain Death-Man.  For the manga version, his name was changed to Shinigamijin which would be literally translated back into English as “Death God Man”, so it’s rendered as “Lord Death-Man” instead.  The villain’s gimmick is that each time he’s captured, he dies, then comes back to life and commits more crimes.  This freaks Batman the heck out until he finally figures out the trick, and Lord Death-Man meets his final fate.

Oddly, there’s an appearance by a Flash villain, the Weather Wizard, renamed Go Go the Magician.  This story demonstrates Batman’s skill at “prep time” setting up a plan to deal with Go Go’s weather control powers which would normally make the villain hard for a normal human to defeat.

The final storyline in this volume, “The Man Who Quit Being Human”, showcases how adaptation changes stories.  Both versions feature the governor of whatever state it is that Gotham City is in discovering that he has a gene that allows for mutation.  He agrees to undergo an experimental process to stimulate this gene to see what mutants will be like, so that if more show up, humanity will be ready.  Unfortunately, it turns out that mutants are insanely powerful, implacably hostile to normal humans and will attempt to destroy humanity.  Batman is regretfully forced to destroy the mutant (his code vs. killing does not apply to non-humans.)

The Japanese version gives the governor a daughter who also has the mutant gene.  The scientific community debates what to do about this, and the consensus is that she, and by extension anyone else with the mutant gene, must be preemptively executed to prevent further evil mutants.  Can our heroes find a way to spare her?  This raises the stakes nicely.

The art is very 60s manga, and might take some getting used to for those used to modern art styles.  There are a few pages where Mr. Kuwata obviously took a lot more time for detailed renderings; these are particularly effective.

This volume is recommended for Batman fans, and fans of 1960s superheroes in general.  Note that some of this material has been previously been printed in a coffee-table sized book, which has a lot of extra information about the series and is highly recommended.

Open Thread: Happy New Year!

2014 ends, and 2015 begins, so let’s see what this year’s top ten lists look like. (You like top ten lists, right?)

Top Ten Posts of 2014

The Forgotten Man

Comic Book Review: The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition
Comic Strip Review: Spacetrawler Book 1 The Human Seat
Manga Review: Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
Book Review: Insurrections of the Mind
Book Review: Narrative Structure in Comics: Making Sense of Fragments
Manga Review: Vagabond Volume 1
Anime Review: Magi – Labyrinth of Magic
Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
Book Review: Good Advice from Bad People
Manga Review: Vinland Saga Book One

Top Ten Posts Ever

magi

Comic Book Review: The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition
Anime Review: Magi – Labyrinth of Magic
Manga Review: Vagabond Volume 1
Manga Review: Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
Comic Strip Review: Spacetrawler Book 1 The Human Seat
Book Review: Insurrections of the Mind
Book Review: Narrative Structure in Comics: Making Sense of Fragments
Book Review: Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
Book Review: Good Advice from Bad People

Top Ten Comic Book Reviews

The Great Disaster

The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition
Showcase Presents: The Great Disaster Featuring the Atomic Knights
47 Ronin
Showcase Presents: The Trial of the Flash
Jack Kirby’s The Demon
Showcase Presents: Showcase Volume 1
Showcase Presents: The House of Secrets Volume One
El Deafo
Constantine Volume 1: The Spark and the Flame
The Thrilling Adventure Hour

Top Ten Manga Reviews

Shonen Jump 2014

Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
Vagabond Volume 1
Vinland Saga Book One
Vinland Saga Book Three
Shonen Jump Weekly (USA) 2014
Naruto
Rin-ne
Vinland Saga Book Two
Magi #1
Ayako

Top Ten Book Reviews

Insurrections of the Mind

Insurrections of the Mind
Narrative Structure in Comics: Making Sense of Fragments
Good Advice from Bad People
Thanks for the Feedback
The 47 Ronin
White Fang
Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
They Talked To a Stranger
An Accidental Abduction
Hell-Bent

Top Ten Anime Reviews

Jojo's Bizarre Adventures
Dio and Jonathan

Magi – Labyrinth of Magic
Magi – The Kingdom of Magic
Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
Urusei Yatsura
Kill la Kill
Matchless Raijin-Oh
Shiki
Samurai Flamenco
Mushibugyo
Elfen Lied

Top Ten Countries That Visited

America

United States
United Kingdom
Canada
Brazil
Australia
France
Germany
India
Japan
Italy

So, which book or other media really excited you in 2014, and what are you looking forward to in 2015?

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