Magazine Review: Water~Stone Review Volume 15: Dark Matter

Magazine Review: Water~Stone Review Volume 15: Dark Matter edited by Mary François Rockcastle

This literary journal is published by Hamline University in Minnesota.  The title comes from another name of the Philosopher’s Stone, the transformative agent which turned base metals into gold, in the search for true immortality, as literature turns ordinary words into art.  This issue’s theme is “dark matter” the unknown encountered and given a name by humans in an attempt to categorize it.

Water~Stone Review #15

This issue is heavy on the poetry, unfortunately, most of it is modern poetry which (as I have mentioned before) I do not have the tools to fully appreciate–I can’t even tell good modern poetry from bad.   I did like Ruth Stone’s “Train Ride” which at least has a rhyme scheme and comprehensible imagery.  Also of note is “Song for the Generations: December 26, 1862” by Gwen Westerman.  It’s about the mass hanging of Native Americans in Minnesota as a result of a rebellion, and uses a particular line structure to reflect this event.  (For more on this subject, see my review of The Thirty-Ninth Man by Dale Swanson.)  It’s also the poem in this issue that caused the most dissension in the editorial office, as different families learned different stories of the event.

One of the two book reviews covers three books of modern poetry–because of my previously-mentioned problem, it read like gibberish to me.  There’s also an interview with poet Ralph Angel, and that was mildly interesting.

The fiction and “creative non-fiction” sections are very similar, being mostly melancholy stories about relationships with parents or loved ones that stop rather than have endings.  Of the fiction, the most striking was “Missions, 1969” by Anastasia Faunce.  A little girl is used as a servant at her mother’s moon-themed party, and learns yet another lesson about the casual cruelty of adults.

From the non-fiction section, the two most interesting pieces are “Elegy for the Old NIght Sky and Other Bodies” by Katie Hae Leo, about childlessness, being an adoptee, and dark matter; and “Dust to Dust” by Amy Roper, about the author’s job cleaning fossils for a museum.

There are also visual arts, a section of photographs titled “Open. Shut. Open.”  It’s pretty random-feeling, some are in color, a few are interesting.   Lawrence Sutin contributes two “erasure pieces” in which he has taken old books and erased most of the words to create “found” poetry.  It seems like a mutilation of perfectly good books to me.

The concluding piece is another book review, three books that reflect the reviewer’s hobby of collecting other people’s home movies.

Due to my dislike of modern poetry and the generally depressing nature of most of the prose pieces, I did not get much out of this magazine, despite the above-average quality of writing.  If modern poetry is your bag, I think you’ll appreciate this much more than I did.

Magazine Review: Conjunctions: 51 The Death Issue

Magazine Review:  Conjunctions: 51 The Death Issue edited by David Shields and Bradford Morrow

Conjunctions is a literary journal published twice a year by Bard College.  Each issue contains essays, short fiction, poetry and less classifiable writing on a given subject, with this issue being about death.  Literary journals tend to have a connotation of pretentiousness, and death is one of the primal subjects, so I approached this 2008 issue with a bit of trepidation.

Conjunctions 51

The issue starts strong with an essay entitled “The Sutra of Maggots and Blowflies” by Sallie Tisdale.  It’s a stomach-churning but very informative look at flies, Buddhism, and the Buddha nature of flies.  The ending piece is “Andalucia” by H.G. Carrillo, the story of a writer mourning his artist lover, who has died of AIDS.

In between, the most memorable pieces are Joyce Carol Oates’ “Dear Husband”, a chilling suicide note; and “St. Francis Preaches to the Birds” by David Ives, a not-quite-working comedic play about the saint’s encounter with vultures.  Several of the pieces caused me to shed a tear.  Sadly, as I cannot make head or tail of the appeal of modern poetry, I feel unable to comment on whether any of the poetry was good.   Two pieces are illustrated with photographs, the only visual art in the issue.

With forty pieces altogether, this is a thick volume that takes some grit to get through.  I understand that the Oates story is in one of her own anthologies, so if noir fiction is your thing, you might want to check that out.   The rest is a mixed bag; see if your library system has a copy of this or other issues so you can see if Conjunctions is something you want to subscribe to.

“I am merely departing”–Lucius Seneca.

Manga Review: Ikigami: The Ultimate Limit

Manga Review: Ikigami: The Ultimate Limit by Motoro Mase

In an alternate-history Japan, the government immunizes all children as they enter first grade.  But one in every thousand injection also contains a nanocapsule that lodges in the child’s heart.  and somewhere between age 18 and 24, will activate and stop that heart.  There’s a triple-blind system in place to prevent anyone from knowing just which injections contain the lethal capsules.

Ikigami

But just before the capsule is due to detonate, the name of the person is revealed to a government agency that delivers death notices known as ikigami to the victim twenty-four hours in advance.  One such deliveryman is a bureaucrat named Kengo Fujimoto.

The frame story follows Fujimoto as he joins the Ministry, gets his basic training, and delivers the ikigami.   He’s a bland character, which is deliberate.  He’s drifted through his early life without any particular direction, and wound up in this job more or less through inertia.  Each volume covers two deliveries.

This is where most of the action is, as the actual stories are asking the question, “What would you do if you only have twenty-four hours to live?”  The answers are as different as the victims, who range from brilliant creative types who had their whole future ahead of them through average kids to criminals with nothing left to lose.  There is, of course, a part of the law that punishes your family if you take the opportunity to go on a crime spree, but not everyone is deterred by that.

In the volume at hand, #9, the cases are:

“National Welfare Immunization”  A young woman who became a nurse specializing in neonatal care because she was born prematurely and had to struggle for life, discovers that she is one of the Chosen.  She infiltrates a school where the children are being immunized, and takes one hostage so she can confront their parents about the unfairness of the system.  The doctor doing the immunizations is dealing with his own guilt, as he had personally injected one of the Chosen at the beginning of his career and was his personal physician for years.  Can the situation be defused with only one death?

“Two Fallen In War”  Many years ago, two men met in World War Two, and a series of incidents bound them together.  Now, are those same circumstances repeating with their grandsons?  Questions of fate and intention intertwine.   Surprisingly, incontinence is a key point.

In the frame story, war threatens, and the Thought Bureau is finally concluding their investigation.  Fujimoto must finally confront his misgivings about the National Prosperity Law and the injustice inherent in the system.  He makes a decision, but what will that decision be?

One of the  interesting aspects of the series is that other than the dystopian aspects, the alternate Japan’s culture is virtually identical to our world’s, with the same social ills and crime rate.   In other words, the supposed benefits of the ikigami system are in fact pointless.

This series is marketed to the seinen (young men) demographic in Japan and has some intense violent scenes and generally mature readers subject matter.  One chapter contains an attempted rape.  Parents should heed the “mature readers” label.

Many of the cases presented are tear-jerkers, and intensely dramatic.  The art style is suited for the subject matter.  The final volume is due out in August 2014, but tentatively I recommend this series for fans of dramatic fiction.

Manga Review: Rin-ne

Manga Review: Rin-ne by Rumiko Takahashi

Sakura Mamiya is not quite your normal high school girl.  Due to a near-death experience as a child, Sakura can see spirits.  One day, she meets the new boy in her class, Rinne Rokudo.  She mistakes him for a spirit at first, but the truth is a bit more complicated.

Rin-ne #13

Rinne is a ”shinigami” (death spirit), a not so grim reaper whose job it is to move ghosts on to the afterlife.  However, his ancestry is partially mortal human, which means that he is much weaker than normal shinigami and must use artificial means (often expensive ones) to duplicate their natural powers.  Between that, bad luck, and having his name fraudulently placed as a co-signer on his father’s extensive debts, Rinne is grindingly poor.

Sakura befriends Rinne, and often helps him with his cases.  While she doesn’t have any special abilities beyond spirit sensing, Sakura’s cool head and common sense often come in handy dealing with wacky spirit hijinks.  In the standard Takahashi fashion, more and more quirky characters pop up and refuse to go away for long.

This series uses some of the same supernatural folklore as Takahashi’s last work, Inuyasha, but does not have an over-arcing plot as such, featuring individual stories and short arcs instead.  Rinne is considerably less of a jerk than most of Takahashi’s previous shounen protagonists, and Sakura is much less ill-tempered than many of their female leads.  The obstacles to their budding love are more circumstantial.

Rin-ne is a lighthearted series, despite the constant presence of death.  Many of the situations are silly, even if everyone in the story takes them seriously.

In the volume I have to hand, #13,  Rinne’s deadbeat dad needs to borrow money to pay for something, which leads to the question of what he values so much that he’d be willing to actually shell out payment.  Rinne has several encounters with Right and Left, moon rabbit people who run a scythe repair shop…badly.  Then Rinne is framed for robbery.

In addition, there’s a story set in a dessert buffet, and seasonal tales for Christmas and New Year’s Day.

There’s considerably less gratuitous fanservice than Takahashi’s earlier works, and despite the scythes and ghosts, most of the violence is slapstick.  The primary intended audience is middle-school and up boys, but girls should find it enjoyable too.

Book Review: Deathless

Book Review: Deathless  by Catherynne M. Valente

Marya Morevna is not like the other girls in Saint Petersburg/Petrograd/Leningrad.   She sees the husbands of her sisters while they are still birds.   But times are changing in Russia, now the Union of Soviet Socialistic Republics.   The People have no time for magic, and Marya does not see the bird that becomes her husband.   A pity, for this husband is named Koschei, and now she is snared in his story.

Deathless

Koschei the Deathless is a famous figure in Russian folktales, the sorcerer who has cut out his own heart, his death, and hidden it so that no man or thing can kill him.  In tale after tale, he falls in love with a beautiful woman, but she is in love with Ivan the Fool, and they find Koschei’s heart, no matter how well guarded.  There are variations to the tale, but they all end the same way.

This version is written by the author of The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland In a Boat of Her Own Making, and is set against the background of Russian history in the first half of the Twentieth Century.    The fairy tale creatures of Russian folklore have taken on new forms to match modern times.  Even Baba Yaga makes an appearance.

Marya is a complicated character.  Despite the rather disturbing courtship style of Koschei, Tsar of Life, she genuinely comes to love him, and helps him in his war with the Tsar of Death.  And yet she finds herself irresistibly drawn to her Ivan when he appears.  Marya wants to avoid the fate the story has for her, but makes decisions that drive her farther down that road.

Given that the non-graphic sex scenes dance on the line between rough sex and spousal abuse, I do not recommend this book below senior high level.  There’s also some very dubious consent that may trigger some readers.

For those who might be interested in Russian folklore, and fans of tragic romance.

Manga Review: The Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service

Manga Review: The Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service by Eiji Otsuka & Housui Yamazaki.

Five students at a Buddhist college discover that each of them has a talent or skill relating to death.  The corpse that brings about this revelation is restless, and they help it find peace.  In exchange it wills them just enough money to start their own business helping the dead fulfill their last wishes.

Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service

This is a quirky horror manga with some fun characters, chilling storylines and excellent art.  Many of the stories involve either twisted versions of Japanese urban legends, or real-life unusual aspects of modern Japanese culture.  For example, in Volume Thirteen, Sasaki (the team’s business manager and hacker) is drafted as a “lay judge” in a murder case, following changes in Japan’s trial system in 2009.

The series is put out in America by Dark Horse Manga, with the first thirteen volumes available in English.  There’s extensive footnotes in each volume, covering various subjects of interest and explaining references.  The cover designs are fairly distinctive as well.

There is frequent nudity in this series, both male and female, usually of corpses drawn with realistic injuries and in various stages of decay.  There’s also some disturbing violence and sexual situations; There’s relatively little of the usual fanservice, though.  The nudity serves plot purposes.  I would recommend this only for older teens and up.

Unfortunately, I am told that sales are poor, so this series may not continue in the U.S.  This is one series I would ask you to consider buying new if you can.

 

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