Comic Book Review: Showcase Presents: Rip Hunter…Time Master

Comic Book Review: Showcase Presents: Rip Hunter…Time Master written by Jack Miller

After the success of Jack Kirby creations The Challengers of the Unknown in 1959, DC Comics took a chance on two other quartets of non-powered adventurers in the pages of Showcase, their try-out comic.  The more successful of these was Rip Hunter’s team of time travelers.  He is introduced as already having invented a Time Sphere, and with the aid of his friend Jeff Smith built two of them.  The only people he’s trusted in his secret laboratory are his girlfriend Bonnie Baxter and her kid brother Corky.

Showcase Presents: Rip Hunter...Time Master

In the first Showcase appearance (#20, May 1959) Rip and Jeff take one of the spheres on its maiden voyage to the Mesozoic Era, 100 million years in the past.  Unfortunately, it turns out that two criminals stumbled on the lab some weeks before while the team was absent, realized this could be big, and planted a listening device.  The crooks force Bonnie and Corky to take them back to the same era as the first pair, planning to mine deposits of gold, silver and diamonds they know the location of in the present.

Between dinosaurs and active volcanic terrain, the six time travelers have a series of exciting escapes and daring deeds to accomplish before they can return to the present.  The tired and sore criminals are dismayed to find their hard-won sack of minerals empty–turns out you can’t bring any objects from the past forward.  (This rule was eventually quietly ignored, but no one ever thought to abuse that capability thereafter.)

Much like the later Doctor Who, the second storyline went straight to aliens as Rip and his pals investigated the origin of Atlantis.  Another pair of Showcase issues followed shortly, and in 1961, Rip Hunter got his own series.  Writer Jack Miller did some research to come up with interesting time periods, but historical accuracy was clearly not a high priority.  Each issue followed a three-part structure as a mystery from the past surfaced and the crew checked it out using a Time Sphere.  Often complications would arise due to the never-stated but obvious rule that they cannot change the past; attempts to do so would fail, meaning the team has to come up with a new plan.

Characterization is thin; all four main characters are brave and adventurous.  Rip is the main history expert, and a very good shot; as the Comics Code prevented him from killing humans, he would use trick shots to bring down awnings and such.  Jeff appears to be the mechanic; he’s the one who does the repairs on the Time Spheres and is slightly more muscular looking than Rip.  Bonnie and Corky appear to have no special skills beyond being backup sphere pilots.  Bonnie is a bit nervous at times, and Corky knows less history than the others, so is the recipient of infodumps.  Guest characters have just enough personality to fulfill their plot purposes.

Aliens and hidden civilizations are rife in these stories, and monsters appear frequently.  Magic is sometimes mentioned but almost always turns out to be fake or actually alien technology.

There are several art teams in the early going, the most notable of which features Joe Kubert.  Eventually it settled down to William Ely, who is decent enough, but perhaps could scale back the worry lines on some of the characters.

My favorite of the stories is their battle against the gods of Mount Olympus, which features Jeff being transformed into a griffin!

Later versions of Rip Hunter have shed the rest of his team; Legends of Tomorrow fans will likely find this early Rip nearly unrecognizable.

Recommended primarily to fans of more straightforward time travel stories as there’s seldom the creative abuses of the concept that have become common in literature since.

Anime Review: Magi: The Kingdom of Magic

Anime Review: Magi: The Kingdom of Magic

This is the sequel to last year’s Magi: The Magical Labyrinth so please see my review of that show, and the Magi manga if you don’t want to be spoiled for those.

Magi: The Kingdom of Magic

After defeating another dungeon, our heroes are in high spirits.  But soon new matters come up.  Prince Hakuryu must return to his homeland of Kou (basically dynastic China) as his father is dying.  Alibaba decides that he needs instruction in combining his swordsmanship with his djinn powers in Leam (roughly Imperial Rome.)  Morgiana wants to visit the place her tribe came from, even though no one lives there any more.  And Aladdin?  Well, he wants more magic training, so he’ll go undercover as a student to the land of Magnostadt, the only kingdom where wizards rule.

After some adventures getting to the continent where all these places are, the main characters split up, having separate adventures.  We mostly follow Aladdin, who may have great power as a magi, but needs much more training for finesse and versatility.  Magnostadt is a great place for wizards, but there are some strange things that don’t quite fit the outward image, and the city has a terrible cost for its power.  Also, one of Aladdin’s fellow students has a secret that could lead to global war–if El-Sarmen doesn’t bring about the end of the world first!

The most interesting new character in this storyline is Mogamett, leader of Magnostadt.  He clearly wants to be the Professor X of wizards, but has fallen into Magneto territory instead.   The contrast between his kindly demeanor and his cruel acts stuns Aladdin, and me as well.

The biggest weakness of this season is the absence of Morgiana through most of it.  Her quest is left hanging about halfway through, then we don’t see her until  the penultimate episode, when she shows up out of the blue with a new power.  At least Alibaba got to show up a few episodes earlier for some character development.

The manga is not yet complete, so the series ends on a sequel hook in case it gets renewed for another season.

Aladdin continues his obsession with breasts, and the script obliges him every so often.  On the good side, we get a bit more skin tone variation.

If you liked the first season, you should enjoy this one too.

Manga Review: Magi #1

Manga Review: Magi #1 by Shinobu Ohtaka

In a setting not unlike the Middle Eastern tales of the Arabian Nights, there is a boy named Aladdin.   He’s lived in isolation until now, so he doesn’t know much about the outside world, or how society works.  Soon, Aladdin meets a drifter named Alibaba, who’s a poor laborer now, but dreams of conquering a dungeon, a mysterious trap-laden building filled with treasure.

Magi #1

After some difficulties with Alibaba’s current client, the wine merchant Budel, and a run-in with the local slavery laws, Alibaba and Aladdin find themselves with no place to go but the dungeon.  It’s filled with dangers, just as described, but more dangerous may be the rival group of treasure hunters….

This is the manga the previously reviewed anime Magi: The Magical Labyrinth was based on.  (Its sequel, Magi: The Kingdom of Magic is now airing.)   The manga starts with a solo adventure of Aladdin, in which he helps out a caravan; this was skipped in the anime to bring in Alibaba faster, and bits reused after the first storyarc.

Aladdin has a rather annoying breast fetish, and some fanservice comes up throughout.  As mentioned in the anime review, most of the characters are suspiciously pale-skinned for the Middle East setting and being out in the sun all the time.

That said, it’s a fun series that will later have a really interesting female character, Morgiana (she appears in this volume, but pre-character development.)

This will mostly appeal to fans of the anime, but might be worth looking into if you’re a fan of Arabian Nights style fantasy.

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