Book Review: How I Resist

Book Review: How I Resist edited by Tim Federle & Maureen Johnson

Disclaimer:  I received this advance uncorrected proof through a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review.  No other compensation was offered or requested.  As an uncorrected proof, there will be significant changes between this and the final product.

How I Resist

As I write these words, yet another school shooting has sparked an upsurge in student activism.  Thus the appearance in my mailbox of this collection of essays and interviews on activism and hope aimed at the young adult market was timely.  The selection of authors and artists includes such popular figures as Jodi Picoult and Javier Muñoz, plus a wide variety of folks I have never heard of but younger Americans may be more conversant with.

The first essay in the book is “Could We Please Give the Police Departments to the Grandmothers?” by Junauda Petrus which waxes lyrical about solving crime problems with stern looks and good food.  Very Afrofuturism.  Last is Karuna Riazi with “Refilling the Well”, which is about her emotional self-care while trying to change the world for the better.

One of the hazards of reading such an early proof of the book is that none of the interior illustrations are present, including the ones that are a contributor’s entire entry.  Also, there’s a comics trivia error in Maya Rupert’s essay about imagining a black Wonder Woman that I can’t tell if it’s the author’s or a typesetter glitch.  (Have I mentioned that I’m an annoying nerd about comics trivia?)

I do, however, like the cover with all the author bio pictures.  It does a good job of giving faces to the people writing and drawing these pieces.

This is a collection curated through a strong political lens for a particular type of young person.  If you are the sort of young adult who thinks the right person won in 2016 (Hillary’s loss hit several of the contributors hard); that America’s problems are caused by uppity women, dark-skinned people and “weirdos” being allowed to have a say; and that protests are only acceptable when you don’t have to see them, hear about them or be influenced by them in any way…this book will not go well with you.

Most of the contributions are interesting or thought-provoking–I’m a bit disappointed by Rosie O’Donnell going with a glorified tweet.  The editors have an introduction, mid-word and afterword, which is a bit much, and they come off as trying too hard to be “woke” and “down with the young people.”

There’s a list of suggested reading in the back, ranging from 1984 to We Should All Be Feminists.

Consider this one as a gift for a teenager or college student who’s into political or social activism.  Older readers might want to pick it up if you are a fan of one of the contributors.

Book Review: Inferior

Book Review: Inferior by Angela Saini

Disclaimer:  I received this Uncorrected Page Proof as a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review.  No other compensation was requested or offered.  Some material may be changed in the final product, due out 5/23/17.

Inferior

Today there was a news story about a member of the European Parliament arguing against equal pay for women on the grounds that “they are weaker, they are smaller, they are less intelligent.”  Unsurprisingly, this MEP was male.  Equally unsurprising was the tongue-lashing he got from a fellow MEP who happened to be female.  But while it’s unusual for a theoretically respectable politician to say these things in public nowadays, it is a current of thought that stretches back to at least the ancient Greeks.  And often science has been misused to justify such attitudes.

This book is mostly about the science of sex differences (that is, “how are men and women different?”) and how that science has been interpreted over the years to justify sexism and resistance to social change on the subject, but also about contrary evidence and theories that paint a more egalitarian picture.  The author is an award-winning British science journalist who was assigned to write a piece on menopause but found enough material for this book.

The book begins with Charles Darwin claiming that women were less evolved than men for reasons.   Then it covers multiple subjects such as brain imaging and primatology on the way to the riddle of why women don’t just die when they become infertile.  (The last has two major competing hypotheses named “The Grandmother Hypothesis” and “The Patriarch Hypothesis”; all the scientists that have gone on record as supporting the latter are male.)

There’s a reference list for each chapter, and will be an index in the final product.  There may be illustrations in the published version; there were none in the proof copy.

A repeated theme of the book is the suggestion that many sex difference researchers started from “essentialism”, the basic assumption that men and women are different in fundamental ways, and then did their research in such a way as to disproportionately focus on the ways the sexes are different, rather than similar, and sometimes even finding differences that don’t appear to actually exist.  It’s also notable that several male researchers come across as dismissive of research done by scientists (particularly women) whose results contradict their own theories.  One, for example, admits that he’s never studied bonobos himself, but clearly  the research results found by a woman must be wrong since it’s different from what he learned by studying chimpanzees.

The writing is clear and concise, and should be readable by bright high school students on up (although some parents may find parts of the subject matter, such as the existence of intersex people, uncomfortable.)  Recommended to those interested in science, feminism and the intersection of the two.

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