Manga Review: Dawn of the Arcana 1

Manga Review: Dawn of the Arcana 1 by Rei Toma

Princess Nakaba has bright red hair.  This is not a rare hair color in her homeland of Senan; indeed it’s all too common.  Both in Senan and its southern neighbor Belquat, all the nobility and royalty have pure black hair.  Her flaming tresses suggest that Nakaba is the product of an affair with a peasant, or some weakness in her family line.  Thus she has long been shunned and mistreated by her royal relatives.

Dawn of the Arcana 1

When the time comes for a political marriage to quell the periodic military tension between Belquat and Senan, Nakaba is chosen for the task as a deliberate slap in the face to both her and the royal family of Belquat.  The brides in these marriages tend to turn up dead in suspicious circumstances a few years later, so sending Princess Nakaba both tells her how expendable she is, and informs Belquat that their princes are not worthy of purebred wives.

Prince Caesar of Belquat isn’t too thrilled with this marriage either.  He’s the younger son of the royal family, but also has a claim on the throne as Prince Cain is the son of a concubine, while Caesar’s mother is fully married to the king.  His mother’s people are scheming to make him the heir, but Prince Caesar has no interest in ruling Belquat when Cain could do a perfectly adequate job.  Caesar is not a particularly talented warrior, and has won what combat skills he has by long practice.

Princess Nakaba’s sole ally at court (at least at the beginning) is her servant Loki, who has been with her since childhood.  Loki is a member of the Ajin race, humanoids with animalistic ears and tails.  Their senses are sharper than ordinary humans, and their great strength and superior reflexes make them natural warriors.  Ajin are an underclass who are allowed to be servants at best, and are often massacred to keep their numbers down.  Loki is devoted to Nakaba, not least because he knows she has a hidden power called “Arcana” that is about to blossom.

This shoujo fantasy manga was first published in 2009.  There’s heavy romance elements as Nakaba and Caesar must try to make their marriage work despite being enemies, and deal with the passions of other people who have their own love or political objectives.

This first volume has three long chapters.  We first meet the royal couple shortly after the official wedding ceremony.  They don’t like each other, but have to put a polite face on in public and both are trying to make the marriage work to the extent that’s possible.  Princess Nakaba makes an etiquette blunder at her first dinner with the new family,  King Guran takes the opportunity to sentence Loki to death (he really hates the Ajin) but the servant is able to escape.

While Prince Caesar is no fan of the Ajin either, he does pledge to get the death sentence revoked if Loki shows his loyalty to Nakaba by returning to her before dawn.  Loki does, and Caesar stands by his promise.  However, the way the promise is fulfilled in no way endears Loki to Caesar.  Despite that, this marks a turning point in Nakaba and Caesar’s relationship as they begin to see each other’s positive traits.

I’ve looked ahead a bit, and there are many plot twists to come, starting with the true nature of Princess Nakaba’s Arcana.

The art is decent, as is the writing.  There’s a certain amount of violence, so the publisher has rated this series as “Teen.”  There are a couple of forceful kisses, but Caesar backs off his insistence on enjoying his “marriage rights” when Nakaba puts up a fight.

Recommended for fans of fantasy romance.

Book Review: Scammunition

Book Review: Scammunition by Colleen J. Pallamary

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway for the purpose of writing this review.  No other compensation was requested or received.

Scammunition

Colleen Pallamary has been working as a volunteer to protect senior citizens and others from scams and swindles for over a decade in Florida.  This book is designed to inform people about the most common tricks she has encountered and how to combat them.  It’s arranged in short chapters covering such topics as phony contractors, fraudulent travel agencies (and employment scams promising to make you a travel agent) and malware.

To be honest, most of this is pretty basic material that would seem like common sense–but scammers still catch people with these tricks every day.  It’s certainly worth reading through just to refresh your memory.  About a third of the book is a listing of Better Business Bureau offices and government agency contact information for the United States and its territories, which will be especially helpful if you are dealing with a multi-state scam operation.  Although this book was published in 2012, these sorts of addresses tend not to change so the vast majority of them should still be good.

However, the chapters on cybercrime have already become a little dated–check the latest government warnings for new angles con artists have found.

This book was self-published, and it’s very obvious with the heavy use of public domain clip art, pithy mottoes and reproduction of government forms.  I did not spot any obvious typos, which is a huge plus at this end of the market.  Those with e-readers may want to go with the cheaper electronic version as there’s no real loss of quality.

Recommended for seniors, soon-to-be seniors, and close relatives of seniors, but usable by any adult who wants to be careful with their money and credit.

Magazine Review: Cosmic Crime Stories July 2012

Magazine Review: Cosmic Crime Stories July 2012 edited by Tyree Campbell

If you want to stand out in the crowded field of speculative fiction, one of the ways is “genre-blending,” taking two different popular genres and splicing them together.  For example, horror and romance to create the vampire love stories so immensely popular in recent times.  This twice-yearly magazine blends science fiction and crime fiction.

Cosmic Crime Stories July 2012

“Suttee” by Tyree Campbell leads this issue off.    (When you’re the editor you can decide what order the stories go in.)  Sweeney is a smuggler whose husband was recently killed.   She’s going on one last run, but what’s her end game?  Much of the story is her verbal sparring with an authority figure who doesn’t understand her motivation.

“The Price of Selfishness” by Robert Collins is set on the frontier of space, as a merchant’s prank results in murder.  Captain Jason Ayers must investigate the matter, and determine what sort of justice the alien perpetrator will face.  The local law enforcement shoves the matter off on him, and then doesn’t like the result.

“Perfect Vengeance” by Kellee Kranendonk takes place in a society where the aged are despised.  Shae was one of the few space captains left over forty; until her crew mutinied, shooting her and stranding her and her younger lover on a supposedly barren planet.  Said planet is not nearly as deserted as it appeared, and the locals’ society has an important difference that allows Shae a kind of revenge.  This story suffered badly from not having the background better explained.

“All Tomorrow’s Suckers: Robert Bloch’s Speculative Crimes” by Daniel R. Robichaud.   This short article looks at some of the Psycho author’s more speculative crime fiction, including the series about Lefty Feep, a not quite successful con artist whose schemes always involved science fiction or fantasy gimmicks.

“The Faithless, the Tentacled and the Light” by Mary E. Lowd concerns Nicole Merison, captain of the Hypercube and a rescue mission the government asks her to undertake.  The mission evokes complex emotions, as the captured person is her ex-friend who got her fired from a dream job.  Turns out Cora misinterpreted an important detail of alien biology/technology, so she may deserve to stay….

“No Good Deed Goes Unpunished” by Wayne Carey stars an attorney named Murph, who is called in to defend his cousin Tom Finnegan from charges he carelessly activated an experimental device that destroyed the space station he was on and killed dozens of people.  Murph isn’t really that good of a lawyer, having only won one case before via applied bribery.  That won’t work here, and it gets worse when he discovers that a) Tom’s employers have bailed on the scientist, leaving him holding the bad, and b) local laws requite the attorney to suffer the same penalty as his client.  The locals still have the death penalty for murder.   The fun is watching Murph dig himself out of this hole and win the case mostly honestly.  It feels good, but remember the title.

“Rarified Air: Big City Policing, Year 3000” by Marilyn K. Martin is a police procedural.  In the overcrowded future, only the wealthy can afford to live in buildings high enough to see the sky.  They’re somewhat insulated from law enforcement by the politics of the day, and when a multiple widow reports that her latest husband has gone missing, the cops must tread lightly.

There are a few house ads for Sam’s Dot Publishing and a couple of illustrations by Denny Marshall which don’t go with specific stories.

The Wayne Carey story is the best of the lot, which are mostly middling good.  This magazine might be worth looking up if you like the intersection of SF and crime.

Book Review: First Polish Reader (Volume 2)

Book Review: First Polish Reader (Volume 2) by Wiktor Kopernikas

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

This is a book of simple stories in both Polish and English, designed to help students learn to read Polish.  It’s printed by Language Practice Publishing, and uses something called the ALARM (Approved Learning Automatic Remembering Method) which relies on repeating words to build vocabulary.

First Polish Reader

There is no pronunciation guide, as this is not a basic textbook, but it lists the new words from each story, and at the back there are both Polish/English and English/Polish glossaries.  There will be audio tracks of the chapters available on lppbooks.com, but as of this writing only the first volume’s tracks are up.

The stories themselves are simple, and mildly amusing, starting with pet stories and building from there.  For the most part, they avoid slang and phrases that don’t translate literally.  However, there is one major exception.  In the story “Tort”, an eight year old tries to bake a cake.  One of the ingredients is kulinarnym klejem, “culinary glue.”  She mistakenly puts in wood glue instead.  However, the term we would use in English is “shortening” which would not lead to such a mistake.

The book does what it is written to do, but is not an exceptional volume of its kind.  Check with your Polish teacher to see if this is an acceptable supplement to your language learning.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...