Comic Book Review: Static Shock: Rebirth of the Cool

Comic Book Review: Static Shock: Rebirth of the Cool written by Dwayne McDuffie & Robert L. Washington III, art by Denys Cowan & John Paul Leon

Static is Virgil Ovid Hawkins, a science-loving teenager exposed to an experimental gas that gave him electro-magnetic superpowers.  He protects his schoolmates and neighborhood against gangs and supervillains who were also powered up by the gas.   Now if he could find the time to also have a normal teenage life!

Static shock: Rebirth of the Cool

Static was the most successful character to come out of the Milestone Comics line, an attempt to showcase African-American comics creators and more diverse characters in superhero comics.  He was a blend of early Spider-Man (nerdy teenager who is bullied at school, wisecracker, prone to bad luck) with concerns familiar to black teenagers in the 1990s.  He went on to have a Saturday morning cartoon, Static Shock, that ran for four seasons before being cancelled because the toy companies couldn’t figure out how to merchandise it.

Although Milestone had ceased publishing in 1997, the popularity of the TV series allowed for a four-issue miniseries that was a “where are they now” for the characters, centering on Static.

This volume reprints the first four issues of the original Static  series, as well as the Rebirth of the Cool miniseries.

The story opens with Static already having operated in his Dakota neighborhood for a month or so, and being appreciated by the locals.   Some hoods are hassling Frieda, the girl Virgil likes, and Static interferes.  After this triumph, Virgil heads home and we meet his skeptical mother and annoying little sister Sharon.  (Virgil’s father works long hours at the hospital and we see little of him in these issues.)

Next day at school, Virgil meets up with his friends, including the suave Larry and the sensitive Rick (who is the target of homophobic comments, even though the person doing so isn’t sure Rick is gay.)  Virgil asks Larry for relationship advice, as he is thinking of asking Frieda out.  Larry warns that Frieda may already be seeing someone, but Virgil scoffs.

The previous hoodlums invade the school to capture Frieda (popular girl!) and take her to a nearby abandoned playground.  Their leader, Hotstreak, is interested in her (but not vice versa), and in luring in Static for a fight.  With his powers of speed and fire, Hotshot beats Static badly, then leaves to bask in his triumph.  Frieda is surprised to learn that Static is really her friend Virgil.

At Frieda’s place, Virgil gets patched up and tells his origin story.  Some time before, he was new at Ernest Hemingway High School (the Hawkins family had moved from a worse neighborhood) when he ran afoul of a gangbanger nicknamed Biz Money B.  Virgil’s friend Larry advised him that he would continue to be victimized unless Virgil stopped the bullying permanently.

Not actively engaged in the local gangs himself, but “connected”, Larry knew of a turf war going on.  There was going to be a huge throwdown of all the gangs on Paris Island the next night.  If Biz Money B just happened to die during it, end of problem.  Larry provided Virgil with an address and a disposable gun.

Come the actual event, Virgil found himself unable to murder a man, no matter how awful.   But before he could retreat, the cops raided the battle and doused the assembled gangs with what was supposed to be riot gas.  It’s actually “Q-juice”, an experimental chemical developed by Alva Enterprises.  (Alva Enterprises is the bad guys at this point in time.)  Those who survive inhaling it gain superpowers.

This includes Virgil, who uses his newfound electromagnetic abilities to evade capture by Alva Enterprises goons.  Unlike most “Bang Babies”, who started out as criminals in the first place, Virgil decided to use his powers for good as Static.

Explanations given and a pep talk from Frieda later, Static has a rematch with Hotstreak (who of course is the former Biz Money B) and easily defeats him.   Virgil then asks Frieda for a date, but is turned down.  (Turns out she’s dating Larry.)  They remain friends.

The next two issues have Static battling Tarmack, the living road, and Holocaust, a flame-wielding villain who picked the name deliberately to be offensive.   Holocaust is a would-be crimelord, and tries to sell Static on the idea of working with him against “The Man” who’s keeping them down.  Holocaust talks a good game, and Static is not particularly blind to how systemic racism is a factor in his life.  But the villain soon shows his true ruthless nature, and Static dissolves the partnership.

When I first read this back in the early Nineties, I wasn’t all that impressed.  I was tiring of angsty teen heroes, and Virgil’s personality can be a bit much.  But the writing rapidly improved, and the more realistic look at life in a multicultural neighborhood made the book stand out from the mainstream comics equivalents.  The coloring is of special note–Milestone used a new coloring process that allowed more subtlety in hues, so that not all black people had to have the same skin tone.

The mini-series picks up some months after we last saw Static in his own series.   Virgil has retired from superheroing after losing a partner, and is catching up on his civilian life, including having a new girlfriend.   This can’t last, of course.   Someone is kidnapping Bang Babies and other superhumans.

They’ve already taken down the Blood Syndicate (morally complex gang), and crippled Hardware (the local equivalent to Iron Man.)   Icon (the local equivalent to Superman) is out in space, Xombi (regenerator) only handles occult weirdness, and the Shadow Cabinet (secret society of superhumans) is officially hands off.  That just leaves the Heroes, Static’s old team, and without his powers, they’re not doing so hot, having just lost one of their most powerful members.

Virgil is begged to come back to active duty, but refuses until inevitably the baddies stumble across him while hunting other Bang Babies.  He briefly assumes a costume that looks like the cartoon before returning to his more usual garb, and leads the remaining heroes (including some unofficially seconded Shadow Cabinet members) to find the missing superhumans.

The investigation leads to someone with a shocking tie to Earth’s first superheroes, the Tower Family, and a small army of that person’s minions, powered up by the very Bang Babies they’ve kidnapped!

It’s nice seeing many favorite characters again, including the love-to-hate omnicognitive Dharma.  (“I’m not going to tell you anything.  Because I know the minute I leave the room, Iron Butterfly will tell you everything you need.”)   Because this is a Static-centric story, the other characters give him more respect than is perhaps warranted by their history.

I’m not fond of the art, as the inks tend to the blobby, losing subtlety in facial expressions.

Good ending, though.

I understand that there’s a Milestone event coming up from DC comics, so now may be the time to look up this bit of the backstory.

And now, the openings from the cartoon:

 

Manga Review: Haikyu!! 1

Manga Review: Haikyu!! 1 by Haruichi Furudate

It is the first game of the junior high boys’ volleyball tournament, between Kitagawa Daiichi Middle School and Yukigaoka Middle School.  While the first school is known for its strong volleyball program, the other…isn’t.  Yet the stars on each team have something in common.

Haikyu!! 1

Shoyo Hinata of Yukigaoka has been in love with volleyball since he saw a particularly thrilling game on television as a child.  A relatively short player nicknamed “the Little Giant” showed his skills leading Karasuno High School to victory.  This inspired the undersized Hinata, and he began practicing his skills.  But his school didn’t have a boys’ team, and he turned down the offer to join the girls’ team.  So for several years he was the only member of the volleyball club.  In this, his final year, he’s finally scraped together enough members (including loaners from other sports teams) to enter the winter tournament.  Pity none of the other team members has skills!

We don’t learn as much yet about Tobio Kageyama’s background, but he’s got a reputation for being a natural genius at volleyball, called “The King of the Court.”  The catch is that his Kitagawa teammates gave him that nickname not for his skills, but for being a royal brat who is the “I” in “team.”  His attitude is sour, but he’s the only one who respects Hinata as an opponent.

The game is a blowout, of course, but Hinata encourages his team even though they let him down time after time, while Kageyama berates his team for being less than perfect.  Despite Hinata’s despair at losing the only full volleyball game he’ll get to play in junior high, his team feels better about their loss than Kitagawa does about their win.  Hinata marks Kageyama as his arch-rival and promises they’ll meet again in the high school tournaments.  Kitagawa is soon eliminated from the tournament as well, though Hinata barely notices the news.

Hinata chooses to go to Karasuno High School, a half hour away by bicycle, because of his memories of the televised game, even though he has heard their volleyball program is not as good as it used to be.  He is shocked to discover that Kageyama is also attending the school, even though he should have been getting a full scholarship from the school district’s top volleyball high.  Kageyama angrily explains that he was rejected, but does not elaborate.

The two immediately begin quarreling, which causes some issues with the vice-principal.  Daichi Sawamura, the volleyball team captain, bans both of the rookies from the team until they’ve learned to work together.  This will be shown in a three-on-three match.  Hinata and Kageyama will be teamed up with the thuggish-looking (but really a huge goofball) Ryunosuke Tanaka, while Daichi will be with the other two rookies, who haven’t been introduced yet.

Can the short kid with speed and jumping skill learn to work with the genius setter in time?

This popular sports manga appears in Shounen Jump Weekly and has had three seasons of anime adaptation.  Volleyball (haikyuu in Japanese) was one of the first sports to get an ongoing manga/anime in the form of Attack! Number One and remains a popular sport in Japan.

The story gives us two protagonists who both must learn teamwork for different reasons, but slightly disguises it by having them set up as rivals in the first chapter.  Hinata’s easier to like, but has a tendency to stick with boneheaded decisions well past the point it’s clear they’re not working out.  Kageyama is quick to point out that never giving up doesn’t work if you don’t have the skills and strength to pull it off.  The taller boy, meanwhile, has to learn how to adapt to the teammates he actually has, rather than expect everyone to match his level.

The rest of the Karasuno team is the usual assortment of quirky types; the most developed in this volume is Tanaka.  His skinhead haircut and habit of sneering at people he doesn’t know makes Tanaka look like a troublemaker, but he’s actually just very intense and a hopeless romantic.

As is common in boys’ sports manga, the only named female character in the first volume is Kiyoko Shimizu, the pretty but shy team manager.  Tanaka is open about his crush on her, which she tactfully ignores.  It’ll be quite a while (I’ve seen the anime) before we get any others worth mentioning.

The Karasuno High School vice-principal is very much a stock character, pompous, obstructive and wearing a bad toupee; thankfully he mostly goes away after this volume.

This first volume is mostly about introducing characters and setting up the initial conflicts; it will be a while before the manga gets to the serious sports action.  We also get little bits of explanation about volleyball for the new reader, and character profiles indicating strong and weak points for the cast.

The art is generally good, with strong crow motifs for the Karasuno team, but every so often the artist uses “crazy eyes” when he shouldn’t.

There’s little here that should be objectionable for sports-minded middle-schoolers on up, with strong themes of persistence, teamwork and (eventually) friendship.  Recommended primarily to young volleyball fans.

Let’s have the opening for the first anime season!

Book Review: Octavia’s Brood

Book Review: Octavia’s Brood edited by Adrienne Maree Brown and Walidah Imarisha

One of the many uses of science fiction is to talk about current issues in a speculative setting.  One can posit a world in which current trends have become exaggerated to dystopian levels, or where a solution has been found to a current problem and what that would result in, or imagine how a change in the past would affect an issue…or even just go the allegory route by, say, having anti-Martian prejudice stand in for anti-immigrant prejudice of the current day.

Octavia's Shadow

This anthology is dedicated to science fiction stories on the theme of social justice issues.  It’s dedicated to the memory of Octavia Butler (1947-2006) a Hugo-winning author of works that touched on such themes as racism, alienation and the environment.  There are twenty stories and two essays by a variety of experienced and first-time authors.

The first story is “Revolution Shuffle” by Bao Phi.  Two Vietnamese-American young people in the middle of a zombie apocalypse are about to liberate an internment camp for Asian and Middle Eastern-descended people.  It seems that in this future, the zombie infestation was declared a terrorist attack, and the most likely suspects were locked up in special facilities to maintain zombie-attracting pistons “for their own protection.”  It reads like the first chapter of a YA dystopia novel.

The last fictional story is “children who fly” by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha.  It’s a future starring her daughter in a globally-warmed Oakland, trying to preserve what’s left of the community through group disassociation.  “Evidence” by Alexis Pauline Gumbs also uses heavy author insertion in foretelling a future where material goods are no longer important but personal growth is.

Several stories are clearly in the Afrofuturism mode, such as “Lalibela” by Gabriel Teodros, about a time-traveling Ethiopian king.

The most stylistically interesting piece is “Sanford and Sun” by Dawolu Jahari Anderson, which is a script format tale about junk dealer Fred G. Sanford encountering cosmic funk musician and philosopher Sun Ra.  It’s a neat concept, but the “jokes” reminded me of just how much Redd Foxx’s comedic delivery skills carried the Sanford and Son show.  Without specifically imagining him in the role at all times, the lines fall flat.

Some of the stories feel like incomplete fragments.  “Aftermath” by LeVar Burton (about an African-American scientist developing a cure for Parkinson’s Disease, only to be kidnapped by people who want to skin her alive) and “Fire on the Mountain” by Terry Bisson (an alternate history where the Civil War went very differently indeed) are open about this as they are previews of longer books.  Others come off as essays more than stories.

Of the stories in this volume, the one I liked best was “The Long Memory” by Morrigan Phillips.  It takes place in an archipelago where people known as Memorials can access the memories of the Memorials who have come before them, back to the beginning of their line.  These Memorials have become an important part of the society as the rulers must consult them and their knowledge of history before each important decision.

A wealthy and ambitious politician has become an enemy of the Memorials for reasons including the fact that they remember his ideas turn out badly.  He manages to get enough of the government on his side to imprison the Memorials.

The protagonist organizes a hunger strike in an effort to bring the politician to the negotiating table (and also to remind the people that the Memorials have been locked up.)  She naturally wants herself and her colleagues to be freed, but also comes to the realization that the people of the Archipelago have leaned on the Memorials for long-term memory so much that they’ve lost the capacity to remember history for themselves.

The essays are “Star Wars and the American Imagination” by Mumia Abu-Jamal, which is about pretty much what you’d think, and “The Only Lasting Truth”  by Tananarive Due, which is about Octavia Butler herself, her work, and her legacy.

There’s also a foreword, introduction and outro discussing the themes and importance of the works included, and a set of author bios.

This collection is “important” more than “good”; the quality of submissions is uneven, but they are nevertheless interesting to read and contemplate, and I look forward to seeing the future work of many of these authors.  If you have an interest in social justice themes or Afrofuturism, please consider picking this book up.

 

Anime Review: My Love Story

Anime Review: My Love Story

Takeo Goda is a freshman in high school, but you’d never guess it to look at him.  He’s over six feet tall and built like a truck.  His heart is as big as the rest of him, and Takeo often helps others in need.  Unfortunately, he’s not exactly handsome, and comes off as intimidating to most people who don’t know him well.  Every girl Takeo has had a crush on has instead wanted to go out with his handsome best friend Suna.  Suna’s turned them all down for some reason.

My Love Story

One day Takeo sees a petite girl named Rinko Yamato being hassled by a groper on the train.  Ignoring the tradition of not making a scene, Takeo grabs the man and hauls him to the police officer at the next stop.  At first the groper plays the innocent victim of a huge bully, but when Rinko verifies Takeo and Suna’s story, he switches to blaming Rinko for wearing provocative clothing (her school uniform.)  Takeo loses his temper and punches the jerk.

Rinko starts hanging out with Suna and Takeo, and bringing them homemade treats (she’s a skilled dessert maker.)  Takeo is strongly attracted to Rinko, but assumes she’s interested in Suna like all the other girls.  And Suna doesn’t seem as down on her as he was with the others.  Takeo attempts to support this couple, and Suna is finally forced to trick Rinko into admitting out loud in Takeo’s presence that she is in fact interested in the big lug.  At that point, their love story truly begins.

This anime series is based on the shoujo (“girls'”) manga Ore Monogatari! (“My Story!” but with a very rough, masculine connotation), written by Kazune Kawahara and drawn by Aruko.  It’s a light-hearted romantic comedy with a sweet center.

Takeo’s a great guy, the sort of person who you want to have your back in a tough situation, which makes him popular with his male classmates.  But he can be a bit slow on the uptake, particularly when it comes to girls and how they feel about him.  He’s also quite pure-hearted, which makes the relationship move slowly.

Rinko is a sweet little lady whose love comes from her pure heart.  But her innocence can cause her to not understand other people’s motivations.  Rinko’s gobsmacked to learn that most girls don’t find Takeo handsome, for example.  She’s also very shy about expressing herself physically, and holding hands is a huge step for her and her boyfriend.

Suna is an interesting character in that he’s the bishounen (“pretty boy”) aloof fellow who is so often the love interest in shoujo manga.  But here he’s Takeo’s wingman, helping the young couple come together despite their mutual clumsiness.  He may be aromantic or even asexual; his stated reason for turning down all the girls is because they’d badmouthed Takeo to him, but he doesn’t seem interested in girls or boys even when they’re not jerks.  His friendship with Takeo is because the forthright and extroverted boy makes him laugh.

And there are a variety of quirky supporting characters, from the main couple’s classmates (one set of which get their own romance) to Takeo’s formidable mother.

The artwork works well with the sweet story.  That said, some viewers may find this series too sugary for their tastes.  I’ll note that My Love Story seems to have a larger male fanbase than most shoujo.  I’ve seen grown men reduced to sentimental tears during certain episodes.  This may be because male anime fans can more easily identify with the homely but good-hearted Takeo than the usual bishounen but kind of jerkish love interest.  This is pointed up towards the end of the anime when such a fellow appears who seems on the surface more suited to Rinko, but it’s clear to the viewer that he’s more concerned with what Rinko can do to support his career than in what she actually wants in a relationship.

There’s a bit of swimsuit fanservice, and Takeo’s butt gets exposed at one point.

If you’re looking for a soppy romance from the male point of view, this is a good choice.

 

 

 

Book Review: Ready Player One

Book Review: Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Wade Watts is a gunter.  That’s short for “Easter egg hunter,” which has nothing to do with the holiday.  Born into grinding poverty as the child of refugees in the energy-starved dystopian future, Wade was orphaned at an early age and put into the hands of a neglectful aunt living in a skyscraper trailer park/junk heap.  Gifted at repairing discarded and broken hardware, Wade’s one chance at getting out of this hardscrabble life is winning a contest.

Ready Player One

It seems that the billionaire creator of OASIS, the virtual reality that nearly everyone in the world uses for games, business and school, set up a game before his death.  James Donovan Halliday (Anorak on the internet) had a massive obsession with the pop culture of the 1980s, the decade he’d been a teen in.  The first person to solve a series of puzzles and complete tasks based on Eighties trivia, movies, games and music will inherit Halliday’s company and all its wealth.

Thus it is that Wade and his fellow gunters have also developed an obsession with the Eighties, as they scramble to be the first to find the Easter egg that will make its owner incredibly rich.  However, in five years no one has managed to pass the first gate.  Until, of course,  Wade stumbles across an obvious in retrospect clue.

In a bit of a surprise twist, he’s not the first to do so, but manages to be the first to accomplish the associated challenge.  The game shifts into overdrive as Wade (or rather his OASIS codename Parzival) becomes an overnight celebrity and target.  To win the contest he’s going to need more than a command of Monty Python jokes!  He may even need to go…outside.

This book reads like a young adult cyberpunk novel…written for geeky forty-somethings.  I’m a bit older than that, but still managed to get most of the references due to having been very geeky during the 1980s.  One of the notes that makes it obvious this is a book for grownups is that our protagonist gets a day job to pay his bills so he can devote time to being a gunter.

The main villains of the story are the IOI corporation and its Oology Division.  IOI wants the cash cow that is OASIS, and to make it “pay to play”, shutting out poor people like Wade and the others who live in the Stacks.  (They’ve already managed to get laws passed to legalize indentured servitude.)  IOI is fully willing to use its monetary and manpower resources to gain unfair advantage over ordinary gunters, and Wade soon discovers just how far the corporation will go to have its way.

Wade starts the story already gifted in the skills and knowledge he’ll need to accomplish his goal…except interpersonal relationship skills.  His background has made Parzival a paranoid solo operator, and over the course of the novel he must learn to build bonds of friendship with the other elite gunters he meets.  A common theme is that all of these people only know each other from virtual reality, and their avatars conceal (or reveal) important information about their true selves.

Though we wouldn’t have a story without it, I can’t help feeling that if Mr. Halliday had found some way of getting people to work on solving the “real world” problems of the dystopian future as hard as they were trying to perfectly recreate the 1980s in cyberspace, things wouldn’t be nearly as bad for Wade and others.  At least one of the gunters, Art3mis, does intend to use the money to try to fix things.

Apparently future society has stagnated or regressed on certain civil issues, back to the Nineties or so.  There’s also references to offpage sex.  It should be okay for junior high readers on up, but the heavy emphasis on things that were cool back in their parents’ time might be off-putting.

Recommended primarily to geeky forty-somethings, with some overlap for geeks on either side of “80s kids”.

Manga Review: Platinum End 1

Manga Review: Platinum End 1 Story by Tsugumi Ohba, Art by Takeshi Obata

Have you ever looked at the world around you and thought, “Wow, God’s not doing a very good job.”?  Perhaps you have even succumbed to hubris and thought you could do a better job if you, personally, had God’s power.  As it turns out, God’s retiring and has assigned thirteen angels to seek out candidates for the open position.  Each will be able to give their candidate special powers, and there will be a 999-day competition period, at the end of which the new God will be chosen.  Special rank angel Nasse already has someone in mind.

Platinum End 1

Which brings us to our protagonist, Mirai Kakehashi.  He’s introduced to us by tossing himself off a building on the day he graduates from middle school.  Seems that Mirai is an orphan whose life has been made utterly miserable by his abusive relatives (yes, shades of Harry Potter) and now that he’s past mandatory school age, aunt and uncle want him to get a job and sign over the paycheck in return for their “generosity.”  Nasse catches Mirai before he hits the pavement.

The angel explains that she has been keeping an eye on Mirai for a while as his “guardian angel” and she is at last able to intervene to make him happy.  Nasse grants him three nifty powers; wings to fly, red arrows that will make people love him, and white arrows that kill painlessly.  Mirai isn’t too sure about this, especially as Nasse suggests using these powers in ways that seem…unethical to the boy.  He does, however, wind up using the red arrows to resolve the issue of his abusive relatives.

Now that Mirai has a future again, he works hard to get into the same school as his crush, Saki.  While that’s going on, Nasse explains more about the “replace God” contest, and they become aware of a God candidate who is most definitely abusing his powers.  This story doesn’t really intersect with theirs, as he’s quickly taken out by a third candidate, who has decided to murder his way to victory.

“Metropoliman” uses his powers to appear to be a superhero so that he can  openly hunt for the other candidates with the public on his side.  This makes Mirai worried, but the murderous “hero” isn’t his top priority when a fourth candidate turns out to be going to the same high school.  A candidate who’s gotten the drop on him!

This monthly manga is by the creators of Death Note and Bakuman, and was much anticipated.   The art is certainly excellent!  But large chunks of the premise seem to have been lifted from the Future Diary series, and several of the characters in these early chapters are kind of blah.  In particular, Ohba seems to struggle with the right balance of competence and initiative for female characters.  I am hoping that future chapters will improve this.

That said, Nasse has a lot of potential as an angelic creature that doesn’t quite grok human morality.  Her design which makes it difficult to tell whether she’s wearing clothes or just has an unusual body is also nifty.

Content issues:  In addition to frequent mentions of suicide (and one on-camera attempt) and child abuse, there’s rape and female nudity in a sexual context.  While the series is aimed at high schoolers in Japan, it gets a “Mature Readers” tag in the U.S.

Primarily recommended to fans of the creators’ previous series.  Consider getting the physical edition–there are some neat effects on the cover that don’t come across in a scan.

Comic Book Review: Blue Monday, Vol. 2: Absolute Beginners

Comic Book Review: Blue Monday, Vol. 2: Absolute Beginners by Chynna Clugston Flores

Disclaimer:  I received this volume through a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review.  No other compensation was offered or requested.


Bleu L. Finnegan isn’t precisely your normal high school girl growing up in 1990s Northern California.  For one thing, there’s the blue hair, which she’s had since at least elementary school (though it’s not clear if it’s natural.)  She’s also way more into then-contemporary musicians than the average person, and most of the people she hangs out with are equally excited about such things.

Bleu is also very typical of teenage girls, simultaneously interested in and disgusted by teenage boys, and with a schoolgirl crush on handsome Jefferson High teacher Mr. Bishop.  Oh, and for some reason a pooka named Seamus has taken an interest in her.  Maybe not so typical after all.

This was Chynna Clugston Flores’ first series, created when she was barely older than the characters she was writing.  It had a manga-esque art style back when that was uncommon and innovative.  It also had musical cues for which songs should be playing at any point in the story–I think that will be most evocative for Nineties kids, as some of the references have faded in the past twenty years.

In many ways, this is like a naughtier version of the classic Archie Comics formula; romantic hijinks, comedy and a touch of the supernatural.  The kids are rather more open about the sexual nature of their attractions, use more foul language than I am comfortable with (and yet sometimes use comic-book symbol swearing instead), and consume alcohol.  On the other hand, the teenagers are not actually sexually active (as of this volume), and the nudity tends to be peek-a-boo.

In this volume, a fancy-dress party is ruined by too much booze, which leads to a couple of the boys taking a video of Bleu bathing.  The fallout of this leads to continued embarrassment for our protagonist, as the contents of the video are vastly exaggerated by gossip.  One of the boys, Alan Jackson, finally admits he’s interested in Bleu and tries to ask her out on a date, despite the girls thrashing him in soccer.

That date turns into a disaster, largely because their friends are pulling a series of pranks on the couple.  Teenagers are mean!

It seems that whatever town Jefferson High is in, it has a high Irish-American population, though only Clover Connelly’s family appears to be directly from the Emerald Isle.  And then there’s “Monkeyboy” whose hairstyle hides his eyes at all times.

The art has been recolored by Jordie Bellaire, who did a very good job except for one obvious goof–or perhaps that happened in post-production.

This will, I think, most appeal to Nineties kids who enjoyed the series when it first appeared, but should be suitable for older teenagers on up who enjoy romantic comedy.

 

 

Manga Review: Shonen Jump Weekly (2016)

Manga Review: Shonen Jump Weekly (2016) by various creators.

It’s the fourth anniversary of this blog (where does the time go!?) and thus my annual review of the online edition of Weekly Shounen Jump, Japan’s best-selling manga anthology.   The 2016 reaper has been busy here as elsewhere, with several long-running series ending:  Bleach, Nisekoi, Toriko and even the record-setting but mostly unknown outside Japan Kochikame (a gag series about a lazy cop in a quiet neighborhood police station.)  World Trigger and Hunter x Hunter are on indefinite hiatus due to creator health issues.  So let’s take a look at what’s left, starting with the weekly series.

Weekly Shonen Jump (2016)

One Piece: Now the tentpole long-runner of the magazine, the story of the Straw Hat Pirates as they sail around a world of mostly water in search of freedom and the ultimate treasure continues to be awesome, though the cast is perhaps now too large to fully utilize all of them properly.  Currently, the plot is centered around Sanji, the ship’s cook and would-be ladies’ man.  His unpleasant family has caught up with him, and Sanji is being forced into a political marriage with Pudding, the daughter of Big Mom, one of the Four Emperors.  Naturally, the rest of the crew and a few new allies are determined to rescue Sanji…even if he doesn’t want to be.

My Hero Academia:  The kids of Class 1-A have almost all gotten their provisional superhero licenses.  One of the exceptions is the explosive Bakugou, who has almost but not quite figured out the connection between formerly Quirkless classmate Deku and the now powerless All-Might.  Bakugou and Deku are now having a discussion about their relationship, and in the tradition of both superhero comics and shounen manga, they’re having it with their fists.  Still one of the best superhero school comics out there.

The Promised Neverland:  New this year, and the most promising of the newcomers.  Emma and the other children in the orphanage never questioned the rules about not leaving the grounds, or wondered what happened to the kids who were adopted.  Until the day they learned the horrible truth–the children who leave are eaten by demons!  Now Emma and the two smartest boys in the orphanage, Norman and Ray, must figure out a way to escape, even though Mother Isabella and Sister Krone are keeping a sharp eye out for potential trouble.

We’re still in the early stages of the plot, and much remains mysterious–just what is Isabella’s real motive here?  Do the demons control all of Earth, or just the area around the orphanage?  Just where is the orphanage anyway?  With all the plotting and counter-plotting, this is so far a worthy successor to Death Note.

Black Clover:  In the world where everyone has at least some magical ability except Asta (who now has anti-magic), the Black Bulls are the dregs of the Magic Knights of the Clover Kingdom.  But just because they’re a ragtag bunch of misfits doesn’t mean they’re pushovers!  Currently, two groups that are enemies of the Clover Kingdom have teamed up to attack the Witches’ Forest–good thing the Black Bulls just happened to be there to get medical attention for Asta’s arms!

Food Wars!:  Soma’s education at the elite culinary school Totsuki Institute is threatened when an embittered former student, Azami Nakiri, takes over the school and insists that everyone must now cook only the recipes he likes in the way he prescribes.  Soma and his fellow rebels have been whittled away by rigged final exams, but now Azami’s old classmate (and Soma’s father) Joichiro has shown up to propose a team shokugeki (cooking contest) for all the marbles!  Can the Polar Star team win, even with Azami’s genius chef daughter Erina on their side?

RWBY:  Based on the popular webtoon, this manga covers events that happened before the four girls who make up the RWBY team joined together at their school for monster hunting training.  The current plotline involves Blake (the “B”), who is a member of the Faunus, a humanoid species that is discriminated against by the majority humans.  She was once a train robber to help her people, but her partner Adam crossed the line….  I have not been very impressed with this tie-in.

The most recent issues have two “Jump Start” series that have just started in Japan and may be added to the regular rotation.

Demon’s Plan involves two boys who grew up in a slum together, working hard and saving money for a chance to get a wish from an artifact known as “the Demon’s Plan.”  It turns out that artifact was a fake, but in  the process the owner of the real thing shows up and turns them both into “demons” who must now battle other demons and eventually each other.  The one  who’s less enthused about that idea has made it to the big city in search of the cruel creator of demons.  Could be good, not hitting me well just yet.

Ole Golazo is about a lad named Banba who was a tae kwon do champion before being banned from the sport for fighting.  (In fairness, he was provoked beyond endurance, but rules is rules.)  Adrift in high school, he develops a crush on a girl, and tries to join the soccer team she manages.  Banba has amazing kicking skills, but knows nothing of the rules and customs of “the Beautiful Game.”  Can he be trained to work with a team to achieve victory?  Very reminiscent of the early chapters of Slam Dunk and has some likability.

And then there’s monthly features as well, so let’s look at those–

Seraph of the End:  On the post-apocalyptic world, our heroes have gone AWOL from the Demon Army (which is humans who use demon weapons that if abused will turn them into demons) and teamed up with the nicest vampire they’ve met so far.  They’re in a tenuous alliance with some vampires that seem to be rebelling against their top-heavy social order, but who are not to be trusted.  In the most recent chapter, annoying vampire Crowley reveals he is far more powerful than he’s been letting on.  But he’s still well below the person the alliance will need to beat for the next step of the plan.

Blue Exorcist:  The focus is off Rin “Son of Satan” Okamura for the moment, as his classmate in exorcism training Ryuji works with unorthodox investigator Lightning to discover what happened to several missing people on the Blue Night.  It seems there’s a secret laboratory located on a different time axis below the cram school.

Boruto:  A sequel to the long-running Naruto series starring the son of Naruto.  His father’s turned into a boring bureaucrat who’s hardly ever home, and Boruto tries to get his attention by winning big in a multi-village tournament/exam.  Except that Boruto is talked into using some devices that are against the rules, and is shamed by his father for it.  Now, Naruto has been captured by new villains, and Boruto must regain his honor by joining the rescue team.

Yu-Gi-Oh! Arc-V:  I have actually completely lost track of what the plotline is supposed to be, though it seems that both the multiple personality protagonist and his arch-enemy have traveled back in time from when children’s card games destroyed the Earth.  I’m not even sure a full twenty-four hours have passed since the beginning of the series, and certainly the card game school mentioned early on has gotten zero development since.  This is a hot mess.

One-Punch Man:  Saitama, the superhero who can defeat any opponent with a single punch (and that really sucks for him) is participating in a martial arts tournament in a wig disguise.  Meanwhile, most of the other heroes are dealing with a huge monster infestation.  Slow going, but still very amusing.

Although the loss of several popular series seems to have caused a drop in sales for the print edition, the online version is still excellent value for money and is highly recommended for fans of shounen manga.

Manga Review: Nichijou: My Ordinary Life (1)

Manga Review: Nichijou: My Ordinary Life (1) by Keiichi Arawa

The ordinary lives that all of us lead every day might perhaps be a succession of miracles.

This is the story of four ordinary high school girls living their ordinary everyday lives.  Yukko, cheerful but not very bright; Mio, who’s of average intellect and has an artistic streak; the quiet and book-smart Mai; and Nano, who’s a robot with a wind-up key in her back.  They all have their little quirks, and strange things happen often, but it’s all a part of ordinary life.

Nichijou: My Ordinary Life (1)

Nichijou (“Everyday”) is a shounen (boy’s) comedy manga that ran from 2006-2015, with an anime adaptation in 2011.  There isn’t much of a narrative arc; most of the stories depict short scenes from the lives of one or more characters’ daily lives…strange as those events may be.  There are some recurring themes, the most frequent of which is Nano’s desire to blend in with humans, and her frustration with her inventor/ward, eight year old mad scientist Professor Shinonome, who refuses to remove the key in  her back.

In this first volume, we are introduced to the main characters as they head to school in the morning (Nano doesn’t quite make it.)  Yukko tries to figure out why Mai is ignoring her.  Nano has difficulties with new functions the Professor installed in her body.  The pretentious Sasahara (drama club president) and hot-tempered Misato (kendo club member) try to decide what to do for the cultural festival.

There’s a school assembly led by Principal Shinonome (who may or may not be related), known for his “dad jokes” and the intensely shy Ms. Sakurai.   Yukko witnesses a wrestling match between the principal and a deer–and can never tell anyone.  Yukko and Mai play rock-paper-scissors.  Yukko and Mio build a card house (this is a silent chapter.)  Yukko fails to study for finals, and the questions seem indecipherable.

Yukko tries to finish her lunch despite dropping a key ingredient.  Nano and the Professor have cake.  Ms. Sakurai tries to enforce school rules on Sasahara.   Mio belatedly remembers she drew an embarrassing picture in her notebook when Yukko tries to borrow it.  Mio gets a part-time job that sucks.  Yukko finally did her homework on time, but didn’t remember to bring it back to school.  Nano suffers from over the top comedic reactions due to the Professor’s latest modifications.

The short pieces are usually funny, though some of them rely on Japanese conventions of comedy that might be opaque to newer readers of manga.  The lack of focus and chapters where nothing much happens might also make this less appealing to some readers.  Also, there’s some slapstick violence.

I especially like the card house chapter, which utilizes suspense and the previously established characterization to build to a silly conclusion.

The art in this first volume is less than stellar, and suffers greatly from “same face”–the artist improved greatly over the course of the series.

A word or two more about the anime:  It does not present the sketches in the same order, allowing it to have a plot arc where Nano has to convince the Professor to let her attend school.  It also has interspersed gags from the creator’s other series Helvetica Standard, and in the second half of the season, the closing credits feature a different song each time.

I recommend this series for fans of sketch comedy and magical realism.

And now, a music video based on scenes from the anime:

Manga Review: Orange the Complete Collection 1

Manga Review: Orange the Complete Collection 1 by Ichigo Takano

If you could send a letter to yourself ten years in the past, what would you say?  “Life will get better after high school”?  “Don’t drink and drive”?  “Here are the winning lottery numbers for [date]”?  On the first day of her junior year of high school, Naho Takamiya receives a letter that purports to be from herself ten years from “now.”  It correctly predicts a series of events, including that a new boy from Tokyo, Kakeru, will be joining her group of friends.  Then it gets to the reason the letter was sent.

One of Naho’s friends won’t survive the year.

Orange the Complete Collection 1

This is a shoujo (girls’) romance manga with a touch of melancholy.  Naho is a motherly girl who cares deeply about her friends, but she’s also quite timid and a bit of a doormat.  Even though she knows her future self is giving good advice, Naho hesitates to stand up for herself or tell people how she really feels, and several opportunities to influence events slip through her fingers.

There is also a bit of a love triangle involved.  Kakeru Naruse clearly has feelings for Naho that deepen over time, but he’s hurting inside and distances himself from others–he is considering suicide.  Hiroto Suwa also has feelings for Naho, but considers his friendship with Kakeru important enough to set those aside to help the couple get together.

The other characters are less developed in this first volume (which contains volumes 1-3 of the Japanese version.)  Azusa Murasaka is a bit loud and flashy; Takako Chino is more elegant but has a short temper; and Saku Hagita looks gloomy and serious, but has a gift for saying funny things.

The story is set in Matsumoto, a small city in the mountainous area of Nagano Prefecture.  Every so often there’s some nice art of the local scenery, but most panels skip backgrounds.  Otherwise, the art is decent and conveys the action and emotions well.  The location also plays into the motivation of “mean girl” Ueda, who tries to start a romance with Kakeru based on the fact that they’re both from big city Tokyo, not like the provincial locals.

After a while, we do get glimpses of future Naho and her surviving friends, as the events that lead to the letter being sent back slowly unfold.  There’s some discussion of how time travel might work–will changing the past overwrite the previous events entirely, or does it simply create a new timeline starting from the deviation point?  Naho’s letter becomes less useful as she does start making decisions that vary from the original; by the end of this volume, Naho has decided not to rely on it anymore.  This decision is helped along by plot twists at the end of Japanese volumes 2 & 3, which genre-savvy readers will see coming.

The story does deal with suicide and its effects on the survivors, the regret and guilt it causes.  It’s made clear that there’s no magic bullet for suicide prevention.  The support and attention of friends does help, but they can’t always be there, and it is clear that they might still fail.  (And of course, Naho can’t just tell responsible adults what she knows without revealing her source.)

An anime adaptation is running as of this writing, and you can probably find it on a streaming service.

Recommended for teens who enjoy a touch of science fiction in with their melancholy romance, and are able to handle the theme of suicide.

 

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