Manga Review: Skip-Beat! Volumes 4-5-6

Manga Review: Skip-Beat! Volumes 4-5-6 by Yoshiki Nakamura

Quick recap:  Kyoko Mogami dropped out of school and moved to Tokyo to support her beloved Sho as he tried to break into show business.  A couple of years later, the now rising star let slip that he has never liked Kyoko back, just using her as a free servant.   Enraged, Kyoko has vowed to get revenge by defeating Sho at the one thing he truly cares about, public popularity.

Skip-Beat! Volumes 4-5-6

Despite no training in the field or immediately obvious talent, Kyoko managed to get a internship at the LME talent agency, because she amused eccentric president Lory.   Kyoko and another young woman with difficulties due to attitude, Moko, have been assigned to the “Love Me” section where they do humiliating chores in an effort to get noticed.

At the beginning of this combined volume, Kyoko manages to pass an audition to acting school by flipping a schmaltzy script to let her acid tongue shine.  She doesn’t get the full scholarship, though, because Lory’s granddaughter Maria (whose home situation mirrored the script) interfered.  Maria and Kyoko bond, and Lory begins to get an idea of how bad Kyoko’s mother was.

Next up, a series of coincidences wind up placing Kyoko in a chicken suit on a TV variety show just as that show has Sho as the main guest.  When Kyoko hears Sho telling fibs to make himself sound more cool, she decides to use her anonymity to get revenge by making the heartbreaker look bad.  It doesn’t quite work out the way she planned, but does allow her to see a different side of her coworker Ren.

We also learn that Ren has deeper connections to Kyoko than she’s aware of, but keeping them a secret because of his work ethic.

The following story has Kyoko and Moko  trying out for a soft drink commercial, and we’re introduced to Moko’s self-appointed arch-nemesis Erika Koenji.  A spoiled rich girl, Erika has never forgiven Moko (real name Kanae, by the way) for getting the lead in a third-grade play over her, and has used her wealth and connections ever since to quash Moko’s acting aspirations.   This is at least partially responsible for Moko’s attitude problem and unwillingness to be friends with other girls.

Learning bits of this makes Kyoko, who has never had a female friend either, feel a connection to Moko, and their unique acting styles (plus some dumb luck) gets them the commercial spot.

The next big storyline has a cold going around the office, knocking out Ren’s manager, and since all the regular replacements are also sick, this leaves Kyoko with the job (while she’s also studying for a high school entrance exam–she really wants to complete her education.)  Kyoko isn’t very good at a talent manager’s main job duties, but her skillset comes in handy when Ren falls ill as well and needs a nurse.  Ship tease!

While Kyoko’s negative personality traits are still present, this collected volume allows her to show the positive ones as well.  The appearances of her (literal) “inner demons” are less frequent.   We also get some nice development for a few of the supporting characters, and hints of deeper backstory.  I like the balance of comedy and dramatic elements, and the romantic hints aren’t overwhelming the story.

The character art is good, but backgrounds are often sketchy or outright absent.

Kyoko’s absentee mother comes across as a real piece of work; parents of younger readers may want to discuss unreasonable expectations with their children.  Aside from that, this book is suitable for junior high kids (especially girls) on up.

Recommended to shoujo readers who like a little tartness in their heroines.

Book Review: People Tools for Business

Book Review: People Tools for Business by Alan C. Fox

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.  My copy is an uncorrected galley, and there may be changes in the final product.

People Tools for Business

Alan C. Fox is a successful real estate manager and entrepreneur (and poetry magazine publisher) and previously wrote a book titled People Tools.  That book was a success, so he has written this sequel that focuses on business-related strategies.  It’s divided into fifty short chapters, each with an story or two illustrating the point.

Like many self-help books, some of the advice is obvious, or at least should be, like “show up on time”and “keep a sense of humor.”  Others are a bit more complex, such as the “glass staircase” to overcome the “glass ceiling.”    A few of the chapter titles are directly taken from the author’s personal experience; see if you can guess what situation “Order a Pineapple Fluff” is useful in.

Most of the stories draw from the author’s personal experience, but “Don’t Run Out of Cash” may be more viable for people whose fathers can loan them $6000 to start a business (more in today’s money) than those who have to contemplate selling blood to eat today.  Yes, Mr. Fox did have to let go of some of his three private jets during the last recession, but it’s not quite the same.

That caveat in place, most of the advice in this book is solid, and the short, entertaining chapters make this an excellent book for busy folks such as executives and entrepreneurs.  Consider it as a gift for the business-oriented person in your life.  It goes on sale 9/30/14 as a trade paperback, no word on an audio edition, but I think it would work well that way as well.

Book Review: Ditch the Pitch

Book Review: Ditch the Pitch by Steve Yastrow

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

Ditch the Pitch

This book is subtitled “The Art of Improvised Persuasion”; it’s primarily aimed at salespeople, although the author mentions that the techniques can be used for any persuasive conversation.  Most of the focus is on using improvisation techniques to create an interactive connection with the other person, rather than a prepared sales pitch.

The author is a marketing consultant whose previous books include We: The Ideal Customer Relationship and Brand Harmony.    Much of his research for this volume was done by attending improvisational performances and workshops, and interviewing improvisational performers.

Some of the tips presented in this book include active listening, making the conversation about the customer’s story and then making it “our” story by matching the customer’s story with the useful bits of yours, and using “yes, and…” instead of “no” or “yes, but.”  It’s a bit much to take all at once, so the author has broken it down into useful habits to work on one or two at a time.  This has website support for the dedicated practitioner.

This book’s message primarily applies to “real-time” conversations; while improvisational speaking is affected by talent, almost everyone can learn the skills with practice and patience.  Despite the reassurances of the author, salesmanship is the main use of the topic in this book.  It is less likely to be useful for those in low-level positions where you are expected to complete X number of calls in an hour, or are punished for going “off-script.”

I would recommend the book itself primarily to those interested in sales or customer service (which also requires improvisational skills.)   I recommend some training in improvisation to everyone who can find time for it; it is very helpful in many areas of life.

 

 

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