Open Thread: Top Posts of 2016!

Open Thread: Top Posts of 2016!

I’m sure you all know how top ten lists work, so let’s get straight into it!

The Financial Expert

Top Ten Posts of 2016
1. Book Review: The Financial Expert
2. Anime Review: Urusei Yatsura
3. Open Thread: Minicon 51 Report
4. Comic Book Review: Batman Deathblow After the Fire
5. Book Review: The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds
6. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
7. Manga Review: Ooku 10 & 11
8. Comic Strip Review: Kill 6 Billion Demons 1
9. Book Review: Outlaws of the Atlantic: Sailors, Pirates and Motley Crews in the Age of Sail
10. Book Review: The Guns of Navarone

The Financial Expert by R.K. Narayan was the dark horse victory of the year. It was a book randomly selected off the shelf at a used bookstore for my #ReadPOC2016 challenge. And somehow, my review of it is within the top ten of Google results for this book!

Now let’s compare to the list of all-time favorite posts as selected by you, the readers.

Urusei Yatsura

Top Ten All-Time Posts
1. Anime Review: Urusei Yatsura
2. Manga Review: Weekly Shonen Jump (USA)
3. Book Review: Wrapped in the Flag: A Personal History of America’s Radical Right
4. Comic Book Review: The Forgotten Man Graphic Edition
5. Manga Review: Vagabond Volume 1
6. Anime for Speculative Fiction Fans
7. Anime Review: Magi – Labyrinth of Magic
8. Book Review: The Financial Expert
9. Anime Review: Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
10. Book Review: Narrative Structure in Comics: Making Sense of Fragments

As you can see, “Those Annoying Aliens” is a series with legs.

Time to break it down into categories, starting with the media type this blog is mostly about.

The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds

Top Ten Books 2016
1. The Financial Expert
2. The Woman Who Breathed Two Worlds
3. Outlaws of the Atlantic: Sailor, Pirates and Motley Crews in the Age of Sail
4. The Guns of Navarone
5. White Fang
6. They Talked to a Stranger
7. The Black Tulip
8. The Inugami Clan
9. The Casebook of Carnacki the Ghost Finder
10. Thanks for the Feedback (tie)
10. Jewish Noir (tie)

Four of these eleven were #ReadPOC2016 selections, but more notable is the dominance of older works.

Active Raid

Top Ten Anime 2016
1. Urusei Yatsura
2. Active Raid
3. The Kindaichi Case Files Return
4. Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood/Battle Tendency
5. The Rose of Versailles
6. Tonari no Seki-Kun
7. Matchless Raijin-Oh
8. Mushibugyo
9. Invaders of the Rokujyoma!?
10. Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches

Active Raid, Kindaichi and Jojo’s have all had new seasons since my reviews.

Cover of Batman/Deathstroke

Top Ten Comicbooks 2016
1. Batman/Deathblow After the Fire
2. Showcase Presents: Weird War Tales Volume 1
3. Vertigo CYMK
4. Teen Titans Earth One Volume 1
5. Showcase Presents: The Great Disaster Featuring the Atomic Knights
6. Child of the Sun
7. Showcase Presents: The Trial of the Flash
8. Essential Sub-Mariner, Vol. 1
9. Essential Rampaging Hulk, Vol. 1
10. Showcase Presents: Super Friends

Apparently there was a huge jump of interest in Brian Azzarello’s early DC work this year.

Ooku 11

Top Ten Manga 2016
1. Ooku 10 & 11
2. Vinland Saga Book Seven
3. Dream Fossil
4. Ayako
5. Die Wergelder 1
6. Princess Jellyfish Volume 1
7. Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches #1
8. A*Tomcat
9. Let’s Dance a Waltz (tie)
9. Assassination Classroom (tie)

More mature titles were strong this year, with the first young adult title coming in at #7.

And now, let’s look at where you, the all-important readers are coming from!

The Naturalist Theodore Roosevelt

Top Ten Viewing Countries 2016
1. United States
2. United Kingdom
3. Canada
4. Russia
5. France
6. Germany
7. Brazil
8. India
9. Australia
10. Japan

There was one lonely visitor from Bahrain–tell your friends!

The number one search term this year was “Images of Bela Lugosi in ‘The Island of Dr. Moreau.'”

And now it’s your turn! Have any thoughts on the winning media? What else have you enjoyed this year?

Happy New Year!

Manga Review: Showa 1926 1939 a History of Japan

Manga Review: Showa 1926 1939 a History of Japan by Shigeru Mizuki

This is the first volume of Shigeru Mizuki’s  massive history of Japan during the reign of Emperor Hirohito, the “Showa Era,”  It was a long reign, covering most of the Twentieth Century, from 1926-1989.  In addition to the larger story of Japan, it is also his autobiography, as Mizuki’s earliest childhood memories coincide with the beginning of that era.

Showa 1926 1939 a History of Japan

This volume opens several years earlier, with the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 which devastated Tokyo.  The repercussions of this, combined with fiscal mismanagement, created a financial crisis that crippled Japan’s economy.  The optimism and liberalization of the Taisho period took a huge hit.  Japan struggled along until 1929 and the worldwide effects of the Great Depression hit.

A combination of the Red Scare (the belief that Communists were about to take over), military successes and government incompetence led to the rise of right-wing organizations, especially military cliques.  Japan became ever more aggressive against its neighbors in Asia, setting up the puppet state of Manchukuo and grabbing ever more territory from China.

Japan became a rogue state, leaving the League of Nations when that body attempted to intervene in its conquests.  Only Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy recognized Manchukuo, and Japan’s alliance with those nations was about to drag it into World War Two.

This is a “warts and all” history, which covers events that many Japanese schoolkids might not be taught in official classes, or have glossed over for them.  There are many painful topics in here, so despite childish hijinks in the parts dealing with Shigeru’s early life, I would recommend it for senior high school students and up.

Warts and all is also how Mizuki depicts himself as a child and young man.  Naturally athletic but lazy, bright but unmotivated, sensitive but engaging in fights both as part of a gang and solo.  It will take the horrors of war (as depicted in the third volume) to force him into a responsible adult life.  Perhaps he got some of it from his father, who is shown as a Micawber-like optimist despite his economic woes.

There’s a lot of names and dates, so the end-notes are very helpful–you still might want to have Wikipedia open to assist with some of the more obscure bits and to cross-reference what else was going on in the world at the time.  Some bits come across as very dry, making the personal stories a relief.

The art may be jarring for those unused to Mizuki’s style; many pages are drawn directly from photographs in a realistic style, while others are done in a very loose, cartoony fashion.  It’s also kind of weird to have Nezumi-Otoko (Rat-man) as the narrator of the more serious history portion-he would not seem the most reliable of narrators.

Overall, not as interesting as the third volume, which features Shigeru’s most harrowing experiences, but well worth seeking out from the library.

Book Review: The Third Chimpanzee for Young People

Book Review: The Third Chimpanzee for Young People by Jared Diamond, adapted by Rebecca Stefoff

Disclosure:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

The Third Chimpanzee for Young People

This is a young adult version of Jared Diamond’s The Third Chimpanzee, originally printed in 1992.  I have not read that book, so will not be making direct comparisons.  I have, however, read Guns, Germs & Steel, which has some overlap with this volume.

Mr. Diamond is a biogeographer and evolutionary biologist.  In this book, he discusses the information (current as of 1992) that scientists have about the evolution of humans, who share about 98% of their DNA with chimpanzees.  This segues into an examination of human behavior, how it is (and is not) unique among the world’s animals; and winds up with some thoughts about what this might mean for humanity’s future.

The language is clear and should be suitable for strong readers from 10-11 up; there’s also a helpful glossary at the back along with an index.  There is no bibliography, presumably because the sources would not be written for young adults.  There are several illustrations and sidebars to break up the text.

Parents of sensitive tweens should be aware that the book covers some “heavy” subjects, such as war and genocide.  There’s also some discussion of the probable evolution of human sexuality.

A couple of chapters recap the information from Guns, Germs & Steel about why some human societies developed technology more quickly than others.  Mr. Diamond frequently uses “narrative causality”; trying to find the most logical sequence of cause and effect without being able to fill in all the links in the chain.

The final chapters deal with the looming specter of environmental destruction and mass extinction of animal species.  (But not anthropogenic climate change.)  Mr. Diamond is pessimistic about the chances of alien contact.  He does believe, however that conservation and population control can mitigate the worst effects of human behavior.   After all, while evolutionary biology explains many things about human behavior, it is not the only explanation.  We have free will.

This would be a good general introduction to anthropology and biogeography for  middle schoolers and non-science majors.  Some of the information is out of date, due to it being more than two  decades since the original book was written–serious students should review the recent research as well.  As Mr. Diamond repeatedly reminds us, his opinions influence his interpretation of the available evidence.

Book Review: The 36 Ancient Chinese Strategies for Modern Business

Book Review: The 36 Ancient Chinese Strategies for Modern Business by Lan Bercu

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

The 36 Ancient Chinese Strategies for Modern Business

Beginning some time in the late 1970s, when it became obvious that Japan had become an economic powerhouse, American businesses began taking an interest in Asian philosophies that might explain why companies from those areas were doing so well, especially in industries where America was faltering.   Thus, books for business explicating on The Five Rings, The Art of War and so forth have been written and often sold well.

This is the latest book in that tradition.  The author was born and raised in Vietnam, where The 36 Strategies, a text on warfare believed to have been compiled during China’s Warring States period, is read by schoolchildren.  She has since found the information included helpful in her career as a speaker on business and international matters.

The main text is divided into thirty-six short chapters, one for each strategy.  Each starts with a short story about ancient Chinese warfare, then one or more examples of how modern businesses have implemented these strategies, whether by name or by chance.  This is followed by translation into more basic tips, and questions for the business to ask itself based on the strategy.

Some of the strategies have poetic sounding titles, like “slough off the cicada’s golden shell” or “borrow a corpse to resurrect a soul”, while others are more plain-spoken, like “kill with a borrowed knife.”   The strategies themselves, however, tend to be simple to understand, if sometimes difficult to apply to a given situation.  That last bit is why they’re arranged by type; some are better when you have a clear advantage, others when you’re on the defensive or in a losing position.

It should be noted that the more literal applications of some of these strategies to business, such as “replace the beam with rotted timbers” and “deck the tree with false blossoms” may be considered unethical, and in some cases are outright illegal.  The author points out that businesses (and customers) should be aware of these strategies anyway, to help defend against them.

The short chapters and copious examples make this a good read for the busy person on the go; this is one time I would suggest buying the e-book version.  The book comes with an ad for the author’s services, bibliography and an index.

The utility of this book will depend on whether you already have another of the books relating the 36 strategies to business.  If so, you may not need this one.  This book also has a lot of synergy with The Art of War, so you may want to invest in one of the business books that concentrate on that text as well.

In war, do not repeat the tactics that have gained you one victory.  Rather, let your methods be determined by the infinite variety of circumstances. — Sun Tzu

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