Manga Review: Futaba-kun Change! Vol. 1

Manga Review: Futaba-kun Change! Vol. 1 by Hiroshi Aro

Futaba Shimeru is a junior high school student whose voice has recently changed, and has started noticing girls, especially his pretty classmate Misaki.  One day, a wrestling club teammate gives Futaba a girlie magazine, and the young fellow retreats to the boys’ room to read it.  The revelation of what girls look like under their clothes is exciting, and Futaba realizes this would apply to Misaki as well, and he becomes so excited he passes out.

Futaba-Kun Change Vol. 1
Actually the Studio Ironcat cover for the sixth story, depicting both Futaba forms at the same time.

When Futaba wakes up, he is startled to discover that he himself is now possessed of female anatomy, and partially undresses to check that yes, it’s for real.  It’s at this point Futaba’s wrestling teammates burst  in looking for him and find a half-naked girl instead.  Some scary moments and the discovery that the transformation is not permanent later, Futaba arrives home and discovers that (unbeknownst to him) his entire family switches sex on a regular basis!

This 1990s shounen manga series was a fairly blatant “follow the leader” of Rumiko Takahashi’s Ranma 1/2, but soon goes off in its own direction.  Most notably, while Ranma’s female form was treated more or less as a flesh disguise for the very male Ranma, Futaba’s two forms are both natural to his/her biology and over the course of time he/she is able to switch mental gears as quickly as the physical changes occur.  There’s also more attention to what those physical changes involve, which leads to some body function humor over the course of the story.

The series ran eight volumes with an abrupt genre change in the last volume; the author had to wrap it up because of falling sales.  It was originally brought to the U.S. by Studio Ironcat but has long been out of print.  This new version is only available on Kindle.  Nipples have been erased, and there are a couple of instances where the junior high school is referred to as “university.”

Most of the characters have over the top personalities for the sake of humor; for example, Misaki is very superstitious, while her friend Negiri is a money-grubber.  This is less pleasant in the case of Futaba’s older sister Futana, who is very lecherous (even hitting on Futaba!) and Mr. Sabuyama, a teacher who lusts after teenage boys.  The humor also relies heavily on selective obliviousness; not only has Futaba somehow failed to notice his entire family changing sex, but the very distinctive school principal runs around in a superhero costume every so often and his own daughter fails to make the connection.

There’s a lot of male-oriented fanservice, with the occasional pretty boy tossed in.  There’s also quite a bit of slapstick violence–especially in the battle tournament in later volumes.  The sexual harassment humor has not aged well.

Recommended (with reservations) for gender-bender comedy fans, and those who like Nineties manga.

Manga Review: Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon 3

Manga Review: Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon 3 by Naoko Takeuchi

Usagi Tsukino doesn’t look much like hero material at first glance.  She’s clumsy, not the sharpest knife in the drawer, and a bit of a crybaby.  But Usagi has a secret heritage, and when talking cat Luna seeks her out, Usagi becomes the bishoujo senshi (“pretty guardian”) Sailor Moon!  Now gifted with magical powers, Sailor Moon must seek out the other guardians and defeat the monsters of the Dark Kingdom to save the world.

Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon 3

This 1991 manga series was groundbreaking in many ways.  The mahou shoujo (“magical girl”) subgenre of fantasy manga and anime had been around since the 1960s, inspired by the American TV show Bewitched, but was primarily about cute witches, fairy princesses and ordinary girls who were gifted power by witches or fairies who used their magic to help people with their day to day problems and maybe once in a while fight a monster or two.  Takeuchi blended this with the traditionally boy-oriented sentai (“warrior squad”) subgenre to create magical girl warriors whose primary thing was using magical powers to defeat evil.

It was also novel for being a shoujo (girls’) manga with an immediate animated adaptation as Takeuchi developed the series in coordination with Toei.  The manga ran monthly while the anime was weekly, so the animated version has lots of “filler” episodes that don’t advance the plot but do expand on the characterization of minor roles.  Indeed, it’s better to think of the manga and anime as two separate continuities.

Both manga and anime were huge hits, though the versions first brought to America were heavily adulterated.  American children’s television wasn’t ready for some of the darker themes of some of the episodes, and the romantic relationship of Sailors Neptune and Uranus blew moral guardians’ minds.  More recently, new, more faithful translations have come out, and there’s a new anime adaptation, Sailor Moon Crystal that sticks closer to the manga continuity.

The volume to hand, #3, contains the end of the Dark Kingdom storyline.  Wow, that was quick.   Once forced into a direct confrontation, Queen Beryl isn’t really much more formidable than her minions; only the fact that she has a brainwashed Prince Endymion (Tuxedo Mask) on her side makes the fight difficult.  Queen Metallia, the true power behind the throne, on the other hand, is a world-ending menace and it will take everything our heroes have plus Usagi awakening to her full heritage to defeat it.

Takeuchi had originally planned for her heroines to die defeating Metallia and ending the series there, but the anime had great ratings, and both Toei and her manga’s editor felt that this would be too much of a downer.  After some floundering, the editor suggested the new character “Chibi-Usa” and her startling secret, and Takeuchi was able to come up with a plotline from there.

So it is that just as Usagi and Mamoru are getting romantic, a little girl who claims her name is also Usagi drops out of the sky to interrupt.  “Chibi-Usa” looks a lot like a younger version of our Usagi, and is on a mission to reclaim the Silver Crystal (despite the fact that she seems to be wearing a Silver Crysal herself.)  She infiltrates Usagi’s family, much to the older girl’s irritation.

At the same time, a new enemy appears, the Black Moon.  Led by Prince Demande and advised by the mysterious Wiseman, they seek not only the Silver Crystal but a being called the “Rabbit.”  Their initial ploy is to send out the Spectre Sisters to capture the Sailor Senshi one by one.  The Spectre Sisters are very much evil counterparts of the Senshi, each having an elemental affinity and interests matching one of the heroes.  The first two, Koan and Berthier, are destroyed in battle, but not before they remove Sailor Mars and Sailor Mercury from the board.

In a subplot, a new minor character is introduced, an underclassman of Mamoru’s whose job is shilling Mamoru and his fine qualities.  This is actually kind of helpful, as Tuxedo Mask had spent most of the Dark Kingdom arc either being mysterious or unavailable.  This allows us more insight into who this Mamoru person is when he’s not around Usagi.

Rei and Ami get some development in their focus chapters, but seemingly mostly so that the Spectre Sisters can have similar interests.

Some of this comes off as cliche now, but that’s because Sailor Moon was such a strong influence on magical girl stories that came afterward.  Here’s where many of the tropes started!

The art is very good of its kind, and again seems less distinctive now because of imitators.

Recommended for magical girl fans, teenage girls and romantic fantasy fans.

Manga Review: Noragami: Stray God #1

Manga Review: Noragami: Stray God #1 by Adachitoka

Mutsumi is in a bad way.   Not only is she under stress studying for the high school entrance exams, but her classmates have turned against her, bullying Mutsumi and encouraging her to self-harm.  She’s locked herself in a toilet stall for a good cry when suddenly she sees a telephone number in the graffiti advertising someone named “Yato” who promises to solve her problems.  Desperate, Mutsumi calls the number.

Noragami: Stray God #1

To her shock, Yato (who appears to be a teenage boy) and his female companion Tomone teleport straight into the girls’ room to discuss Mutsumi’s problem.  It turns out that Yato is a kami (“spirit” or “god”), but he’s at the very bottom of the hierarchy, with no worshipers or space in a shrine, making him a “stray.”  In an effort to increase his visibility and save up cash to buy a place to live, Yato has scribbled his number all over town, and charges five yen (roughly a nickle) for his problem-solving services.  Tomone is Yato’s shinki, a living weapon with a mind of her own.

Unfortunately, Yato isn’t all that bright, and tends to solve problems by cutting them with his sword.  Mutsumi’s problems are partially caused by an ayakashi (hostile spirit) that is amplifying and feeding on the negative emotions caused by exam stress, and cutting that is relatively easy.  But that isn’t the only issue, and how Yato finally solves it disgusts Tomone so much that she quits, leaving Yato weaponless at the end of the first story.

This series ran in Monthly Shounen Magazine in long chapters, so there are only three in this volume.  In the second story, Yato meets Hiyori Iki, a human girl who is a big pro wrestling fan, and due to an act of selfless courage develops the ability/problem of her soul slipping loose from her body.   In soul form, she’s physically powerful, but also very vulnerable, gaining a “tail” that’s actually a link back to her physical body–if it’s cut, she dies!  The third story ends with Yato gaining a new shinki, Yukine, who is decidedly unimpressed with his master.

The name of the series immediately brings to mind the classic 1930s manga Norakuro, about a stray dog that joins a canine-people version of the Imperial Japanese army, learns discipline and valor, and climbs the enlisted ranks.  Little-known in America, it was popular and influential in Japan, with demilitarized versions appearing after World War Two ended.

Noragami is fun adventure-comedy, contrasting Yato’s blunt and sometimes abrasive personality against Hiyori’s naivety and sunniness.  While both of them are eager to help people, Yato is goal-oriented and must be compensated first (even if it is just a nickle) while Hiyori just does it because it’s the right thing to do.  Yukine barely appears in this volume, so a full read on his character is not available here.  The art is decent and conveys the action and mood nicely.

As mentioned, the first story does involve bullying, and there is an element of victim-blaming.  There’s a small amount of incidental fanservice–thankfully, the “camera” does not linger.  And of course there’s a certain amount of fantasy violence.  It should be suitable for junior high readers on up; parents of younger readers should point out why victim-blaming is not useful.

This series was popular enough to get a two-season anime adapation, which I have not seen.   Recommended for fans of shounen fantasy manga.

Manga Review: Let’s Dance a Waltz

Manga Review: Let’s Dance a Waltz by Natsumi Ando

Tango Minami’s mother runs a ballroom dance school, where he helps out as a dance instructor (he’s tall for a junior high student.)  But due to a disastrous mistake in his childhood, Tango has decided never to take another full-time partner, and thus not qualify for ballrooom competitions.  Besides, these days he’s much more into hip-hop dancing, which he can perform solo and skill at which makes him popular at school.  Indeed, he hides his ballroom dancing from his schoolmates to avoid being seen as dorky.

Let's Dance a Waltz

Himé Makimura is a shy, withdrawn girl.  Despite her name meaning “princess”, Himé is plain, clumsy and rather pudgy.  Most of her classmates don’t notice her except to be mean, as when a boy notices her looking at him and delivers an excessively strident speech about how he could never be attracted to her.  It surprises our young woman when Ms. Minami spots that under her chubbiness, Himé has the right muscle and skeletal structure to be good at ballroom dancing.

Himé turns out to like dancing very much, especially with her instructor Tango–and everyone around can see that they’re excellent partners.  Except Tango.  While he notes that he finds her unattractive, that’s not the point for him.  He does not want a partner, especially one that goes to the same school as him and could expose his secret ballroom life.  Himé, meanwhile, is falling in love with Tango.

This is a shoujo (girls’) romance manga aimed at the junior high market, so the emphasis is on innocent emotions.  Tango is less meaning to be cruel, and more selfishly immature, and bad at asking for guidance.   His mother seems overbearing, but might be more supportive of his choices if he explained himself better.  There’s almost no dubious content aside from some fat-shaming by Himé’s classmates.

The creator spent time taking ballroom lessons herself to give some authenticity to the poses and training–she mentions that her instructor originally got into dancing to improve his posture.

Contrasting our main pair are the stars of the Minami school, Yuusei and Sumiré.  They’re excellent dancing partners, and good friends, but not a romantic couple.  Indeed, there are hints that Sumiré has feelings for Tango that she’s never acted on.  She’s a good sport, though, and is a consistent help to Himé on dance matters.  Yuusei is a serious sort and wants to be a rival to Tango on the dance floor–he’s the most set against Tango’s refusal to do competitive ballroom.

Late in the volume, Himé gets a makeover; the intensive exercise of dance practice has turned some of her fat to toned muscle, and extensive dolling up with Sumiré’s help for a competition has made our heroine look unrecognizably pretty.   (Presumably, she will still be dowdy at school.)  Tango may change his mind yet!  I know some of my readers are not keen on makeover sequences, but they are common to this sort of plotline.

There are translation notes in the back; perhaps the most important is that while “Tango” isn’t a common boy’s name in Japan, it’s a plausible one that wouldn’t be as much of a giveaway as it is in English.

This is a sweet story that should do well with its target audience; boys who are brave enough to get past all the pink on the cover would also enjoy it.

 

Manga Review: Assassination Classroom

Manga Review: Assassination Classroom by Yusei Matsui

Things are tough for the students of Class 3-E at Kunugigaoka Junior High School.  3-E’s where the elite school sticks all the losers and freaks, the bottom 5% of the student body.  Their classes are held in a decrepit outbuilding, they aren’t allowed any extracurricular activities, and the testing regimen is rigged to keep them from getting out.  Oh, and their teacher is an unstoppable tentacled monster who plans to destroy the Earth after the graduation ceremony.

Assassination Classroom

Except that he’s not quite so unstoppable after all; the students are issued BB guns and rubber knives made of the one substance that is his Kryptonite.  And the government will pay ten billion yen to the student or students who kills Koro-sensei.   Naturally, it’s not going to be easy.  Koro-sensei destroyed 70% of the Moon’s mass just to say “hi” in the first place, flies at Mach 20 and is constantly pulling new powers out of whatever it is that’s under his robe.  So every day the students try to come up with new plans to assassinate their teacher–who is also the best teacher they’ve ever had!

Despite his avowed intention to destroy the Earth, and his antagonistic relationship with his students, Koro-sensei really cares about being a good teacher, and gives the class valuable lessons about life between and even during murder attempts.

This comedy-action manga runs in Shounen Jump in Japan, but due to concerns about school shootings was initially not considered for the American edition.  Only its hit status in Japan has convinced Viz to take a chance on it, and even now it’s rated for older teens rather than the junior high students it was originally aimed at.  Let’s face it, it has the kind of premise that younger teens really love, but gives their parents the vapors.

The students tend to be pretty non-descript until their focus chapters, at which point they develop personalities.  In this first volume, we’re introduced to calm and analytical Nagisa (who’s way too calm about killing someone for a junior high student); Sugino, a baseball enthusiast who let his grades slip after being cut from the school team; Okuda. who’s a whiz at math and science (especially chemistry) but whose lack of facility with words betrays her; and Karma, who’s actually brilliant and an excellent fighter, but attacked the wrong bully.

It should be noted that while most of these kids are in the bottom 5% of the school, it’s a very competitive one, so they’re not stupid.  Most of them.

There’s some decent art, and some clever plot twists.  Experienced manga fans will note a resemblance to Great Teacher Onizuka, another series about an unorthodox educator that turns out to be just what his students need.  Except this series has less creepy fetishization of high school girls and more assassinations.

By all means, check this one out, but don’t bring it to school.

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