Book Review: Classic American Short Stories

Book Review: Classic American Short Stories compiled by Michael Kelahan

This book is more or less exactly what it says in the title, a compilation of short(ish) stories written by American authors, most of which are acknowledged as classics by American Lit professors.  The stories are arranged by author in roughly chronological order from the early Nineteenth Century to the 1920s to stay safely in the public domain.

Classic American Short Stories

The fifty-one stories included begin with Washington Irving’s “Rip Van Winkle”, a tall tale about a henpecked husband who drinks ghostly beer and sleeps for twenty years, right through the American Revolution.  The book ends with “Winter Dreams” by F. Scott Fitzgerald.  A young man from Minnesota finds great success in the laundry business, but heartache when the woman he loves cannot settle for just him.  In between are ones that are very familiar to me, like “The Telltale Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe (a murderer confesses his crime in an effort to prove his sanity) and stories that were new to me, like “The Revolt of ‘Mother'” by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman (a New England woman, tired of an unkept promise, takes matters into her own hands.)

There’s a wide variety of genres represented, from “realistic” slice of life stories through mystery and fantasy to outright horror.  The chronological order highlights the changing social attitudes depicted in the stories, particularly the two Edith Wharton stories about divorce.  Women are reasonably well-represented, and there are a couple of writers of color as well.

Of course, just because a story is “classic” does not mean it will appeal to everyone.  I found Henry James’ novella “The Aspern Papers” (literary buff infiltrates the household of a famous poet’s ex-lover in an effort to gain any memorabilia she might have of him) tedious and predictable.  I am not alone in this, but many other readers have found it fascinating.

Content issues:  Many of these stories have elements of period racism, sexism and classism; sometimes it’s dealt with within the story itself, but other times it pops up as a nasty surprise.  “Paul’s Case” by Willa Cather, about a boy who wants the finer things in life without the tedium of putting in decades of hard labor to get them, deals with suicide.

This is a Barnes & Noble collector’s edition, and is quite handsome and sturdy, with a leather binding, gilt-edged pages and a silk bookmark for a reasonable price.  However, the fact that it has a “compiler” rather than an editor is telling.  There are scattered typos; I do not know if they were caused by errors in transcription, or if the sources were not scrutinized carefully enough.  The author bios at the end are not quite in alphabetical order, and miss out Washington Irving altogether.

Overall, most of these stories are worth reading at least once, and many are worth rereading over the years.  Highly recommended to people who don’t already have their favorites from this collection in a physical book, or are curious about the stories they haven’t read yet.  It’d also make a nice gift for your bookworm friend or relative.

Anime Review: Space Patrol Luluco

Anime Review: Space Patrol Luluco

Luluco is a normal middle-school student who is trying to live a normal middle-school life in the decidedly abnormal town of Ogikubo.  It’s the one place on Earth where aliens are allowed to mix freely with humans.  Luluco’s father Keiji is a Space Patrol officer who helps dispense justice in the city, but when he’s incapacitated, Luluco is forced to step up and join the Space Patrol herself.  So much for a normal life!

Space Patrol Luluco

Luluco is a 13-episode animated series from Studio Trigger, each episode being under eight minutes long.  Despite the short length and limited animation style, the story is full of twists.  Luluco is soon joined in her adventures by handsome transfer student Alpha Omega Nova and bad girl Midori Save-the-World.  The threats just keep getting bigger and bigger, until a big twist that reveals what the villains were after all along.

The fast pace and over the top drama make this show very funny, even if it’s kind of shallow and the logic doesn’t bear thinking about.  It helps to have seen Studio Trigger’s other work, as they cross over with multiple other series, including Kill la Kill (which is reviewed elsewhere on this site.)  There’s a couple of touching moments, and an examination of first love from both the down and up perspectives.

There’s cartoony violence (including gunfights between Luluco’s parents) and a bit of rude humor.  Parents of actual middle-schoolers might want to screen the show before letting their kids watch it, but teens on up should be okay.

A good palate cleanser between more serious anime shows.

Manga Review: Vinland Saga, Book Five

Manga Review: Vinland Saga, Book Five by Makoto Yukimura

Warning: This review contains spoilers for the first four volumes of this series, so you may want to read the reviews for those if you are new to Vinland Saga.

It has been a few years since the end of Thorfinn’s quest for vengeance on the man who killed his father.  In the aftermath, he has become a thrall (slave) to Ketil, a Danish jarl (wealthy landowner.)  He is joined by a young man named Einar, a Norse-Briton who is not happy about having been enslaved.

Vinland Saga, Book Five

Ketil is, as slaveowners go, a fairly decent fellow.  If Thorfinn and Einar can clear enough farmland and grow crops on it in addition to their other tasks, they may eventually be able to buy their freedom and become small landowners in their own right.  There’s a former slave that’s done just that who is employed by Ketil.  It also helps that our young men take the fancy of Sverkel, Ketil’s elderly father, who gives them a hand in return for them doing extra work in his garden.

But don’t let that fool you into thinking that slavery is an okay thing.  Einar and Thorfinn are still property, and if Ketil’s son needs to kill someone to prove his manhood, there’s no law against him destroying his own family’s stock.  And then there’s Arnheid, who is Ketil’s bedservant, and has no chance of ever buying her freedom.

There’s trouble stirring in Ketil’s household, with one son useless at farming but too cowardly to be a warrior, and the other a ruthless raider who begins to think that his war hero father is going soft in the heart.  The mercenary guards may have their own agenda, and the karls (free farmers) have a hate on for the idea that slaves could rise above that station.

Back in England, King Canute is consolidating his rule,  He does it with as little battle as possible, much to the disgust of Thorkell the Tall, now one of his generals.

Believe it or not, it is only in this fifth volume that we are starting the main plot of the series.  While many events swirl about him, the main arc here is Thorfinn finally shaking out of the apathy that he’s been in since the death of Askeladd.  “Being empty means that anything can fit inside you.”  But what is to be his future course, without vengeance to guide Thorfinn’s steps?

This volume continues to be fascinating, even as the main focus switches from battle to farming.  There’s still plenty of violence, though.  And some nudity in a sexual context, but no on-panel sex.   (Ketil’s relationship with Arnheid isn’t exactly consensual on her part, although he has real affection for her.)  Einar’s approach to religion (pray to any and all gods in the hope that one will deliver) might offend some readers.

There are hints of tragedy on the horizon, but we may have to wait a while to see what they are as I am told production on these hefty volumes has been delayed.  Still an excellent buy if you are interested in this sort of thing.

Book Review: Hell-Bent

Book Review: Hell-Bent by Jason Ryan

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.  My copy was an advanced reading copy, and changes will be made in the published version, due out November 2014.  In particular, the end notes and index were not yet finished.

Hell-Bent

Hawaii’s reputation as a tropical paradise vacation destination tends to gloss over the fact that it’s inhabited by fallible human beings, who have the same problems there as anywhere else.  In particular, during the 1970s, it had a skyrocketing crime rate, with far too many unsolved murders.  But this wasn’t the exotic crime you’d see on Hawaii Five-O, but mundane crime like drugs, prostitution and gambling.  And not clever locked room mysteries but thuggish mob hits.

This book centers its narrative on the murder of Charles “Chuckers” F. Marsland III, a nightclub bouncer, and its effect on his father Charles F. Marsland, Jr.  Mr. Marsland, an attorney, was galvanized into desiring the eradication of organized crime from Hawaii, and eventually became the Chief Prosecutor of Honolulu.

The history of Hawaii is briefly sketched from the first time it was contacted by outsiders, through the loss of its sovereignty, and becoming a state.  Thereafter, it concentrates on the matter of organized crime, why it became such a big issue, and who the major players were alleged to be.

While many of them were convicted of crimes, one of the people mentioned most in the book has never even been indicted, much to the frustration of Marsland and others who believed him to be the “godfather” of Hawaiian crime.  The fact that he’s never been proved a criminal is repeatedly brought up, often after a direct quote from someone accusing him of crimes.

Mr. Marsland was apparently, like many driven people, a difficult person, often accusing people who did not completely follow his program of being soft on crime, or actively corrupt.  While he made great strides at bringing down the crime rate, he eventually lost re-election to a more reasonable-sounding prosecutor.

Hawaiian politics play some role in the book, as does the entertainment world.  Many of the criminals had gone to school with people who’d made good, so odd-seeming friendships were not uncommon.

There will be a photo section, bibliography, end notes and an index when the book is fully published.  There’s also an essay by the author on his sources, who he could and could not get information from.

The writing is okay but not gripping.  I’d recommend this book to true crime readers, and people with an interest in Hawaii beyond the tourist destinations.

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