Book Review: 14 Steps to Self-Publishing a Book

Book Review: 14 Steps to Self-Publishing a Book by Mike Kowis, Esq.

Disclaimer:  I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review.  No other compensation was offered or requested.

14 Steps to Self-Publishing a Book

Back in the day, self-publishing was the province of cranks and egomaniacs who couldn’t find a legitimate publisher.  “Vanity presses” preyed upon people who thought there was a large untapped market for dreadful poetry and paranoid ravings.  Sometimes a good book would manage to surface from the self-published world, but it was rare.  Times have changed.  New book distribution models, fancy software and the existence of e-books mean that self-publishing can be quite viable for the author who’s willing to put in  the effort.

It’s not easy.  There are still vanity presses that will charge big bucks for a worthless product, and the sheer variety of available options can confuse and frustrate the budding writer.  Thus this book, which provides a helpful template of things to do that will improve chances of success.  Mr. Kowis is the author of Engaging College Students: A Fun and Edgy Guide for Professors, and uses his experience with that project to inform his advice.

The first step, as it turns out, is not “write a book.”  Mr. Kowis presumes that you have advanced to the first draft manuscript stage, as his first step is “finalizing” that manuscript.  The final step is marketing the finished book, with many stops in between.

At several points the author suggests paying a bit more to hire a professional (for editing and cover design, for example) rather than attempting to do everything yourself.  (I note that I did not find any typos in this book, and while the cover is not spectacular, it works very well for the slim volume this is.)  The steps seem complete enough, and the author gives suggestions on where to search next if you need more information.

The second part of the book discusses costs involved in self-publishing, and the differences between Mr. Kowis’ first  book (kind of fancy) and this one (bare bones and reusing some resources paid for during the first book’s publishing.)

The third part is ten lessons the author learned from writing his first book–I’m not going to give many spoilers, beyond acknowledging that yes, it is difficult to get reviews even when there are free copies available.  Even folks like me who do reviews on the regular can feel like it’s pulling teeth, so don’t feel too bad if your friends don’t come through.

There’s an appendix which turns the 14 steps into a checklist, but I recommend treating the order as a guideline more than a rule as some things need to get done simultaneously.

There are lots of guides to self-publishing on the internet, but it’s nice to have it all in one place on your shelf.  Consider buying this one for your writer friend who’s been considering self-publishing.

Book Review: First Polish Reader (Volume 2)

Book Review: First Polish Reader (Volume 2) by Wiktor Kopernikas

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

This is a book of simple stories in both Polish and English, designed to help students learn to read Polish.  It’s printed by Language Practice Publishing, and uses something called the ALARM (Approved Learning Automatic Remembering Method) which relies on repeating words to build vocabulary.

First Polish Reader

There is no pronunciation guide, as this is not a basic textbook, but it lists the new words from each story, and at the back there are both Polish/English and English/Polish glossaries.  There will be audio tracks of the chapters available on lppbooks.com, but as of this writing only the first volume’s tracks are up.

The stories themselves are simple, and mildly amusing, starting with pet stories and building from there.  For the most part, they avoid slang and phrases that don’t translate literally.  However, there is one major exception.  In the story “Tort”, an eight year old tries to bake a cake.  One of the ingredients is kulinarnym klejem, “culinary glue.”  She mistakenly puts in wood glue instead.  However, the term we would use in English is “shortening” which would not lead to such a mistake.

The book does what it is written to do, but is not an exceptional volume of its kind.  Check with your Polish teacher to see if this is an acceptable supplement to your language learning.

Book Review: Native Silver

Book Review: Native Silver by Blake Hausladen

This is a sequel to Mr. Hausladen’s Ghosts in the Yew and will contain some spoilers for the earlier work.

Native Silver

Prince Barok has brought the sleepy backwater province of Enhedu from a shameful place of exile to a thriving young nation in little over a year with the help of his wife Dia, alsman (head servant) Leger and former bodyguard Geart.    Meanwhile, the Zoviyan Empire is crumbling as its Exaltier, Barok’s father, is weakening and the remaining sons jockey for position.

There’s no time to rest on laurels, as Enhedu’s enemies are already within the country, striking a terrible blow, while Barok’s own plans have much of his support elsewhere.    Even as the Zoviyan Empire suffers from the multiple schemes of its various leaders, an even worse threat is rising from a place long forgotten.

Good news first:  this volume is much improved over the first.   Surprisingly, one of the ways this is done is by introducing more first-person narrators with multiple points of view.   While this technique did not work well in Ghosts in the Yew, here it’s easier to tell the narrators apart.

Also, there is less of the piling up of bad traits to indicate who we should see as a bad person.  Most of the opponents seem more like actual people, even the ones who have had their personalities wiped by magic.

There is less lull time, with the plot moving forward in almost all sections, and short time skips over quiet periods.  On the other hand, this makes some events seem a bit too rushed.  The magic system takes a much more prominent place in the story, which makes the Hessier (who were nigh-invincible in the previous volume) less of a threat, and a new super-Hessier variant is introduced.

There’s not a lot of time spent on recaps, so readers who had not read the previous book may be more confused than not.

There are many illustrations, the most useful of which are several maps making it easier to follow the action.  (The deluxe edition of this book comes with color maps–recommended for collectors!)  The reproductions of hand-written letters are less helpful, especially for readers with weak eyesight.   Once again, this volume could use a glossary, and since many new characters are introduced, a dramatis personae.

The author is unafraid to kill characters off, some dramatically, others abruptly or off-stage.  This includes main characters.

One nice touch; the Zoviyan Empire is misogynistic, while the ancestral Edonians treated women much better, but it’s pointed out that “The Edonians worshiped their women, but they did not listen to them.”  Our protagonists are better at that last bit, and may survive where the Edonians did not.

There are some spellcheck typos, which is a shame in an otherwise professionally produced small press book.

I can recommend this volume much more than the first in the series, and if the author continues to improve at this rate, the next volume should be well worth it.

TV Review: The Court of Last Resort

TV Review: The Court of Last Resort

In 1948, seven lawyers, including Erle Stanley Gardner, the author of the Perry Mason series, formed a group called “The Court of Last Resort.”  They investigated convictions that seemed to have irregularities, to see if the accused had actually committed the crime, much like the modern “Project Innocence.”

the Court of Last Resort

Mr. Gardner apparently thought some of the cases might make good television, and promote the work of the group, so a television series was made and aired 1957-1958.  While the episodes were based on real cases, names were changed to avoid legal problems.  Actors played the Court during episodes, but sometimes the actual lawyers would appear in a postscript.

I watched four episodes.  “The Clarence Redding Case” involved a drifter accused of “assaulting” and murdering a girl in a barn (Rape is implied, but never mentioned.)  “The Jim Thompson Case” has an ex-con mechanic accused of robbing and murdering a man who was shaving at the time.  “The John Smith Case” is another drifter,  accused of murdering a grocer in a robbery gone wrong.  And “The Mary Morales Case” involves a Mexican-American woman accused of murdering a white woman while trying to kill her own husband.

Of the cases, two suspects are proved innocent, one is proved guilty (the irregularity turned out to be a witness covering their own crime) and one did the crime, but it was manslaughter, not murder.

A common theme is suspicion of police misconduct, as the suspects are disadvantaged people that the legal system is weighted against.  It’s not always true.  Certainly the episodes show what we would now consider shocking lack of proper procedure.

The episodes are fairly staid, but the conclusions tend to be very well done emotionally.   The most affecting was the John Smith Case, when the friendless drifter with no family in the world learns that a small kindness he did 22 years ago has cleared him, and he is a free man.

Book Review: The Why of Things

Book Review: The Why of Things: Causality in Science, Medicine, and Life by Peter Rabins

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

The Why of Things

The author of this book is a professor of Geriatric Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University, and it started as a clinical teaching presentation.  Patients often ask “why did this happen to me?”  In attempting to answer that question, and so many more,  the overall concept of causality becomes a subject.

The book makes two presumptions for the sake of discussing the subject, first, that causality exists, and second, that time moves in only one direction.  The latter may be disprovable should the speed of light ever be broken, but at the moment, it’s a reasonable assumption.

The model of causality presented in this book has three facets:  causal models, levels and logics.  In order to correctly use this model, one must decide which part of each facet to apply to the problem at hand.  Empirical logic, for example (aka the scientific method) is often the best choice of method for looking at causality in the physical sciences, while empathic logic (a coherent narrative) might serve better to examine historical causation.

After examining each facet in detail, Mr. Rabins then demonstrates how this model can be used to examine such topics as Alzheimer’s and the problem of violence.

There are extensive references, and an index.  The only illustrations are the facets, repeated through the book with different emphases.

This is graduate-level material, and pretty thick going.  It would be useful to students in scientific, medical or history majors, as well as relevant to classes in logic or statistics.  Fiction writers, especially in the field of science fiction, may also find it useful when writing the thought processes of scientist characters.

 

Book Review: The Rookie’s Guide to Guns & Shooting: Handgun Edition

Book Review: The Rookie’s Guide to Guns & Shooting: Handgun Edition by Tom McHale

Disclaimer:  I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

Handgun Edition

This is one of a series of “Insanely Practical Guides” on firearms and related matters.  This volume primarily focuses on handguns, with brief sections on longer guns.

The parts of the book that are directly about guns, gun-related accessories and shooting are excellent.  A strong emphasis is placed on safety and proper care for your weapons.  From my experience with firearms, all important areas are covered well

Unfortunately, the author has really obvious political beliefs, and thinks he is much funnier than he actually is.  There are many supposed jokes that are cheap jabs at a handful of politicians, bad puns and one or two jokes that were funny the first time but rapidly wear thin.

As a result, the sections on the history of firearms and the Second Amendment are nigh-useless.  The latter is told as a “parable” that reduces the issue to gibberish.  The book would have been much better served  by a sober discussion of Second Amendment issues and why some people have legitimate reasons to consider gun control a good thing.

The author also heavily shills for the National Rifle Association,  dismissing their leadership’s shady tactics with “If you have a disagreement whether your spouse drank the last bit of apple juice, do you leave them forever?”  Mind, your local chapter of the NRA is probably good folks that aren’t fanatically opposed to sane legal restrictions on firearms, but the national leadership is not so likable.

The heavy jabs at current politicians and pop culture references make it likely that this book will become swiftly dated, and opaque to people outside the United States.  It’s unlikely to convince someone who’s on the fence about gun ownership that such would be a good idea.

There are plenty of illustrations, the ones of guns and gun accessories are helpful, the “cartoons” fall flat.  There are also several typos, including apostrophe abuse.

I’d recommend for future editions, if any, that the politics and “humor” be cut back considerably in favor of more solid information, which is what the book does best.

Book Review: Christians at the Border

Book Review: Christians at the Border by M. Daniel Carroll R.

Disclosure:  I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

Christians at the Border

Daniel Carroll is a professor of Old Testament at Denver,  whose mother was Guatemalan, and who has divided his time between the U.S. and Guatemala since he was young.    As such, he has ties to both mainstream American and Latino culture.  In this updated edition (first version published in 2008) he speaks to the issue of immigration from a Biblical perspective.

He covers the history of immigration, primarily Hispanic, into the U.S. starting in 1848, and its ebbs and flows.   There’s a look at the question of  cultural identity and the economic impact of illegal immigration.  Unlike many articles on the subject, he also writes about the effect on the countries the immigrants are from.

Then he really warms to the theme of the Christian dimension of Hispanic immigration, citing its invigorating effects on American religious life, and an understanding of the “sojourner” theme in the Bible.   He refers to several different experiences in the Old Testament of immigration, including the stories of Ruth and Esther.

The book also looks at the Old Testament laws regarding “the stranger and the foreigner in your midst.”   Mr. Carroll claims this is different from similar law codes of the same time period in the Middle East because those others do not have laws to deal with immigration, and because they are influenced by the Hebrew people’s own experience in Egypt.

But the stranger that dwelleth with you shall be unto you as one born among you, and thou shalt love him as thyself; for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God.  Leviticus 19:34

Turning to the New Testament, Mr. Carroll admits Jesus didn’t say anything about the specific topic of immigration, but he did spend time reaching out to the despised and those outside Judean society.  The parable of the Good Samaritan indicates that tribal identification is less important than a person’s behavior to determine who is a “neighbor” to be loved.

!st Peter extends a metaphor of all Christians as sojourners in strange lands.  And last, Mr. Carroll examines Romans 13, which is often used as a “clobber text” against undocumented immigrants.  If they are here illegally, they are breaking the law, and we need give them no further consideration, end of discussion.  But he feels this text should be examined in the context of Romans 12; discerning submission, rather than blind obedience.

The book wraps up with a call to Christians to make their decisions on how to treat immigrants, legal or otherwise, with a view to what the Bible teaches and the example of Jesus.

The text is clear and in understandable language, with a logical progression of thought.  The introduction by Samuel Rodriguez of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference is a bit more jargon-laden.  There’s also an afterword by Ronald J Sider of Evangelicals for Social Action.

For further study, there’s an appendix of resources including websites, both pro- and anti-immigration.  There are extensive endnotes and a small index.

This book will be of most interest to Christians, particularly of the evangelical persuasion, searching for perspective on the issue of immigration.   People interested in the immigration issue who are not Christian might also find it helpful to understand the Biblical perspective.

To quote again, May the Lord illumine us and grant us understanding.

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