Book Review: Army Wives

Book Review: Army Wives by Midge Gillies

Disclaimer:  I received a copy of this book through a Goodreads giveaway for the purpose of writing this review.  No other compensation was requested or offered.

Army Wives

The life of a soldier is hard and often dangerous, but the life of a soldier’s spouse has its hardships and hazards as well.  This book collects the stories of various British Army wives from the Crimean War (where wives sometimes shared tents near the front lines with their husbands) to the modern day, when social media allows spouses (now including husbands) to worry about the servicemember’s safety in “real time.”

After chapters on spousal travel and accommodations, the remainder of the book is in roughly chronological order.  There tends to be more information on officers’ wives than those of enlisted men, as especially in the early days they were more likely to be literate and thus leave behind letters, journals and memoirs.  Most of the women covered are ordinary people who rose to the occasion, but there’s also Lady Elizabeth Butler, who was a famous painter even before marrying a famous soldier.

The epilogue is about life after the army, both in the general sense, and the fates of the specific women used as examples in the book.  There’s a nice center section of pictures, many in color, plus a bibliography, end notes and an index.

As always, learning about the lives of people in unusual circumstances is fascinating, and there is quite a variety of women and outcomes represented.  The writing is decent, and some sections are emotionally affecting.

On the other hand, covering so many different stories means that some feel as though they’ve gotten short shrift.  Edith Tolkien, for example, gets two pages, mostly about the codes her husband (J.R.R.) slipped into his letters to let her know where he was.  And the section on soldiers who came home from World War One with facial disfigurements has no direct testimony from wives at all.

That said, this book should be of interest to those interested in military history (especially about women in military history) and those considering being the spouse of a military person.

And now, a video of the British Army Wives’ Chorus:

 

Anime Review: Samurai Flamenco

Anime Review: Samurai Flamenco

Masayoshi Hazama is an up and coming male model with a superhero fixation.  Since superheroes don’t exist in real life, Masayoshi decides to become the first, as non-powered masked hero Samurai Flamenco.  He goes out to fight minor crime like jaywalking and littering, and it doesn’t go well.  His first adventure winds up with his costume being burned, but he meets kindly police officer Hidenori Goto.

Samurai Flamenco

The first few episodes are a reasonably realistic depiction of what it might take to be a real-life “superhero” in a world where none of the usual comic book plot devices apply.  Until suddenly we learn that maybe this isn’t the normal world after all, and monsters and villains are real…or are they?   Each plot twist takes things further down the rabbit hole until it seems to wrap all the way back around to the beginning.

This anime series by Manglobe ran from October 2013-March 2014.   Discussing too much of the plot and character development would be highly spoilery, so the best I can say is that the major mysteries of the storyline are explained to most people’s satisfaction.  Some minor matters are not given any resolution–they take place in the normal world setting, where we don’t always get proper closure.

A couple of content advisories:  Masayoshi has a habit of winding up naked or shirtless.  There’s also a couple of torture scenes, the show does a pretty good job of warning you they’re coming up, but people who are triggered by that might want to skip those scenes and have a friend describe the plot.  Oh, and one character is way too fond of kicking men where it hurts.

This show is not for everyone–it starts slow, and is more realistic than some superhero fans may like, then takes a series of roller-coaster twists that might throw off the fans of more down-to-earth fare.  But for those who persevere, there is a reward in a show that deals with the nature of our relationship with heroes, and the way we compensate for the brokenness inside us.

Book Review: Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion

Book Review: Stitched Up: The Anti-Capitalist Book of Fashion by Tansy E Hoskins

Disclaimer:  I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

Stitched Up

Fashion…isn’t something I notice a lot.  I buy clothes when I have to, and try to wear matching socks, but I don’t know a lot about fashion as a subject.  This book may or may not have helped with that.

Early on, Ms. Hoskins defines fashion as “changing styles of dress and appearance adopted by groups of people” so that she can talk about the entire clothing and accessories industry, as opposed to just haute couture.  She chooses to view the industry through an “anti-capitalist” lens, which yes, does take its roots from Marxism.

The book primarily deals with the modern fashion industry, from the Industrial Revolution on, and doesn’t dwell too much on the early history.  The first few chapters provide an overview of the industry, from the wealthy owners through the fashion press to the exploited factory workers.  It should be noted here that this is a British book, and this influences the examples given.

Then there is a section about the many problematic issues involving fashion, such as environmental damage,  body image and racism.  (The recent film biography of Coco Chanel cut off before World War Two for a reason.)  There’s  a fair bit in here that I already knew, but I had no idea of just how bad it actually was.

The final chapters of the book deal with ways in which people are resisting, and trying to reform fashion, but Ms. Hoskins believes that all the problems with the fashion industry are at their roots caused by capitalism.  Therefore, revolution to smash capitalism is the only true solution.

The last chapter goes into some detail of what post-capitalist fashion might involve.  The author points out the (sadly short-lived) blossoming of the arts and textile design in the post-revolution Soviet Union.  However, the cautionary tale of Cultural Revolution China is also mentioned, where a simple outlawing of “reactionary” fashion led to nationwide conformity because the Mao suit was the only thing everyone could agree was not reactionary, and therefore safe to wear.

Ms. Hoskins is thinking that revolution should instead lead to more of a democratic socialism…or something.  Anyway, smash capitalism, and everything else should work out okay.

The striking illustrations are by Jade Pilgrom.  There are extensive end notes, a bibliography and index.

I’d recommend this book to students of fashion, budding Socialists and people who have always wondered what the big deal is with fashion, anyway.

Book Review: Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town

Book Review: Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town by Mirta Ojito

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

Hunting Season

In 2008, an Ecuadorian immigrant, Marcelo Lucero, was murdered by a group of teenagers in Patchouge,  New York.  They had been looking for “Mexicans” to beat up in that suburb of New York City.  This shocking crime made headlines, and exposed a lot of raw nerves about immigration issues in America.

Mirta Ojito is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, and briefly talks about her own experience as a Cuban refugee.

Much of the book is taken up by short biographies of the people involved in the case one way or another, from the victim to the killers to the mayor of Patchouge.  (None of the people convicted of the murder consented to be interviewed for the book, and only two of their parents, so some biographies are very short.)

There’s a look at the various circumstances that combined to make the incident happen:  demographic shifts, a changed pattern of immigration that brought unassimilated migrants straight to suburbia instead of the inner city, racism, economic woes, portrayal in the media of immigrants as “invaders”, small town boredom, and a poisonous political atmosphere.

The mayor of Patchouge, Paul Pontieri, comes off pretty well.   He was late realizing that there was a problem with anti-immigrant violence in his town, but actually had plans for dealing with it just before the killing took place.  The tragedy accelerated those plans.

By comparison,  Steve Levy, county executive of Suffolk County, comes off pretty badly.   He campaigned on fairly heavy anti-immigration policies, even co-founding a group called Mayors and Executives for Immigration Reform that seeks local ordinances to restrict undocumented immigrants further than they already are.  But he never specifically called for violence.

As well as the effect on Patchouge of immigration issues and the murder, the book looks at the effect these have had on Lucero’s home town of  Gualaceo.  The money sent home by migrants has allowed the town to become prosperous again after years of economic depression, but at the cost of its hardest-working and most ambitious citizens

As the book points out, this was neither the first or last time an immigrant was killed by Americans for the sin of not being “one of us”, but perhaps we can learn lessons here to lessen future violence, and find new ways of incorporating immigrants into our society.

Recommended for true crime readers, and those interested in immigration issues.  Check it out at your library.

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