Movie Review: Destroy All Monsters

Movie Review: Destroy All Monsters

It is the close of the Twentieth Century, and the United Nations has achieved two major goals.  There is now a permanent scientific base on the moon, and a way has been found to safely and humanely contain Earth’s giant monsters on a remote island dubbed Kaijuland (Monsterland in the dub.)   World peace also seems to have been achieved but no one directly says so.

Destroy All Monsters
It took most of the movie to get here, but at last we have all the monsters!

Of course, it would be a pretty dull monster movie if the status quo remained that way, so shortly after a UFO is seen lurking near the moon base, a mysterious gas cuts off all contact with Kaijuland.  Soon, the monsters that should be on the island are spotted in capital cities around the world, destroying property and causing death…except in Tokyo.  That arouses suspicion since Japan is the closest large land mass near Kaijuland, and all the monsters normally gravitate there.

Captain Katsuo Yamabe and the crew of the spaceship Moonlight SY-3 are assigned to investigate.  They are shocked to discover that the staff of Monsterland (including Captain Yamabe’s sweetheart Kyoko Manabe) are now cheerfully directing the monsters to attack using previously unknown technology.  It turns out that aliens called Kilaaks are responsible.  The Kilaak have decided to colonize Earth and they’re not keen on human civilization.

Most of the movie is Captain Yamabe and his allies investigating the Kilaak threat and attempting to find some way of breaking their mind control over humans and monsters, with sporadic monster attacks to spice things up.  But in the final reel, we are treated to the kaiju battle action we’ve been waiting for, as Godzilla and the other Earth monsters go up against the Kilaak and space monster King Ghidorah.

This 1968 film is considered one of the weaker entries in the Godzilla franchise, as the writers had largely run out of good ideas, and the monsters weren’t really scary anymore.  The plot is thin and the acting minimal.  But it’s got that cool monster battle at the end, with Minilla actually being useful for a moment.  I also appreciate the optimistic future in which humanity lives and lets live with its giant monsters.

As of this writing, both subbed and dubbed versions are up on Crunchyroll, and recommended to kaiju fans as a pleasant popcorn movie.

Anime Review: InuYasha Movie 4: Fire on the Mystic Island

Anime Review: InuYasha Movie 4: Fire on the Mystic Island

Once upon a time, Horai Island was a peaceful land where humans and youkai (Japanese monsters, called “demons” in the dub) lived in harmony.  To protect themselves and their hanyou (“half-demon”) children from less tolerant mainlanders, the people of Horai erected a magical barrier that made the island inaccessible from normal reality, only resurfacing, Brigadoon-like, once every fifty years.  Unfortunately, during one of the brief access points, Horai was invaded and conquered by demons calling themselves “The Four War Gods.”

Inyasha Movie 4: Fire on the Mystic Island

Fifty years ago, the hanyou known as Inuyasha and his then companion, the priestess Kikyo, stumbled across the island and had an inconclusive battle with the War Gods before the access ended.   Now the barrier has lifted again, and one of the handful of hanyou children who have so far survived the War Gods’ cruel rule manages to escape temporarily.  She promptly runs into Inuyasha and his new friends, who decide to do something about the situation.

This animated movie is based on the anime adaptation of Rumiko Takahashi’s shounen (boys’) manga, InuYasha.  The manga is about a modern schoolgirl, Kagome, who travels through time to Japan’s Warring States era.  There she runs into Inuyasha, the son of a powerful dog demon and a mortal woman.  Despite some initial misunderstandings, Kagome joins Inuyasha in a quest for the pieces of the Jewel of Four Souls, which will allow the lad to become fully youkai or fully human (he says the former, but there are hints he might choose the latter.)  Along the way, they gather a group of quirky companions, and a couple of people who show up often but never formally become their friends.

It’s somewhat of a tradition for animation companies in Japan that are producing a long-run TV series to also put out movie-length features timed for Golden Week (a series of national holidays that all come within a week in spring) or the summer break so kids and anime fans have something to go to movie theaters for.  (And even other folks if the weather is bad.)   These stories are generally self-contained; fans can tell approximately where in the series the story would fit in, but often there is no actual space for it to go, and they almost never affect the continuity of the main series (or are even mentioned in it!)

This one is a bit special as it came out during a hiatus between the main InuYasha series and the second one which adapted the final plotline from the manga.  As such, it’s a bit of a farewell performance for those production people who didn’t get picked up for the later show.

For fans of the anime, this is a treat with all the favorite recurring characters (even if they have to be shoehorned in) and running gags.  There’s exciting action, all the main characters get a cool moment, and the Four War Gods (based on the four directional gods) are hissable and powerful.  There are also some parts with better animation than the TV show thanks to a higher budget.

For those coming in cold, however, this movie probably isn’t the place to start.  For example, the story just assumes the viewer knows the elaborate backstories of Kikyo (now undead) and Sesshomaru (Inuyasha’s full-demon half-brother) and doesn’t explain them at all, which is likely to be baffling to the first-timer.   (Especially as there is a second Kikyo running around for a while!)  The War Gods don’t get much characterization beyond “like beating people up and resent being thwarted.”

While this is most assuredly a kids’ movie, sensitive parents should be aware that there is a certain amount of blood mixed in with the fantasy and slapstick violence, and there’s some non-graphic female nudity.  Also, Miroku the fallen monk engages in some sexual harassment of professional demon hunter Sango, and this is played for laughs.

Recommended primarily to InuYasha fans who somehow missed it before; newcomers should try the first few volumes of the manga or the beginning of the TV anime instead.

 

Movie Review: When Marnie Was There

Movie Review: When Marnie Was There directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi

Anna is an orphan with asthma and alienation issues.  When she is sent to a rural village for the fresh air, Anna believes her foster parents are just dumping her on their friends  for the summer.  But the area certainly isn’t a bad place to be, and her hosts are gracious.  Anna starts making sketches of the nearby Marsh House.

When Marnie Was There

Anna is told that the Marsh House is long abandoned, and when she peeps in the windows, it certainly appears to be.  But sometimes there are lights, and a girl named Marnie that seems very interested in meeting Anna.  Are Anna’s experiences just dreams by a lonely girl…or is Marnie very real after all?

People who are only slightly acquainted with anime might think it is only kiddie shows designed to sell toys and lurid sex & violence shows for “mature viewers”, but Japanese animators also have a long tradition of creating adaptations of classic children’s literature.  In this case, it’s a relatively obscure British book by Joan G. Robinson, done by Studio Ghibli (Spirited Away).

The setting is swapped from Norfolk to rural Japan, but this does little violence to the story.  Indeed, Anna’s unusually blue eyes become part of the reason she feels like an outsider, and she’s very sensitive about them.

There are some mildly scary bits, and Marnie’s background turns out to be quite sad, so parents of younger viewers should watch this with them.  But it’s a gentle story that unfolds slowly and to a certain degree predictably.  Anna learns that she isn’t as unloved as she thought, that she has connections, and even becomes able to make friends in the ordinary world.

As usual with Ghibli, the art is beautiful, with many views of lived-in houses, watery landscapes and rolling green hills.  The Japanese voice acting is excellent, and there are some fine voices in the dub as well.  There’s some odd staging of the first few scenes between Marnie and Anna that make it come off like the start of a romantic relationship; presumably this is due to Japanese cultural differences, because that is not what Marnie has in mind.

Worth looking into if you have enjoyed other Ghibli films, or have children around twelve (Anna’s age) to watch it with.  Also consider reading the book; the movie gave it a boost, so you may be able to find it at finer libraries.

 

Movie Review: Bender’s Game

Movie Review: Bender’s Game

Futurama was a science-fiction cartoon created by Matt Groening (The Simpsons) for the Fox Broadcasting Company.   It starred Philip J. Fry, a New York City pizza delivery worker who is “accidentally” cryogenically frozen for a thousand years.  In the bizarre future world, Fry has trouble fitting in at first, but quickly becomes employed by his distant descendant, eccentric scientist Hubert J. Farnsworth, as a delivery person for one-ship operation Planet Express.

Bender's Game

Fry befriends vice-ridden robot Bender and violence-prone cyclops Leela, who join him at the delivery company.  Other employees include fussy bureaucrat Hermes, naive intern Amy, completely incompetent lobster doctor Zoidberg and Scruffy the janitor.  They went on to have many comedic adventures on network TV from 1999 to 2003.

The Fox executives never particularly liked Futurama, despite or perhaps because of its critical acclaim, so the scheduling was erratic at best.  Eventually, it was not so much cancelled as not scheduled for a year.   A couple of years later, Comedy Central picked the show up for syndication, and helped fund four direct to DVD movies in 2008, of which Bender’s Game is the third.

In one plotline, Bender learns to play the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons™ which is a bit difficult for him as he has never really used his imagination before.  He makes a breakthrough, but it turns out that as a robot, his imagination gets the better of him, making him delusional, living in a fantasy world based on the campaign.  Bender is institutionalized.

In the other main plotline, the price of “dark matter” fuel is skyrocketing due to a purported shortage.   Leela’s pet Nibbler (actually a superintelligent being) produces dark matter as excrement, which helps.  But evil corporate mogul Mom owns the only dark matter mine and her monopoly allows her to set any price she wants.  Professor Farnsworth reveals that he has a method to break Mom’s monopoly, but it can only be done inside the mine itself.

The two plotlines combine when dark matter inside Bender is stimulated by…events…and his imagination transforms the world into his fantasy adventure.  The situation in that world is a twisted mirror of the previous events, and the transformed Planet Express crew must fulfill their quest lest the universe fall to darkness!  Oh, and there’s a surprise revelation about one of the minor characters.

It’s obvious the writers and voice actors had a ball making this, with all the D&D references and other pop-culture bits (Ender’s Game is not referenced beyond the title.)   While it will help to have seen some episodes of the series before, the loose continuity of Futurama should allow most viewers to catch on quickly.  Past events that are important are referenced in the movie itself.

The movie is designed to split into four episodes for showing in syndication, and it’s pretty obvious where the transitions are supposed to take place.

If you are new to the series, you should be aware that cartoon nudity crops up every so often, and all the characters will turn into jerks whenever it’s convenient for a joke.  (Bender is almost always a jerk.)  One thing I wasn’t too keen on is that this movie leans heavily on potty humor, well beyond what is called for by the plot.

After the movies, there was another season of regular episodes, but then the show was canceled again so it may not be coming back.

Recommended for anyone who’s ever played Dungeons & Dragons™.

 

 

Movie Review: Tokyo Gore School

Movie Review: Tokyo Gore School

Fujiwara leads a double life.  He’s the leader of a gang of high school bullies, and also the teacher-trusted student president.  He’s reasonably comfortable with this, having a binary view of life.  There are winners and losers, and he’s determined to be a winner.   Fujiwara is baffled, however, when he’s suddenly being chased on the street by complete strangers.

Tokyo Gore School

It turns out that Fujiwara is listed as one of the participants of something called the “Chain Game.”  Your data is listed on a cell phone-accessible website, allowing people to track you down.  If you capture the other person’s phone, you learn their darkest secret, and gain points that can be used to erase parts of your data, making it harder to track you.  If you lose, then your secret is out.  A lot of the involuntary participants default to violence as a means of getting cell phones, thus the “gore” in the title.

While some of the secrets are just embarrassing, like having your mom sew your name into your underwear, others are much more dangerous, and Fujiwara will find himself doing anything he must to avoid his secret getting out.  Oh, and the vaguely described “School Justice Bill” the government just passed may have something to do with all this.

This is a 2009 Japanese movie, currently available on the Crunchyroll website.  It’s an “R” for gory violence (which takes a while to get there–the first few fights are relatively bloodless.)  Also on the content front are suicide, rape (off-screen), torture and some rough language.

As you might guess from the plot description, Fujiwara is more protagonist than hero.  He does defend a young woman, but its for his own purposes. He’s invited to join a large group that’s using numbers to protect itself, but declines.  While he’s correct about the deficiencies of the strategy, his refusal is what causes that group to fracture.

Fujiwara’s antagonist for most of the movie, though it takes him a while to figure it out, is his ambitious lieutenant Todoroki, who enjoys violence for its own sake; the other bullies are stupid and easily led.

The movie has some nasty twists towards the end, and its philosophy becomes nihilistic in the negative sense.  There’s some nifty fight sequences, and the gore doesn’t get too overdone.

If teenagers fighting to the death as part of a game is your thing, this isn’t nearly as good as Battle Royale or Hunger Games but is enjoyable on its own terms.

Movie Review: Reet, Petite and Gone

Movie Review: Reet, Petite and Gone

Years ago, Schuyler Jarvis (Louis Jordan) was a young entertainer who fell in love with a woman named Lovey Lynn (Bea Griffith.)  She liked him plenty too, but her mother disapproved because Jarvis was a poor man, and forced Lovey to break off the affair.  Lovey was married to a wealthy gentleman and had a daughter named Honey Carter (also Bea Griffith) while Jarvis married some other woman and had a son named Louis Jarvis (also Louis Jordan.)

Reet, Petite, and Gone

Lovey passed some time back, and Schuyler, now quite wealthy in his own right, is on his deathbed.   He’s determined to marry his bandleader son to Honey, and sets up his will to ensure this by specifying the exact physical dimensions of the woman Louis must marry to inherit the dough.

Crooked lawyer Henry Talbot (Lorenzo Tucker) sees an opportunity to profit and alters the will to make it appear that the required woman matches the description of his secretary Rusty (Vanita Smythe.)  He also heads off Honey and her friend June (June Richmond) at the airport, attempting to get them to fly back to New Orleans.  (June is a savvy woman and keeps the bribe he gives them so the girls can use it as the first month’s rent on an apartment.)

Talbot initially gets away with it because Schuyler passes away before Louis can get back from the radio station he’s performing at.  He’s repulsed by Rusty and wonders if perhaps he can skip the inheritance.  His manager Sam Adams (Milton Woods) reminds him that they’re about to put on a Broadway show, and the money would sure come in handy.  Then the show biz men get an idea.   They’ll scout for another woman with the same dimensions as Rusty but more palatable by claiming it’s a beauty contest/audition for the show.

This doesn’t go so well, apparently Rusty is unique among women.  However, Honey hasn’t been able to find a job and winds up at the Jarvis mansion to audition.   She doesn’t match the altered criteria either, but she’s able to remind Louis of who she is, and the two hit it off well.

Talbot manages to get one of the show’s backers to bail out, now making it absolutely essential for Louis to inherit if he doesn’t want to close the show before opening and become box office poison.  Things are looking pretty dire, and Louis must make his marriage decision before midnight.  At the last moment, Dolph the aged butler (David Bethea) reveals that he’s been holding a trump card….

This is another “race” picture,  where the cast and crew are all black, designed to air in segregated theaters.    This gave actors who normally got stuck with roles as maids and comic relief the chance to shine.   It’s also a musical and as such a showcase for Mr. Jordan and his Tympani Five band.  As such, there are multiple swing numbers, three of them before the plotline even starts!

Ms. Griffith was apparently not a particularly good singer, so the film avoids her breaking into song as much as possible.  Instead, we’re treated to a couple of fine numbers by June Richmond.  (She’d actually have made a better female lead, I think, but was too heavy-set for Hollywood to give her that role.)

The fan service is heavy in this film–the showgirl costumes and bathing suits are at least plot-relevant, but there’s a scene of Ms. Griffith in her underwear when she didn’t need to be.  (Really obvious when Ms. Richmond is in the same scene, fully clothed.)  Mr. Jordan’s taste for fine-looking ladies is treated as being a lovable scamp.  But the next to last song in the movie is a misogynist screed “Ain’t That Just Like a Woman?”, that really jarred when the finale is “If It’s Love You Want, Baby, That;s Me.”

As such, if you are watching this with younger viewers, you might want to discuss the harmful effects of casual misogyny

The Mill Creek edition of this movie cuts off just before the resolution of the plot; the Internet Archive print is complete, but has much worse picture quality.

Movie Review: Private Buckaroo

Movie Review: Private Buckaroo

When bandleader and trumpeter Harry James (playing himself) is drafted, his entire band enlists to accompany him.   However, his main vocalist, Lon Prentice (Dick Foran) is initially classified 4-F due to a foot problem.  One visit to the doctor later, Lon is cured and can enlist with the other fellows.

Private Buckaroo

However, the vain Lon is already an expert shot and finds most Army training and menial duties below him.  To everyone else’s surprise, the base commander (Ernest Truex) gives the order that Lon is excused from any training or duties he doesn’t want to do.  At first, he doesn’t mind, even though his fellow trainees are giving him the stinkeye when they get saddled with his guard rotations.  It’s not until Lon learns that he won’t be shipping out with the rest of the boys, but assigned to a rear echelon desk job that his attitude changes.

Meanwhile, First Sergeant “Muggsy” Shavel (Shemp Howard) is in a rocky relationship with his fiancee Bonnie-Belle Schlopkiss (Mary Wickes).  Not only is she rather shrewish, but USO entertainer Lancelot Pringle McBiff (Joe E. Lewis) is making time with her, and she doesn’t seem at all reluctant.

This 1942 musical is essentially a recruiting film for the Army put out by Universal Studios.  In addition to the above mentioned entertainers, the Andrews Sisters feature heavily.  The more unpleasant aspects of boot camp are skipped over entirely, and it ends with a montage of our brave boys shipping out.

There’s a fair amount of slapstick humor, with Sergeant Shavel taking the brunt of most of it.  The fact that Bonnie-Belle is the dominant one in their relationship is played for laughs, but the domestic violence won’t play as well with a modern audience.  There’s also some period slurs against the Japanese, in keeping with the subject matter.

As part of the mildly military aspect, the base commanders’ nieces have pretty much free run, especially precocious tyke Tagalong (Susan Levine), who gets some of the best lines.

The musical numbers are well worth seeing, but the previously mentioned content may make it a no-go for younger viewers without parental guidance.

Here’s a trailer for the movie.

 

 

Movie Review: Trocadero (1944)

Movie Review: Trocadero (1944)

Hollywood columnist Erskine Johnson (playing himself) needs a story for his Sunday slot, and goes to his favorite nightclub, the Trocadero.  It’s hopping as usual, but headwaiter Sam (Ralph Morgan) finds a moment between celebrity cameos and musical numbers to talk to the columnist.  He reveals that things were not always so rosy here….

Trocadero

The club used to be Tony Rocadero’s Restaurant, and we see the owner (Charles Calvert) at the end of Prohibition getting a legitimate liquor license.  He wants to turn his place into a class joint for the sake of his adopted children Judy and Johnny Edwards (Rosemary Lane & Johnny Downs.)   Unfortunately, he is killed in a street accident.  There’s only enough income from the restaurant to send one of the kids to college; the other will have to stay and help manage the place.

Johnny goes off to earn a degree while Judy takes over as acting manager and star singer of the night spot.  They struggle along until in 1935, the place is broke and about to close its doors.  Musical agent Mickey Jones (Sheldon Leonard) buys ten percent of the business as he’s convinced it can be revived with a new jazz band he’s representing.  Even this might not have worked, but then swing band leader Spike Nelson (Dick Purcell) barges in with his own musical troupe, and Judy takes the risk of having two house bands.

It’s obvious that both Jones and Nelson have more than a business interest in Judy, but she’s got a nightclub to run.  A slip of the tongue renames the place the Trocadero, it shifts emphasis from dining to dancing, and business heats up.

Some time later, Johnny has finally graduated from college, and returns.  Problem!  He’s fallen in love with society dame Marge Carson (Marjorie Manners), whose father (Emmett Vogan) owns a tobacco brokerage.  She’s less than enthused by the tawdry entertainment industry, and wants Johnny to join her father’s business.  So he can’t take over the Trocadero after all.

Judy has her own problems.  Jones is more or less okay with just being friends, but Nelson feels he’s been strung along too long and accepts another gig.  Only after he leaves does Judy realize that she actually loves the lug.

Meanwhile, Johnny discovers at the engagement party that Marge’s relatives are deadly dull people who care only for money and prestige, and look down on “hoofers” like himself.  He dances a fiery rebuttal and calls off the marriage.  He returns to the Trocadero to console his lovelorn sister and finally help manage the place, which is more popular than ever.

Which brings us back to the present day.    But this is a Hollywood musical, and there’s no way it’s going to end on a bittersweet note.

There was a real-life Trocadero nightclub, one of Hollywood’s hottest spots, but its history was nothing like this movie’s version.  Still, it’s a sweet story in its own way, a fantasy of making it in show business.  There are several fun musical numbers, including a grand finale with four, count ’em, four bands combining their talents.  One song in the modern section obliquely references World War Two, which was going on at the time.

As mentioned, there are several celebrity cameos, the most unusual of which is animator Dave Fleischer, with a little cartoon creature that comes out of his pen.

There’s of course lots of drinking, but the cigarette girl isn’t too keen on smoking (at least the Carson brand.)   Johnny and Judy do some playful scuffling, and have perhaps a bit too much chemistry for siblings, but that and the slightly offscreen death of Tony are it on the violence front.  By 1940s standards the movie is surprisingly non-sexist; no one thinks Judy can’t run a nightclub just because she’s a woman.

This is a lovely confection, fun but not very deep, and should be okay to watch with younger viewers.

Movie Review: All-American Co-Ed

Movie Review: All-American Co-Ed

The movie starts with chorus girls’ feet and legs kicking behind the title sequence.  Then the camera is pulled back and we discover that the “chorus girls” are all men.  The Zeta Fraternity of all-male Quinceton University are putting on a drag revue.

All-American Co-Ed

Matilda Collinge (Esther Dale) sees a description (but no pictures) in the paper and strongly disapproves.  As president of Mar Brynn Horticultural College, she would never allow such shenanigans on her all-female campus.   Still, enrollment has been falling off, and the college needs something to boost its profile.

Matilda’s publicist Hap Holden (Harry Langdon), a newspaperman, and her niece Virginia Collinge (Frances Langford) come up with an idea.  Rather than only admitting upper-crust girls, this year the college will offer scholarships to twelve young women from across the country who’ve won contests with their produce (who also look pretty.)

As an additional attention-grabber, these scholarship students will be referred to as “likely to succeed” in direct contrast to the loathsome oafs of Quinceton’s Zeta fraternity.  When this dig comes to the boys’ attention, they decide to dress up Bob Sheppard (Johnny Downs) as Flower Queen Bobbie DeWolfe and submit that picture.  Bobbie is chosen, so now Bob must go undercover as his alter ego, to seek revenge for the Mar Brynn slight.  Hilarity ensues.

This 1941 musical comedy has a disclaimer that “any resemblance to actual college life is purely coincidental.”  It’s from a time when “man in a dress” was considered comedy gold all by itself, and then adds some gags.  Let’s face it, Bobbie desperately trying to not be unmasked before “she” achieves her goal leads to some pleasant silliness.  I note that the disguise is helped by fashions of the day giving every young woman linebacker shoulders.

The first few songs are good, but the final agriculture-themed performance just drags on with labored rhymes.

Less good stuff:  There’s 1940s-style sexism, as Virginia declares, “Girls don’t want minds, Auntie, they want a husband!”  One comedic sequence turns on the stereotype of black people being superstitious and a little dim.  And sexual harassment is played for laughs, because it is just so hi-larious when a man is doing it to another man under the impression he’s a woman.

You may not want to watch this one with younger viewers in light of the last thing, or be prepared to remind them that in real life sexual harassment’s not funny.

This was nominated for two Oscars, so clearly has some merit, but it’s a specialty taste.

Movie Review: Till the Clouds Roll By

Movie Review: Till the Clouds Roll By

This 1946 musical, filmed in glorious Technicolor, is loosely based on the life of songwriter Jerome Kern (Robert Walker).  It opens with the opening of Showboat, the famous Oscar Hammerstein play he wrote the music for.  After several numbers, we skip to the end of the performance.  Mr. Kern asks his chauffeur to take him to a certain neighborhood that has special meaning to him, and we go into a long flashback.

Till the Clouds Roll By

This turns out to be the beginning of his long relationship with music arranger James Hessler (Van Heflin) and his daughter Sally (Joan Wells/Lucille Bremer.  Mr. Hessler is tired of silly love songs and wanting to write a symphony, but Mr. Kern’s music convinces him to arrange again.

Things aren’t doing too well on Broadway, and Mr. Kern has to travel all the way to England, where he meets his future wife, before he can convince a producer to take a chance on an American songwriter.  After a near miss with the Lusitania, Kern and Hessler finally find success with a hit show.

As the years pass, Sally becomes convinced she wants to  be in show business, and Mr. Kern is able to swing her a plum spot in his latest production.  However, the producer of the show takes away Sally’s big number and gives it to established star Marilyn Miller (Judy Garland).  Sally has a fit and runs away to seek her own fortune, not even returning when her father dies.

Distraught after his friend’s death, Mr. Kern is unable to write until  he finally finds Sally singing in a club near the Mississippi, determined to succeed on her own merits.  Heartened, he is also inspired by the river to create the music heard in Showboat.   The flashback over, Mr. Kern worries that this is the natural end to his career.  The chauffeur assures him that it’s not, and drives him to the afterparty.

A quick montage of success later, the now elderly Kern is brought to Hollywood to do music for the movies, and is pleased to see that Sally is by complete coincidence the star of the one he’s working on.  The movie ends with a medley of Kern hits.

Like many musicals, the plot is a little thin, but there are some great musical numbers sung by such luminaries as Angela Lansbury, Lena Horne and Frank Sinatra.  And it’s in color, which is always nice.

One interesting bit; the parts with Judy Garland were shot early, and with a different director, Vincente Minnelli, as she was pregnant at the time and they wanted to make sure she wouldn’t show.  Jerome Kern was still alive at this point and visited the set shortly before he passed.

Thankfully, there’s no overt sexism or racism in the movie, although the latter is in the metatext–Lena Horne’s number is carefully framed so that it could be removed by Southern theater owners without causing a noticeable gap, and there are two versions of “Old Man River”, one with a black performer (as part of Showboat) and then at the end with young Frank Sinatra in an all-white showcase.

The romance is kept nice and clean.  There’s some smoking and drinking–one scene takes place during Prohibition with the booze served literally under the table.

This film is in the public domain, so easily findable, and well worth it for the musical numbers alone.

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