Book Review: Herblock’s Here and Now

Book Review: Herblock’s Here and Now by Herbert Block

Shortly after reviewing Herblock at Large, I discovered this volume in the local used book store.  It was published in 1955, and contains many of Mr. Block’s political cartoons from the early 1950s.

Herblock's Here and Now

This included his Pulitzer-winning Joseph McCarthy work; Herblock appears to have actually coined the word “McCarthyism” for the witch hunt-like anti-Communist grandstanding so popular at the time.  Mr. Block was pleased to be able to speak of the senator’s career in the past tense.

There is quite a bit more prose here than in the 1980s volume, helpful as I am less familiar with the period.  Some prominent figures who feature in multiple cartoons are lost in the mists of history now, remembered perhaps only by their hometowns.   President Eisenhower comes in for quite a bit of ribbing, but his treatment is gentle compared to that of Vice President Nixon, who is depicted as crawling out of a sewer.

The John Q. Public figure is seen quite frequently in these Fifties cartoons, a short, bespectacled fellow who is much put upon.  He seems to have vanished by the 1980s, replaced by more varied civilians.   Also a frequent visitor to the editorial page is Atomic War, a stylized atomic bomb wearing the helmet of Ares.  He’s usually grinning menacingly, always ready to threaten.

Of resonance to today’s situation are the cartoons on the refugee crisis, thousands still displaced after World War Two, and the U.S. only allowing in a trickle–and under great suspicion at that.

Copyright 1955 by Herbert Block.
Copyright 1955 by Herbert Block.

The Soviet Union was considered a huge threat, and so was covered in detail as well–but Herblock reminds us that he has no inside information, so his depictions may be highly misleading as to what was actually going on inside the U.S.S.R.  There’s also some commentary on the U.S. habit of  supporting dictators and other unpleasant people in the name of containing Communism–this would come home to roost many times in the coming decades.

There’s surprisingly little on the civil rights struggle, only mentioned as part of a broader concern for American’s freedoms under the Constitution.

This one will probably be a bit harder to find, but highly recommended for fans of editorial cartooning, and those wanting a window into the early 1950s.

Magazine Review: Lapham’s Quarterly: Spring 2015 Swindle & Fraud

Magazine Review: Lapham’s Quarterly: Spring 2015 Swindle & Fraud Edited by Lewis H. Lapham

Mr. Lapham’s literary magazine is based on the principle that history has much to teach the present on many subjects, so presents excerpts from many famous (and not so famous) authors on a loose topic for the education and entertainment of its readers.  This issue covers swindle & fraud, and the topic of lying and stealing more generally.

Lapham;s Quarterly Spring 2015

The pieces are all short, none more than six pages, and most hanging around the two-three page mark.  A long time spectrum is covered, from the classic Trojan Horse gag to the sub-prime mortgage bubble of the 2000s.   After a lengthy editor’s introduction, we start with Lawrence Osborne buying his own death certificate.  Through many authors we proceed to Oscar Wilde’s short play “The Decay of Lying.”Along the way we hear from Charles Ponzi (his original scheme was legal, but he couldn’t raise money for it without resorting to fraud) and Malcolm X’s thoughts on how white politicians lie to black people to get their votes.

There are a few original essays to round out the issue, “Rogue Wounds” by Daniel Mason, on faking illness; “We Buy Broken Gold” by Clancy Martin , on the retail buying of precious metals and gems; and “A Fish Tale” by David Samuels, about Herman Melville and the nature of fiction in Moby Dick.

The issue is profusely illustrated with classic artworks and other depictions of the theme, infographics and short quotes.   Everything is properly attributed, or at least it appears to be.

The general selection of items is high quality, and since they’re short, if a particular piece doesn’t interest you, another one will be along quickly.  It helps that crime and corruption are such interesting topics.  The shortness does however mean that most of the topics are only touched upon in the briefest of terms and you will want to investigate further if a given one interests you.

Highly recommended for strong readers who have limited time at any sitting.

Magazine Review: Pirate Stories November 1934

Magazine Review: Pirate Stories November 1934 

Some of the pulp magazines went for very specialized subjects, so it’s not a surprise to find one dedicated entirely to stories about pirates.  As this was the first issue, there’s an publisher’s note indicating that there will be stories about pirate of the past, present and future (it is after all a Gernsback publication.)  The cover is by Sidney Riesenberg, and is not related to any of the features inside.

Pirate Stories November 1934

“Pirate Guns” by F.V.W. Mason is the lead feature.  Nathan Andrews,  born in the colony of South Carolina, was a faithful member of the British Navy until he was falsely accused and convicted of aiding deserters.   Clapped in irons and being shipped off to Australia, Nathan reinvents himself as “Captain Terror,” and convinces his fellow convicts to join him in piracy if he can get them free.   Their escape attempt is treacherously exposed, but this proves a stroke of luck when they’re isolated in maximum security while everyone else on the ship dies of smallpox.  (This saves Nathan having to kill Naval officers.)

The plague ship wrecked, the remaining escapees are able to take over a slave ship (coincidentally freeing the slaves) which they refit for privateering as the Santee.  Captain Terror disdains the democracy usually practiced by pirates of the period, emulating the rank structure and discipline of the British Navy he was trained by.  This makes the Santee an unusually well-run ship, that only attacks other pirates, but they become blamed for other pirates’ bloody massacres.

Eventually, circumstances change–the American Revolution has started, and Captain Terror is hired as part of the new American Navy as Captain Andrews of the Charleston.  He’s able to get revenge on the faithless “friend” who perjured himself to get Andrews out of the way, and learns his beloved never gave in to the traitor’s advances.  Happy ending for everyone but the Irish doctor, who dies in the final battle.

It’s a rip-roaring story, but goes out of its way to make Captain Terror a “good” pirate.   It skirts around the issue of slavery, not mentioning where the slaves were headed, and the freed people have no lines or personality.  Much is made of corruption in the British Navy poisoning their fine traditions.

“Scourge of the Main” by James Perley Hughes involves another American colonial serving on a British ship, but in an earlier period when England is at war with Spain.  Daniel Tucker is from New England, and serves on a privateer that is hunting Spanish treasure ships.   However, Jolly Roger Hawkins is also after those ships,   And he’s a full-on pirate who doesn’t want to share, especially when “his” woman decides she’d rather sail with Tucker.

The author really stacks the deck, making Tucker tall, blond, blue-eyed and blessed with “Atlantean shoulders” while Hawkins is “ponderous” and has “distorted features.”   I suspect a certain amount of prejudice at play.

“High-Admirals of Piracy” is an illustrated spread about famous historical pirates from Pierre le Grand to Blackbeard.  Sadly uncredited.

“Marauders of the South Seas” by William B. DeNoyer moves into the then-present day, with a diver realizing that his employers were the ones who sunk a ship he’s been hired to salvage–and they have no intention of paying him in money.  “Lucky” Lewis is aided by the fact that one of the criminals has a wife on board who deeply regrets the marriage.  Less suspenseful than it might have been with a couple more twists.

“Jolly Roger’s Log” by Ned Carline, which would become the letter column, has a couple of suspiciously apropos letters with questions Mr. Carline answers.   Again, this is the first issue, so where the letters came from is unclear.

This Adventure House reprint includes the original ads, including advertisements for “the forbidden secrets of sex”, a collected volume of H.G. Wells’ science fiction and the German Iron Horseshoe muscle builder.

Recommended for pirate story fans who don’t mind clear-cut tales of good vs. evil.

TV Review: The Court of Last Resort

TV Review: The Court of Last Resort

In 1948, seven lawyers, including Erle Stanley Gardner, the author of the Perry Mason series, formed a group called “The Court of Last Resort.”  They investigated convictions that seemed to have irregularities, to see if the accused had actually committed the crime, much like the modern “Project Innocence.”

the Court of Last Resort

Mr. Gardner apparently thought some of the cases might make good television, and promote the work of the group, so a television series was made and aired 1957-1958.  While the episodes were based on real cases, names were changed to avoid legal problems.  Actors played the Court during episodes, but sometimes the actual lawyers would appear in a postscript.

I watched four episodes.  “The Clarence Redding Case” involved a drifter accused of “assaulting” and murdering a girl in a barn (Rape is implied, but never mentioned.)  “The Jim Thompson Case” has an ex-con mechanic accused of robbing and murdering a man who was shaving at the time.  “The John Smith Case” is another drifter,  accused of murdering a grocer in a robbery gone wrong.  And “The Mary Morales Case” involves a Mexican-American woman accused of murdering a white woman while trying to kill her own husband.

Of the cases, two suspects are proved innocent, one is proved guilty (the irregularity turned out to be a witness covering their own crime) and one did the crime, but it was manslaughter, not murder.

A common theme is suspicion of police misconduct, as the suspects are disadvantaged people that the legal system is weighted against.  It’s not always true.  Certainly the episodes show what we would now consider shocking lack of proper procedure.

The episodes are fairly staid, but the conclusions tend to be very well done emotionally.   The most affecting was the John Smith Case, when the friendless drifter with no family in the world learns that a small kindness he did 22 years ago has cleared him, and he is a free man.

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