Book Review: The Queen of Zamba

Book Review: The Queen of Zamba by L. Sprague de Camp (Also published as Cosmic Manhunt)

It started out as a normal missing person case.  Victor Hasselborg was hired to find runaway heiress Julnar Batruni.  Her trail is easy to pick up, as she used her own name to buy tickets off-planet with her lover, one Anthony Fallon.  Victor pursues them to the distant world of Krishna, where he runs into a snag.

The Queen of Zamba

It seems that Krishna is under a technological interdict, to prevent the warlike natives from gaining the ability to destroy themselves (and others) before their civilizations advance to more peaceful methods of conflict resolution.  Thus Victor must shed most of his advanced equipment and disguise himself as a native to search for the lovers.  Can a man used to automatic pistols and fast cars survive with a sword and aya-drawn buggy?  And once he does find his targets, will he survive his encounter with the Queen of Zamba?

This story is part of the Viagens Interplanetarias setting, created by Mr. de Camp as a way to use many of the tropes of “planetary romance” in a more plausible way than had previously been the case.  (Edgar Rice Burroughs, the founder of the subgenre with A Princess of Mars, had focused more on the fiction side of “science fiction” and most authors writing in the same vein had stuck with that.)   So the Krishnans, while appearing close enough to Terrans so that they can easily disguise themselves as each other, can make whoopee with humans but not babies.  There’s a reasonable explanation for using swords and riding animals when more technologically advanced items exist.  And our protagonists can’t just zip between worlds–thanks to relativistic effects, voyages that take months for the traveling characters take years for the people left behind.  Even with improved human longevity and safe suspended animation, normal people with settled lives aren’t keen on repeated space travel.

Thus our protagonist, Victor Hasselborg.  In some ways, he’s a typical fictional private eye.  Disappointed in love, recovering alcoholic, tough talker, will kill if he has to.  But he’s also a germ-phobic hypochondriac who is skittish around attractive women who seem a bit too interested, and none too interested in the adventurous life.

There’s also some inventiveness in the general setting–after World War 3, the Soviet Union was gone and the United States crippled to the point it had to merge with Canada to survive.  And Brazil became the world’s leading power, aided by having invented starships.  On the other hand, people still smoke cigars in this 22nd Century, and the number one occupation of Earthwomen is “housewife.”  (A Krishnan woman expresses her desire to become one as the rumors she hears of Earth romanticize the position.)

During the story, Victor runs into treachery and eventually must team up with another Terran in disguise to prevent technological horror from being unleashed on Krishna.

Originally written in the late 1940s, this story was reprinted by Ace Books under the title Cosmic Manhunt and with the ethnicity of one of the characters changed due to politics.  This “Asimov’s Choice” edition restores the original title and character.

To fill out the volume, a longish story entitled “Perpetual Motion” has been added.  Con artist Felix Borel comes to Krishna to fleece the natives with a twist on the technology ban.  He can’t introduce any innovation that is beyond current Krishnan science or technology, but since perpetual motion machines are impossible, they don’t count, right?  Felix is not a good person, though he can twist events to make himself look better–right up until his luck runs out.  This story shares a minor character with the main event.

This is light adventure and fast reading; even with the added plausibility, you shouldn’t think about the science too hard.  Recommended for planetary romance fans.  There are quite a few Viagens Interplanetarias stories; I also recommend Rogue Queen if you can find it.

Book Review: Warrior of Scorpio

Book Review: Warrior of Scorpio by Alan Burt Akers

Scorpio

This is the third in the Prescot of Antares planetary romance series.  For newer readers who might not have seen the term before, a “planetary romance” is a subgenre of science fiction in which an Earthling (or someone of Terran extraction) is transported to and stranded on an Earthlike planet with a savage set of local civilizations.  He (and it’s almost always a “he”) will then proceed to kick butt thanks to his superior Earth musculature and training, kill or ride exotic beasts, and fall in love with a princess (who will eventually return the favor.)   The John Carter of Mars series by Edgar Rice Burroughs is the granddaddy of the subgenre.

In this case, Dray Prescott is an Eighteenth Century sailor plucked from Earth to the planet Kregen, which orbits Antares in what we call the Scorpio constellation.  This is the work of the enigmatic Star Lords who drop him in various situations that they want resolved.  In previous volumes, he became nigh-immortal along with his beloved, Princess Delia, only to be snatched back to Earth.  Once again on Kregan, he led a slave revolt, which was apparently a little too successful.

In this volume, Dray Prescot is snatched from the rebellion, but manages to avoid being sent to Earth, instead being dumped onto an isolated farm just in time to save a woman and child from invading “half-men.”  He also saves enslaved archer Seg Segutorio, who joins Prescot on his journeys.  By good luck, Dray is reunited with Delia, and they decide to go back to her kingdom to finally get hitched.  She has an airship to take them over the dangerous Hostile Territories, but things are never that simple in an adventure story….

Good stuff:  Plenty of fast-moving action–our heroes are in peril on a regular basis from all sorts of weather, beasts and people.  If you like the manly man sort of protagonist, Prescot is certainly that, but is anti-slavery so we know he’s a good guy.

Not so good stuff:  Planetary romance tends to have some racism and sexism problems.  The former is indicated by the word “half-men” (and Prescott often mentions in his narration that he learned better about the various races of Kregen later.)  The sexism comes on stronger, with women being in the story to be rescued by Prescot and/or throw themselves at him.  (This volume does pass the Bechdel test with a very brief conversation about botany before the women turn their attention back to Prescot.)  One notable scene has two women who are not Dray Prescot’s love interest fighting over which one of them should be.

When the subject of rape comes up, a minor character allied to Prescot indulges in victim-blaming, and no one disputes him (he vanishes from the story shortly thereafter, fate unknown.)  And there is a scene that is no question about it headed for tentacle porn before Prescot breaks free and kills the critter.  It’s not nearly as awful with the sexual politics as Gor, but is well below Barsoom.

Other stuff:  The framing device is that Dray Prescott was temporarily on Earth in the 1970s and dictated the story into a set of cassette tapes, some of which have gone missing.  Thus the author can skip ahead through slow bits or areas where he got stuck.

Overall:  Not your best entry into planetary romance; look up the John Carter books.

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