Anime Review: Tiger Mask W

Anime Review: Tiger Mask W

On an alternate Earth where professional wrestling is absolutely real, the world wrestling industry is dominated by the Global Wrestling Monopoly (GWM.)  One of the few independent markets left is Japan.  GWM offers a cross-promotion with the second-biggest wrestling operation in Japan, Zipangu.  But once the matches begin, it’s obvious that the goal is not exciting matches, but for GWM to destroy Zipangu as an organization.

The final blow is the match between GWM’s Yellow Devil and Zipangu’s champion and manager, Daisuke Fujii.  The masked Devil used illegal moves to win the match, and continued to attack even after he’d won, crippling Daisuke for life and scarring Daisuke’s son Takuma.  Without the older man’s leadership, Zipangu fell apart   Takuma Fujii and his best friend Naoto Azuma vow vengeance, but as lowly trainees there is little they can do at the time.

Tiger Mask W

Several years later, GWM returns to Japan to wipe out its largest wrestling operation, New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW.)   Naoto is ready for them.  He found a trainer in Kentaro Takaoka, who was once secretly Yellow Devil himself.  Takaoka reveals that the true power behind GWM is the Tiger’s Den, once feared as a criminal organization that churned out superior wrestling heels, until they were exposed and defeated by their former member Tiger Mask.  Takaoka puts Naoto through a special training regimen to become the new Tiger Mask.

However, he is unaware that Takuma has infiltrated Tiger’s Den to destroy them from within, becoming the fearsome Tiger the Dark!  Who will be the ultimate tiger?

This 38-episode anime series is a sequel to the Tiger Mask manga and anime from the 1970s.  While in many ways it’s a throwback to older styles, with an episodic structure, opening song that’s directly about the show (a remix of the older series’ theme) and clearly drawn lines between good and bad, it’s lighter in tone and outcome than the original.  (Tiger Mask killed off many of the major characters, including the hero!)

Lighter the show may be, but there is still blood in some matches (about as much as you’d see in a real life professional wrestling match which calls for bleeding) and frequent use of wrestling moves that are Do Not Try This At Home.  The series is relatively light on male-oriented fanservice, but there is a hot springs episode, and female wrestlers wearing form-fitting outfits.

Comic relief comes from the clownish masked wrestler Fukuwara Mask (who hides a dark secret) and Haruna, niece of Takaoka and Tiger Mask’s self-appointed business manager.  While she’s certainly got the enthusiasm and some business sense, Haruna is a recent high school graduate and rather naive.  Over the course of the series, Haruna begins to show more competency, and the final episode (after the main plot wraps up in #37) is a spotlight for her coming into her own.

Several of the matches are quite thrilling; the romantic subplots are kind of cliche.

Recommended highly to pro wrestling fans, and those looking for a more kid-friendly anime that isn’t about selling toys.

And here’s the opening theme!  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RF7cwAo0UTI

 

Manga Review: Noragami: Stray God #1

Manga Review: Noragami: Stray God #1 by Adachitoka

Mutsumi is in a bad way.   Not only is she under stress studying for the high school entrance exams, but her classmates have turned against her, bullying Mutsumi and encouraging her to self-harm.  She’s locked herself in a toilet stall for a good cry when suddenly she sees a telephone number in the graffiti advertising someone named “Yato” who promises to solve her problems.  Desperate, Mutsumi calls the number.

Noragami: Stray God #1

To her shock, Yato (who appears to be a teenage boy) and his female companion Tomone teleport straight into the girls’ room to discuss Mutsumi’s problem.  It turns out that Yato is a kami (“spirit” or “god”), but he’s at the very bottom of the hierarchy, with no worshipers or space in a shrine, making him a “stray.”  In an effort to increase his visibility and save up cash to buy a place to live, Yato has scribbled his number all over town, and charges five yen (roughly a nickle) for his problem-solving services.  Tomone is Yato’s shinki, a living weapon with a mind of her own.

Unfortunately, Yato isn’t all that bright, and tends to solve problems by cutting them with his sword.  Mutsumi’s problems are partially caused by an ayakashi (hostile spirit) that is amplifying and feeding on the negative emotions caused by exam stress, and cutting that is relatively easy.  But that isn’t the only issue, and how Yato finally solves it disgusts Tomone so much that she quits, leaving Yato weaponless at the end of the first story.

This series ran in Monthly Shounen Magazine in long chapters, so there are only three in this volume.  In the second story, Yato meets Hiyori Iki, a human girl who is a big pro wrestling fan, and due to an act of selfless courage develops the ability/problem of her soul slipping loose from her body.   In soul form, she’s physically powerful, but also very vulnerable, gaining a “tail” that’s actually a link back to her physical body–if it’s cut, she dies!  The third story ends with Yato gaining a new shinki, Yukine, who is decidedly unimpressed with his master.

The name of the series immediately brings to mind the classic 1930s manga Norakuro, about a stray dog that joins a canine-people version of the Imperial Japanese army, learns discipline and valor, and climbs the enlisted ranks.  Little-known in America, it was popular and influential in Japan, with demilitarized versions appearing after World War Two ended.

Noragami is fun adventure-comedy, contrasting Yato’s blunt and sometimes abrasive personality against Hiyori’s naivety and sunniness.  While both of them are eager to help people, Yato is goal-oriented and must be compensated first (even if it is just a nickle) while Hiyori just does it because it’s the right thing to do.  Yukine barely appears in this volume, so a full read on his character is not available here.  The art is decent and conveys the action and mood nicely.

As mentioned, the first story does involve bullying, and there is an element of victim-blaming.  There’s a small amount of incidental fanservice–thankfully, the “camera” does not linger.  And of course there’s a certain amount of fantasy violence.  It should be suitable for junior high readers on up; parents of younger readers should point out why victim-blaming is not useful.

This series was popular enough to get a two-season anime adapation, which I have not seen.   Recommended for fans of shounen fantasy manga.

Manga Review: Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga Volume 2

Manga Review: Batman: The Jiro Kuwata Batmanga Volume 2 by Jiro Kuwata

To briefly recap:  When the Batman television series was brought to Japan in the 1960s, it was decided to do a manga tie-in using the talents of Jiro Kuwata (creator of 8-Man).  Rather than being based on the TV show directly, Mr. Kuwata was given a bunch of recent issues of the American comics (which were slightly more serious) and based his interpretation on those.  Please see my review of Volume 1.

Batmanga 2

The first story in this second volume is the return of Clayface, a shape-shifting villain who gained his ability from a pool of water in a cave.  The criminal is dismayed to find the cave has been collapsed with explosives, but is eavesdropping when Batman mentions that a scientist took some of the water to analyze it.  He then apparently kills the scientist to get his hands on the transformation fluid and starts a crime wave again.  A great moment is when Batman realizes that the person complaining of toothache is actually Clayface, as the real person wears dentures.

Next is a professional wrestling based story.  Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson witness a match between popular “face” (good guy) wrestler Apache Arrow, and despised “heel” (bad guy) wrestler the Hangman.  Despite the Hangman using illegal moves, he wins the match handily.  Afterwards, Batman and Robin go on patrol.  They spot the Hangman robbing a jewelry store, but before they can catch up, another Hangman appears and defeats the robber!

Turns out that in this continuity, pro wrestling is real, but the Hangman is working an angle anyway.  He and Batman engage in a mask-off match, where the loser has his true face revealed.  Or does he?

The third story (each of these is told in several weekly chapters, by the way) is set at a masquerade carnival that moves from city to city, happening to be in Gotham City this week.  Batman is looking for an escaped convict, which is a trifle more difficult when everyone in the fairgrounds is disguised.  When the Dynamic Duo do catch up with the crook, he’s been murdered.  Some clues are provided by photojournalist and sometime Batman love interest Vicki Vale, the best showing of a female character in the manga.

Next up is “The Mystery of the Outsider.”  In the American comics, this was a plotline that went on for several months as the unseen but insanely powerful Outsider used his uncanny knowledge of Batman and Bruce Wayne to try to kill them.  It’s considerably condensed here, and for the readers there is no mystery.  U.S. readers might be shocked to see Alfred on the phone with Police Chief Gordon, casually mentioning that he’s Batman’s butler.  This is explained later when we learn that in this continuity, Chief Gordon is fully aware of Batman’s double identity.

The storyline loses some of its impact here because this is the first time the person who is secretly the Outsider appears in the manga at all; we’re not as shocked as the original readers would have been.

This volume concludes with a complex tale of a missing scientist, a robbery gang, and the Monster of Gore Bay.  Robin gets to be more of a teenager here, getting overenthused about investigating a sea monster, and dealing with the scientist’s tsundere (ill-tempered on the outside, sweet on the inside) daughter.

The writing is decent enough, remembering that this manga was aimed at elementary school boys, and there are some clever twists.  The art is old-fashioned and looks stiff compared to many modern manga.  Every so often there’s a great splash page where the artist cuts loose.

This volume is primarily for Batman completists, while casual Bat-fans may want to check it out at the library.

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