Manga Review: Oh My Goddess! Volume 27

Manga Review: Oh My Goddess! Volume 27 by Kosuke Fujishima

Keiichi Morisato is an engineering undergraduate at the Nekomi Institute of Technology when his overbearing upperclassmen stick him with watching the all-male dorm over a holiday weekend.  (It’s not like it’s going to interfere with his social life.)  Getting hungry, Keiichi tries to order delivery, but each restaurant he tries is closed.  In a fit of frustration, Keiichi punches random keys on the phone–and is connected to something called the Goddess Help Line.

Oh My Goddess! Volume 27

The voice on the other end says that an operator will be with him shortly, and it turns out they meant physically.  A beautiful goddess named Belldandy (after Verthandi, the Norse Norn of the present) offers a single wish to Keiichi.  Lonely and with no luck with women due to being short, the dumbstruck Keiichi wishes for “a girl just like you to stay with me forever.”

The wish is granted by forcing Belldandy to stay on Earth with our young protagonist.  The returning upperclassmen kick the couple out of the dorm (“all-male” and they mean it) so Keiichi and Belldandy move into an abandoned shrine that Belldandy shines up with her powers.  Not too long after, Belldandy’s sisters Urd and Skuld show up…and never go away.  Our young couple is finding themselves truly falling in love, but will they ever get enough peace and quiet to fulfill it?

This seinen (young men’s) manga series (Aa! Megami-sama in Japanese) ran monthly from 1988 to 2014, a total of 48 volumes!  It’s been immensely popular over the years, spawning a set of OAVs, three anime series (one a gag spin-off), a theatrical movie and a novelization.   The relatively chaste nature of the series (Keiichi and Belldandy seldom do more than hold hands for most of the run) made it a good choice to show new anime fans in the U.S.

This is one of those series that showed marked artistic improvement over the years as Fujishima mastered his craft.  (The animated versions use the later character designs even when covering the early events.)

This is very much male wish-fulfillment.  A beautiful girl falls in love with our outwardly schlubby hero because she’s not fooled by his unimpressive looks and can see the true nobility of his inner nature.  While the course of true love seldom runs smooth, it’s almost always interference coming from outside, and Keiichi seldom has to actually work at building and maintaining the relationship.  Plus, Belldandy is in many ways the positive stereotype of the traditional Japanese housewife, kind, efficient, competent at all things feminine and ready to follow Keiichi’s lead.

Also irritating to some readers is that the main relationship plateaus early on as the creator realized what a cash cow he had and determined to milk it as long as possible.  It’s not until the final volume that Keiichi and Belldandy finally move past “grade-school sweeties who live in the same house”, and then the long stall is turned into a plot point.

All that said, they are cute together and most of the characters are likable.

In the volume to hand, #27, shenanigans have turned a former demon’s familiar partway into an angel.  (Angels are bond creatures to gods as familiars are to demons.)  Without a god or demon to bond to, the new “angel” will die.  Keiichi, being the kindhearted and steadfast fellow he is, has volunteered to host the critter in his body temporarily.  This is killing him as the volume begins.

Keiichi disappears, and the goddesses look for him, only to find him in the most likely place.  Then the crew realizes there’s one being in the neighborhood that could host the bond creature–Velsper, the demon who’s been trapped in the form of a cat to curb his powers, and doesn’t have his own familiar.   There’s a smack of homophobic humor, but all ends well (if embarrassing for Velsper.)

Then Urd, Skuld and Peorth (an unrelated fourth goddess who’s also staying at the temple because reasons) get into a rubber band war that escalates far beyond just flicking office supplies at each other.  Silly and inconsequential.

The volume is rounded out by a story in which we meet the Machiners, one of the many races that share Earth with the humans–at a slight angle.  The Machiners are machine people that come in various sizes and shapes, and sometimes need repairs.  It’s a good thing that Belldandy and Keiichi are good at machine repair, Belldandy due to her supernatural nature, and Keiichi because he loves machines.   This is a “sense of wonder” story that stands well on its own.

There are also a few Mini-Goddesses gag strips, and the first chapter of the novel First End, which posits a scenario in which Keiichi dies.

This series is now being reprinted in omnibus volumes, and those may be easier to find than the older ones.

And here’s a great scene from the movie:

Book Review: Last Hope Island

Book Review: Last Hope Island by Lynne Olson

Disclaimer:  I received this Advance Review Copy as a Goodreads giveaway for the purposes of this review.  No other compensation was requested or offered.   Some changes may be made before the final publication date of 4/25/17–for example, the index isn’t included in this version.

Last Hope Island

This book opens with Movie Night at the German embassy in Norway, April 1940.  The film shown to Norwegian government officials was Baptism of Fire, a documentary about the invasion of Poland in 1939.  Afterwards, the German ambassador made a speech that roughly translates into English as “Nice country you Norwegians have here.  It’d be a shame if anything happened to it.”  Four days later, the Nazis invaded.

Rather than turn over the reins to local fascist Vidkun Quisling as the invaders wanted, King Haakon VII and the remnants of the Norwegian government fought a running battle until they could be evacuated to Britain, where they joined other European governments in exile.  Soon, this “Last Hope Island” and the embattled people sheltered by it were the only thing standing between Nazi Germany and complete victory on the Western Front.

This volume discusses various aspects of the joint efforts of Occupied Europe and the British against the Nazis.  From the early gift of an ULTRA machine by Polish cryptographers so that the British could read German codes, through the contributions of combat-experienced Polish and Czech pilots in the Battle of Britain, the Norwegian gift of its merchant marine, and Resistance fighters of all descriptions, the governments in exile (and General de Gaulle’s Free French) gave invaluable help.   The BBC’s transformation from a stuffed-shirt government branch to a voice of truth and freedom that brought words of encouragement from exiled leaders is detailed.

But all was not beer and skittles.  Pre-War resentments and cultural attitudes often caused misunderstandings and in-fighting.  As it turned out, the British didn’t have the world’s best spy agency, just the world’s best spy novelists, with both MI6 and the Special Operations Executive (who were supposed to be creating and working with Resistance networks) making bungle after bungle.  And once the Soviet Union and the United States entered the war, Britain’s focus shifted to appeasing these powerful allies even when it went against the interests of the occupied countries.  (This culminated in the shameful betrayal of Poland and Czechoslovakia to the Russians.)

After the war, while the formerly occupied countries of Europe were and remained thankful to Britain and its people for all the help given, they also knew that they couldn’t rely on the island nation to protect them.  So new alliances were formed, and greater cooperation established, eventually leading to the creation of the European Union.

Quite a bit of this is material I had not known before, partially because much of my WWII history reading was done in the 1970s, while some of the source documents were still classified, and partially because my sources were USA-centric.  Various people involved get a stronger focus because they survived the war and became famous, such as Audrey Hepburn, who was trapped in occupied Holland.

There are scattered illustrations (possibly more in the finished product), extensive endnotes, a bibliography, and the full book will have an index.  The writing is clear, and this book should be suitable for bright high school students and up.

The benefits of hindsight are very evident throughout (the end material may or may not be updated to reflect Brexit.)  I do recommend this book to those curious about the relationship between Britain and Occupied Europe; however it is at the same time a fairly narrow subject, but covering a multitude of intersecting fields.  I would recommend having to hand a more general WWII history for reference, and checking the bibliography for more specific works on individual people and incidents.   (The author explains in her foreword that Greece and Yugoslavia were completely cut out of the book due to their different circumstances, so readers with an interest in those countries will definitely need to seek out other material.)

Book Review: Skycruiser

Book Review: Skycruiser by Howard M. Brier

Barry Martin is not as young as he looks.  He’s had three years of engineering in college, and two years training as a pilot.  But he looks like a teenager, and a perception that he was too young to handle a man’s job caused him to wash out of the Navy’s pilot program.  Now Barry is trying to get a job at Starwing Airplane Company as a test pilot, but things are not going well.  The owner, Porter J. Hamlin, has banned Barry from his office!  But Barry isn’t licked yet.

Skycruiser

This 1939 boys’ air adventure novel (my copy is a Comet Books reprint from 1948) originally appeared as a serial in Boy’s Life magazine, the house organ of the Boy Scouts of America.  Starwing is pretty transparently a fictional version of Boeing, with a touch of Hughes Aircraft.  Mr. Brier set the story in  the Pacific Northwest, as he did with most of his books, being most comfortable where he lived.

When Barry’s mentor becomes ill, the young man is able to use a contract loophole to demonstrate his test pilot skills to Mr. Hamlin, and seeing Barry in action is enough to overcome the older man’s objections.  Barry is hired  as a junior pilot, but then experiences difficulty winning over the senior pilots.  Not only do they resent the implication that they’re over the hill (a media report on Barry doesn’t help) but the last junior pilot they had turned out to be crooked.

The Skycruiser of the title turns out to be an experimental aircraft Mr. Hamlin wants to build, an enormous passenger plane that will be the equivalent of a luxury liner.   Rival companies would like to steal the plans for the Skycruiser, as it requires several innovative designs just to handle minor functions, let alone get the thing to fly; and if they can’t get that, sabotaging the prototype would work too.  There’s an ever-present threat of industrial espionage.

But there’s plenty of work for Barry even in his regular job, as he tests planes and flies rescue missions.  Barry’s pretty much married to his work–when he isn’t flying airplanes, he’s maintaining them or reading about them, and seems at something of a loss when he has to kill time without access to airplanes.

After a trip to Canada to deliver a cargo plane and demonstrate its features, Barry is approached by a smooth-talking man who offers him a job at double the salary.  This turns out to be crooked pilot Deat Proctor (yes, that’s as phony a name as it sounds).  Barry plays it cagey with Proctor, not promising anything in hopes of discovering what the criminal is up to.  Unfortunately, this convinces Starwing senior pilot Steve Cline that Barry is in cahoots with Proctor, and every step Barry takes to try to prove himself innocent only puts him further under suspicion.

By the end of the book, Barry’s brave and intelligent actions allow the criminals to be captured, and he is now friends with the senior pilots.  (There’s a sequel titled Skyblazer in which Barry has South American adventures.)

The writing is direct and free from frills, and there’s little objectionable subject matter, so this book would be suitable for middle grade readers (with a dictionary for a bit of technical vocabulary) on up.  There’s no romance, but the only women seen are wives and have tiny roles at best.  The primary and recommended audience, though, is boys with an interest in air adventure stories.  There appears to have been a 2007 reprint which should be affordable, but the collector will probably want this heavily illustrated edition.

Comet Books was evidently a short-lived imprint of Pocket Books that issued reprints of popular juvenile fiction, both boys’ and girls’ (one of the volumes listed in the back is the first entry in the Sue Barton, Student Nurse line.)

Overall, this is a well-written boys’ adventure book; a little dated, but well worth looking up.

Book Review: Age of Daredevils

Book Review: Age of Daredevils by Michael Clarkson

This book covers two generations of the William “Red” Hill family of Niagara Falls, Ontario.  They were river men, swimmers, rescue workers, boat handlers–and some of them were driven to perform dangerous stunts.  And around Niagara Falls, the most daring stunt imaginable was to go over the Horseshoe Fall in a barrel.  The Hills, father and sons, were involved in most of the attempts at this feat until the 1950s.

Age if Daredevils

Parts of the story are fascinating; the first survivor of a deliberate attempt to go over the falls was a woman in her sixties, Annie Taylor.  And there’s quite a bit of family drama, particularly in the sibling rivalry of Red’s sons “Junior” and Major.  I found the contrast between the acceptance of ultimate risk and the careful shaving off of every bit of lesser risk that could be managed a fair assessment of the character of a daredevil.

The author is a local newspaper reporter who knew the Hills in his youth and has extensively interviewed several of them over the years.  This means that certain details are covered in great depth (and often repetitively), but others are given short shrift–later attempts to go over the falls alive that didn’t involve the Hill family are summarized in a paragraph or two, despite sounding just as fascinating in their backgrounds.   The book also engages in mind-reading from time to time, reporting what a person who did not survive likely felt during certain events.

There’s an extensive sources section and chapter notes, but no index.  This is more of a memoir than a formal history.  I should note that there is discussion of suicides related to the Niagara River.

Recommended for those who have a fascination with daredevils and especially those who have an interest in the Niagara Falls phenomenon.

Manga Review: Inuyashiki #1-3

Manga Review: Inuyashiki #1-3 by Hiroya Oku

Life is tough for Ichiro Inuyashiki.  He’s only 58, but looks a good ten years older.  His wife and children think he’s a loser (and they’re not entirely wrong,) he gets pushed around by jerks, and now he has cancer.  The prognosis is terminal, a few months at most, and he’s not sure anyone will miss him when he’s gone.

Inuyashiki 1

The only creature on Earth that seems to appreciate him is his Shiba dog Hanako.  And it’s when he’s out walking Hanako in the park that Ichiro’s life takes an unexpected turn.  When he wakes up in the wee hours of the morning, Ichiro has missing time, and his aches seem to have disappeared.  Little things keep adding up, until Mr. Inuyashiki finally realizes he isn’t human any more.

This seems to be the last straw, until Ichiro sees some juvenile delinquents attacking a homeless man, and for the first time in his life, he can step up to help…

The “aliens accidentally kill an Earthling, and rebuild him (or her) with superpowers” plot device is a long-running one, even being parodied in Osamu Tezuka’s A*Tomcat.  The writer is fully aware of this, and references Tezuka’s Astroboy, which A*Tomcat was riffing on.  But it’s mixed with the “dying man finds a new purpose in life” plot from Akira Kurosawa’s classic film Ikiru.

The opening scene is the Inuyashiki family moving into the new home that Ichiro has saved up years to be able to buy–which would be a nice place except that it’s literally overshadowed by newer and bigger houses on either side.  It’s clear that Ichiro didn’t consult anyone else in the family before making the purchase, and the surprise he wanted to impress them with is a huge disappointment.  Still, they could be a teensy more appreciative.

The homeless man later in Volume 1 is almost ridiculously sympathetic.  He’s working again, tomorrow he’ll be able to move into a place with a roof, his ex agreed to take him back, he has everything to live for…so naturally now is when the monstrously cruel tweens decide to attack him for funsies.  Saving him and finding a way to punish the children without using violence against them makes Ichiro feel alive again.  Saving lives makes him feel…human!

Inuyashiki 2

Unfortunately, Ichiro wasn’t the only person in the park that night.  Teenager Hiro Shishigami was also present, and also rebuilt by the aliens with unusual powers.  In Volume 2, he takes center stage for a while, helping one of his friends who’s being bullied–and also murdering an entire family for fun.  Hiro only feels alive when he’s killing, and now he can whenever he wants.  Ichiro tries to confront the boy, but neither of them recognizes the other, and while Hiro is able to escape, his instant-death power doesn’t work on the older man.

In some ways, Hiro is a very typical teenager.  He likes comics, is bad at talking to girls, wants to help his friend, and lets his impulses override his better judgement.  The excessive bloodthirst is much less typical.

Not knowing how to track Hiro down, Ichiro explores various ways his abilities can help others.

Inuyashiki 3

In the third volume, the gigantic Yakuza thug Samejima becomes the main enemy.  A man of enormous appetites, he chooses to kidnap a woman to be his sex slave until his abuses kill her.  Through gumption and quick thinking, she temporarily escapes, but that just makes Samejima angry and willing to kill her boyfriend.  It’s at this point that Ichiro interferes; but even with his new powers, Samejima’s physical prowess may be too much for him to handle.  Plus, of course, making the entire Yakuza his opponents.

The creator’s previous work was Gantz, a long-running SF action series noted for over-the-top violence, gratuitous nudity and disturbing sexual situations.   The first volume of this series might fool you into thinking it’s more sedate, but by the third volume we’re back to things like mass eye-gouging and on-page rape.  Sensitive readers should exercise caution.

One thing this series has that Gantz initially didn’t is a sympathetic viewpoint character.  Mr. Inuyashiki means well from the beginning, even if he doesn’t have the courage or physical skill to back up his convictions.  And while his family does come off as pretty awful people, we can understand some of their feelings about the situation.

On the other hand, the “teens are monsters” thing gets tiresome quickly, and in a way it’s a relief when the adult criminals take center stage.

Recommended to fans of Gantz and those who enjoy well-drawn ultraviolence with gratuitous nudity in their science fiction.

Book Review: Springboard to Tokyo

Book Review: Springboard to Tokyo by Canfield Cook

Squadron Leader Robert “Lucky” Terrell has at last gotten his small group of RAF Stratohawk fighter-bombers to China.   There’s a small problem–the Japanese launched a major offensive while our heroes were enroute, and the airfields they were planning to use have been overrun.  Only one badly damaged base is in Chinese hands.   Bob must use all his tactical expertise to coordinate with the badly outgunned Chinese troops to push the Japanese back enough for the reinforcements to arrive.

Springboard to Tokyo

This is the fifth in the Lucky Terrell Flying Story series, about a Texan pilot who joins up with the Royal Air Force prior to America entering World War Two.  While our hero may be flying for the British, it’s pretty obvious that this book was written for American boys.  Various machines are compared to American models, and most of the squadron he’s leading are also U.S. volunteers.  (His navigator is Scots, and there’s mention of Canadians.)   The story is heavily fictionalized–there were no such things as Stratohawks in WWII, and the military situation in China bears little resemblance to what was actually going on in  1943.

That said, the writing is competent, and the wartime prejudice against the Japanese is kept to a minimum (mostly focusing on the barbaric practices of the Japanese military, which were sadly not fictional.)  Characterization is stock, but this allows the Chinese freedom fighters to come off well.  Our heroes have success after success, though they do lose one of their planes and have its crew captured to rack up the suspense a notch.  Boys ten and up should be able to read this easily, with the usual caveats about reminding them of wartime attitudes.

From references I was able to find, the last two books of the series go into techno-thriller territory by having jet aircraft figure far more heavily into the end of the war than actually happened.

This is an enjoyable enough book, and worth a read if you can find it.  Definitely snap up the set of eight if you can find it intact.

 

Magazine Review: Cosmic Crime Stories July 2012

Magazine Review: Cosmic Crime Stories July 2012 edited by Tyree Campbell

If you want to stand out in the crowded field of speculative fiction, one of the ways is “genre-blending,” taking two different popular genres and splicing them together.  For example, horror and romance to create the vampire love stories so immensely popular in recent times.  This twice-yearly magazine blends science fiction and crime fiction.

Cosmic Crime Stories July 2012

“Suttee” by Tyree Campbell leads this issue off.    (When you’re the editor you can decide what order the stories go in.)  Sweeney is a smuggler whose husband was recently killed.   She’s going on one last run, but what’s her end game?  Much of the story is her verbal sparring with an authority figure who doesn’t understand her motivation.

“The Price of Selfishness” by Robert Collins is set on the frontier of space, as a merchant’s prank results in murder.  Captain Jason Ayers must investigate the matter, and determine what sort of justice the alien perpetrator will face.  The local law enforcement shoves the matter off on him, and then doesn’t like the result.

“Perfect Vengeance” by Kellee Kranendonk takes place in a society where the aged are despised.  Shae was one of the few space captains left over forty; until her crew mutinied, shooting her and stranding her and her younger lover on a supposedly barren planet.  Said planet is not nearly as deserted as it appeared, and the locals’ society has an important difference that allows Shae a kind of revenge.  This story suffered badly from not having the background better explained.

“All Tomorrow’s Suckers: Robert Bloch’s Speculative Crimes” by Daniel R. Robichaud.   This short article looks at some of the Psycho author’s more speculative crime fiction, including the series about Lefty Feep, a not quite successful con artist whose schemes always involved science fiction or fantasy gimmicks.

“The Faithless, the Tentacled and the Light” by Mary E. Lowd concerns Nicole Merison, captain of the Hypercube and a rescue mission the government asks her to undertake.  The mission evokes complex emotions, as the captured person is her ex-friend who got her fired from a dream job.  Turns out Cora misinterpreted an important detail of alien biology/technology, so she may deserve to stay….

“No Good Deed Goes Unpunished” by Wayne Carey stars an attorney named Murph, who is called in to defend his cousin Tom Finnegan from charges he carelessly activated an experimental device that destroyed the space station he was on and killed dozens of people.  Murph isn’t really that good of a lawyer, having only won one case before via applied bribery.  That won’t work here, and it gets worse when he discovers that a) Tom’s employers have bailed on the scientist, leaving him holding the bad, and b) local laws requite the attorney to suffer the same penalty as his client.  The locals still have the death penalty for murder.   The fun is watching Murph dig himself out of this hole and win the case mostly honestly.  It feels good, but remember the title.

“Rarified Air: Big City Policing, Year 3000” by Marilyn K. Martin is a police procedural.  In the overcrowded future, only the wealthy can afford to live in buildings high enough to see the sky.  They’re somewhat insulated from law enforcement by the politics of the day, and when a multiple widow reports that her latest husband has gone missing, the cops must tread lightly.

There are a few house ads for Sam’s Dot Publishing and a couple of illustrations by Denny Marshall which don’t go with specific stories.

The Wayne Carey story is the best of the lot, which are mostly middling good.  This magazine might be worth looking up if you like the intersection of SF and crime.

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