Manga Review: Cells at Work!

Manga Review: Cells at Work! 01 by Akane Shimizu

It’s red blood cell AE 3803’s first day on the job.  She’s just delivered her first package of oxygen to the outer limbs, and is about to take a package of carbon  dioxide back to the lungs.  Unfortunately, she gets caught up in a pneumococcus invasion.  White blood cell U 1146 is on the job with his teammates, but one germ manages to escape into the bloodstream.  The two cells meet up later as RBC gets lost on the way to the lungs, and WBC decides to escort her back due to the current danger.  But they may have fallen into a deadly trap….

Cells at Work! 01

Educational comics are a great way for kids to learn the basics of a subject and be entertained at the same time.  In this Osmosis Jones-like manga, (originally published as Hataraku Saibou) the subject is the cells of the human body.  The various kinds of cells are personified, and we see them at work in various crisis situations.  After the pneumococcus chapter, there are stories about pollen allergies, influenza and scrape wounds.  While RBC and WBC appear in each chapter, different cells also get the spotlight.  Memory cells that remember ancient legends, T-Cells that go from weak “naive” cells to “effector” killer T-cells, and many others.

The educational system for cells appears to be inadequate, as AE 3803 needs to have the functions of cells explained to her as they’re encountered.  U 1146 is a veteran germ fighter who often comes across as scary when he gets the urge to kill.  No clean zap guns for this guy, he stabs intruders to death with a short knife, as do the other white blood cells.

As you might expect, this does mean a lot of blood is spilled, and some parents might feel uncomfortable having their middle-schooler read the series.  We learn nothing about the human these cells are inside in this volume.  Thankfully, there’s no fanservice beyond the female red blood cells wearing shorts.

There are some nice monster designs for the germs, and translation notes in the back.  This series would make a nice gift for the budding biology student, and is a decent read for folks who just want to refresh their memory on the functions of cells.

Book Review: Death of a King: The Real Story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Final Year

Book Review: Death of a King: The Real Story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Final Year by Tavis Smiley with David Ritz

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.  My copy was an advanced reading copy, and the final product (due out September 2014) will have some changes, including a full index.

Death of a King

This book covers the last year of Dr. Martin Luther King’s life, from April 4, 1967 to April 4, 1968.  It focuses strongly on Dr. King’s state of mind and thoughts as the year progresses (based on his own words and the memories of his friends and family), with a few digressions to important past events.  As a way to make it feel more personal, the writers refer to him as “Doc,” the nickname his friends called him.

It was a tumultuous year, and not a high point in Dr. King’s life.  It opens with his speech coming out publicly against the Vietnam War, still a deeply unpopular position at the time.  He also worked to widen his civil rights focus to concentrate on the problem of systemic poverty, which cost him support among his followers who felt he should stick to racial issues.  In addition, he was being challenged by younger black leaders who favored the threat (and actual use if necessary) of violence to get their way.

According to this book, during this time Dr. King struggled with issues of depression, his marital infidelity, ill health and private moments when alcohol caused him to lose control of his temper.  But the dark night of the soul was not his only concern, and it talks of his preaching, of his willingness to reach out to his critics and enemies to learn their viewpoints, and of his desire to serve.

Towards the end of the book, it creates a refrain with the end of each chapter leading towards Memphis.  That city’s callous attitude towards its sanitation workers, which had led to the entirely preventable death of two of them, had become intolerable, and led to a strike.   Dr. King was there to elevate the strike into the national spotlight, and to help bring the city to the negotiating table.  But instead, he was assassinated.

This is by no means a complete biography, nor is it meant to be.  Younger readers, or those reading about Dr. King for the first time, will want to read a more general biography first.  That said, the book strongly evokes a particular time in American history, and an important figure in that history.  Snippets of favorite songs and Dr. King’s famous speeches set the tone.

The writing style is intimate, but easy to follow, and moves along quickly.

Recommended to those who want to know more about Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the late 1960s, and the Civil Rights movement.  Parents should be aware that due to its subject matter, some racist language is used in quotes.

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