Book Review: The Tuesday Club Murders

Book Review: The Tuesday Club Murders by Agatha Christie

Author Raymond West has what he thinks is a smashing idea.  A series of Tuesday night gatherings where the six people present discuss mysteries they’ve run across, particularly juicy murders.  In addition to himself, there’s an artist, a lawyer, a clergyman, a retired Scotland Yard commissioner, oh, and his Aunt Jane.  She’s a darling maiden aunt who has seldom left her home village, and is obsessed with knitting, but she might have an insight or two.  But he needn’t have worried about her falling behind, for Miss Marple knows a thing or two about human nature.

The Tuesday Club Murders

Agatha Christie’s beloved elderly lady of detection first appeared in these short stories beginning in 1927.  The collection of them in a book (originally titled The Thirteen Problems) didn’t happen until 1932, so The Murder at the Vicarage (1930) is the first Miss Marple book.  The format of the first six stories is the Tuesday night meetings, beginning with “The Tuesday Night Club” and ending with “The Thumb Mark of St. Peter.”  Then Sir Henry Clithering, the retired Scotland Yard man, gets Miss Marple invited to a dinner party where six more mysteries are told, from “The Blue Geranium” to “The Affair at the Bungalow.”

The last story, “Death by Drowning” has  Miss Marple ask Sir Henry to look into a young woman’s apparent suicide–she’s figured out what actually happened, but has no proof.

Miss Marple’s primary method is finding analogies.  Although she has seldom left her largish village of St. Mary Mead, Aunt Jane has had a long life and a keen interest in the people around her (and an ear for gossip.)  Thus she can almost always find something in her past that is reminiscent of the case at hand, and gives her the clues she needs.

Despite the title, not all of the stories involve a murder; “Ingots of Gold” for example is about a robbery.  Some of the tales may be more difficult for a reader to unravel due to them becoming dated; one relies on older British slang, while another requires a knowledge of obsolete work practices.   On the other hand, one of the tales has a trick ending of the type that made Ms. Christie’s work famous.  There’s some period sexism and classism, and one story involves domestic abuse.

While not Agatha Christie’s best work, and Miss Marple would have some character development in later books, (she’s kind of smug here) these are fun short mysteries that are very much of a time and place.

Book Review: Rad Women Worldwide

Book Review: Rad Women Worldwide by Kate Schatz

Right up front, I have to say that the title is the most annoying thing about this book.   Did anyone ever use “rad” as an adjective unironically?  That said, “radical” is not an unfair term to apply to many of the women whose short biographies are written in this volume.  There are forty stories set around 30 “countries”, starting with Enheduanna of Mesopotamia, the first named author that we have records of, and wrapping around the globe to Emma Goldman, born in Russia, anarchist and advocate for worker’s rights.

Rad Women Worldwide

This is a sequel to Rad American Women A-Z by the same creators; the greater scope allows them to have more variety.  There are scientists, athletes and entertainers, politicians and even a princess!  The book is written for middle-grade girls, but some of the subject matter may be difficult for more sensitive readers.  (A couple of these biographies moved me to tears.)  Many of the women covered I had heard of before, but a few were new to me.

The papercut illustrations by Miriam Klein Stahl give the book a distinctive, rough-hewn look; it also ties the appearance of the volume together better than a mix of photographs and paintings might have, as there are both historical and contemporary women covered.

This book also wears its politics on its sleeve, obvious in the selection of women to write about.  Politically conservative parents might find it uncomfortable that Kasha Jacqueline Nagabasera (fights for gay rights in Uganda) and Buffy Sainte-Marie (anti-war activist) get full entries while such right-wing icons as Margaret Thatcher and Mother Teresa don’t even make the 250 honorable mentions in the back.  The poem about “the stateless”, refugees, exiles and others torn from their homelands includes the line “No human being is illegal.”

As is common in collections of short biographies, only the highlights of any given woman’s life are included, and edited according to the author’s intent.  Many of these women were controversial during their lifetimes, and some of them are still controversial now.  A reader who takes a particular interest in one of the subjects would be well advised to seek out more complete biographies.  I’ve previously reviewed biographies of King Hatshepsut http://www.skjam.com/2016/01/20/book-review-the-woman-who-would-be-king-hatshepsuts-rise-to-power-in-ancient-egypt/ and Queen Lili’uokalani http://www.skjam.com/2014/02/21/book-review-lost-kingdom-hawaiis-last-queen-the-sugar-kings-and-americas-first-imperial-adventure/ , for example.

I expect that this book will end up in  a lot of elementary school libraries.  I’d also recommend this volume to parents of middle-grade kids (yes, boys too, to go with their many books about famous men) with the caveat (or bonus!) that you might want to sit down with them to discuss some of the topics that will come up.

Disclaimer:  I received a copy of this book from Blogging for Books for the purpose of writing this review.  No other compensation was offered or requested.

Magazine Review: High Adventure #144 Captain Battle

Magazine Review: High Adventure #144 Captain Battle edited by John P. Gunnison

This issue of the pulp reprint magazine has two stories by renowned adventure writer H. Bedford-Jones, both from the pages of People’s.  People’s was a Street & Smith publication that ran from 1906 to 1924 under varying titles, all of which had “People’s” in them.  It appears to have been a generic adventure story magazine, and notable for covers that were more picturesque than lurid, unlike many of the later pulps.

High Adventure #144: Captain Battle

“Captain Battle” has a main character whose name is both more and less unlikely at the same time.  His birth name is Captain Cathenach, the family one being an old Gaelic term for “battle.”  He’s investigating rum-running and other criminal activity in the Pacific Northwest towards the end of World War One.  The main villain of the story is “Yellow” Hearne, a criminal mastermind who has decided to get out of the rum-running business just as Prohibition is making it really profitable as he has even bigger plans.

What brings these men into direct conflict is that they both have an acquaintance with wealthy businessman Philip Nichols…and his beautiful daughter Faith.  Hearne wants to marry Faith, by hook or by crook, but would prefer she do it voluntarily, and as long as the manly Captain is around, that’s too much competition.   Hearne uses the implication that he is a government agent several times in the story to get his way.

Captain Cathenach is also in love with Faith, but has a number of secrets that get in the way.  First, he is actually a government agent undercover as a wealthy eccentric.  Second, under another name, he’s wanted for jewel robbery and murder.  Those he could probably clear up for Faith, but his third secret, the one that keeps him from revealing his true feelings to the maiden, is that he’s going blind!

There are a number of twists and turns, including a mid-story shocker when Cathenach gets a head wound and becomes a simple-minded amnesiac.

There’s some period racism in the story, with Cathenach being of the “my best friend is Chinese” type.  Sexism is more of the setting related type; Faith is plucky, but not expected to fend for herself in dangerous situations.

“John  Solomon-Retired” is another long story, this one featuring recurring character John Solomon, a Cockney ship’s chandler (a dealer in ship supplies and equipment.)   The hero of the story is Ralph Carter, an American salesman who finds himself at loose ends in Java.  Mr. Solomon  enlists Ralph in a favor the older man is doing a Chinese secret society.

It seems that Miss Wilhemina Bergen owns a spice plantation that hasn’t been able to sell its crop due to the Great War sapping trade.   Herman Stoppel, a “half-caste” (mixed race) trader, has been trying to gain control of the plantation for some reason as yet unknown.  Wing Fu, the secret society representative, went to college with Miss Bergen’s late brother, and has determined that Captain Stoppel thinks he can make two million American dollars from something on the plantation.  It’s unlikely to be the nutmeg, even if the American market is in dire need.

Mr. Carter is sent to the plantation to pretend to be a rival potential buyer, to see if he can figure out what’s going on and protect Miss Bergen’s interests.

Once again there are many twists to the story, with much of the later action taking place on John Solomon’s tricked-out ship, and then on Stoppel’s own craft.  There’s a series of plans and reversals until the final paragraphs.

Again, some period racism, though meaner to the mixed race people than to the Chinese person.  Miss Bergen has competence in her background, she’s been running the plantation for the last two years since her brother died, but has no action skills.  Stoppel turns out to want to marry Miss Bergen–and not to gain the money, either!  She is pretty racist in her response to that.

Both are exciting adventure stories with plenty of action and a bit of romance (somewhat more believable in the first story as the characters have known each other for some years.)   They are, however, products of their time and this may not appeal to some readers.

 

Book Review: The Cavaliers of Death

Book Review: The Cavaliers of Death by Rosita Forbes

Lois Gilmour is a pretty nineteen-year-old and ready to be a bit independent, so she is less than thrilled when her father Charles, a wealthy importer, has arranged her marriage to middle-aged Philip Wingate, a man with a sinister reputation.   It’s especially irksome, as the year is 1930, not 1830.  Time to blow off some steam at a masked ball.

Rosita Flores
My copy has long since lost its dust jacket, and I can’t find a good picture of it, so here’s a photograph of the author.

At the ball, Lois meets a mysterious grey-eyed man in concealing robes, who promises that she will never marry Wingate, and may be a member of the “Cavaliers of Death” who operate in Syria.  He may also be responsible for a murder at the party of a man no one claims to recognize.

Soon, Lois is enmeshed in the clashing schemes of Jim Rattiker (the grey-eyed man), Wingate, the Cavaliers, a devil-worshipping cult, and the true mastermind behind all the events.

Ms. Forbes was a travel writer who specialized in the Middle East, and there are some vivid passages of description once the action in this romantic adventure reaches Syria.

There’s also plenty of action, and a guest appearance by the last of the Romanovs.  Naturally, Lois and Jim quickly fall in love, but his vow of celibacy and secretive nature keep them apart for most of the story.

Lois is a damsel in distress, somewhat improved by being the viewpoint character, but a little too prone to running directly towards danger rather than away from it due to her innocence.   She’s often frustrated with the men in her life refusing to explain what’s going on, even when it directly affects her.  (Most of them do so in an effort to “protect” her, yes, even the antagonists.)  Especially the last third of the book’s danger to Lois could have been avoided if anyone had been straight with her earlier.

The biggest fault of the book to a modern reader is its outright libel of the Yazidi people, who have never had the habit of sacrificing white women to the Peacock Angel every full moon.

There are some fun twists, but a major character dies off-stage in an anticlimatic fashion, and the suspense must be made up in other ways.

Still, if you like romantic adventure and can look past the horribly untrue depiction of minority people, this is a rarity to seek out.

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