Book Review: My Ultimate Super Hero Manual

Book Review: My Ultimate Super Hero Manual by Steve Behling

Almost every comic book-loving kid has gone through a phase when they seriously wanted to be a superhero.  Wearing a flashy costume, having neat powers, hanging out with people like Spider-Man and Storm; what’s not to love?   At the very least, designing your own super hero character can be a blast.  And this book is meant to help you do just that!

My Ultimate Super Hero Manual

It’s a children’s activity book from the folks who bring you Marvel Comics.  There are pencil and paper exercises, but also ways to make homebrew “superpowers” and costumes.  (Be sure to ask your parents’ permission.  If you are an orphan, you’re already halfway down the road to being a superhero, but ask your guardian’s permission anyway.)  There’s even special dice you can put together to play games.

There’s a plethora of Marvel superheros and villains shown or mentioned–some jokes will only be gotten by long-time fans, but most of the humor is accessible by kids.  (There’s even an index for us scholarly types!)  New art is by Juan Ortiz, while other pieces are reprinted from classic Marvel comics and not individually credited.  (Thanks, “work for hire” contracts!)   Marvel’s female heroes are under-represented.

As a long-time Marvel Comics fan, I have a soft spot for books like this.  At a guess, I’d recommend it to kids from 4th to 6th grade, maybe younger under close supervision, plus old-timers like me who will get all the obscure references.   And the physical copy is recommended far more than the Kindle version–have you ever tried drawing in a Kindle file?

Book Review: Strangers of Different Ink

Book Review: Strangers of Different Ink edited by Richard & Allen Okewole

Disclaimer:  I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.

Strangers of Different Ink

This anthology of short stories appears to be primarily by authors in the Philadelphia area.  Other than that, there doesn’t seem to be a particular theme, and their genres vary widely.  The introduction by Tony Tokunbo Fernandez is a short modern poem.  I’m afraid I don’t get modern poetry.

  • “A Lot Can Happen in 26 Minutes” by Dennis Finocchiaro.  A college student counts smiles on a train.  The count is zero, until–a sweet story.
  • “Zadie” by Eric McKinley.  A young man discovers the true love of his life, which is not the title character, or the girl he thought it might be.  A turning point in life.
  • “Capeless City” by Roman Columbo.  The city of Philadelphia has no superheroes, and they’d like to keep it that way.  Unfortunately for Super Powers Investigator Dashiell “Dash” Cain, he may not be able to deliver on that.  This is the story that intrigued me enough to request the book.
  • “Historical Fiction of the Marquis DeSade and Rose Keller” by Cathy T. Colborn.   I’m not sure of the historical nature of Rose Keller.  A feisty young woman of Irish descent is intrigued by the writing  and mystique of the infamous Marquis, and accepts his invitation to visit him.  There’s a difference between romantic fantasy and the reality of relationships with a cruel man, though.  No onscreen sex.
  • “Icky” by Bruce Franchi.   A high school boy whose father is career military witnesses the disintegration of his parents’ marriage and his mother’s death.  There’s a sudden twist at the end which makes this story seem more like the first chapter or two in a young adult fantasy book.  As a result, it’s not quite satisfying.
  • “The Run” by Peter Baroth.   A law school student is pressured into taking some acquaintances to buy drugs.  It doesn’t turn out quite as planned, but is the outcome worse or better?
  • “The Death of St. Clare” by Jordan Blum.  This is an Uncle Tom’s Cabin fanfic, covering an incident that happened off-stage in the original book.  Augustine St. Clare was a relatively “good” slave-owner who had resolved to free Tom, but is killed in a tavern brawl, which leads to Tom being sold to Simon Legree.  It’s an interesting study of St. Clare’s character, and how slavery warped people’s thinking.   Period racism makes this an uncomfortable read.
  • “The Generous Bastard” by Solomon Babber.  A contrast of two couples, one long-married, the other just starting out in their relationship.  Based on a true story.
  • “The Barber of Suez” by K. Fred Mills Jr.  A mixed-race young man goes for his first barber visit (his father had cut his hair before that) and discovers a different part of his heritage.
  • “Choc” by Yohan Simpson.  A story based on true events.  Two children meet in Mumbai, with tragic consequences for both.  Trigger warnings for rape, physical and verbal abuse.  A grim ending for the book.

The stories that worked best for me were “Capeless City”, “The Death of St. Clare” and “Choc.”   “Icky” is probably the weakest story because it is so obviously meant as a first chapter, rather than a story in itself.  There’s a few typos, particularly in “Choc.”

This collection is probably of most interest to Philadelphia area readers, but when was the last time you read Uncle Tom’s Cabin fanfic?

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