Magazine Review: If May 1961

Magazine Review: If May 1961 managing editor Frederik Pohl

If was a science fiction magazine that ran from 1952 to 1974.  It was considered a “second tier” magazine due to frequently low sales, but that should not be confused with “second-rate.”  By 1961, If had become a sister magazine to Galaxy, publishing in alternate months.  Under editor Frederik Pohl, this magazine tended to publish newer writers and more experimental stories, while Galaxy on average worked more with popular established authors.  The cover for the May 1961 issue is “The Commuters” by Jack Gaughan, which has nothing to do with any of the stories.

If May 1961

The lead story is “That’s How It Goes” by J.T. McIntosh.  An overpopulated Earth needs millions of colonists for new worlds.  But it’s only hundred thousands who volunteer.  So most colonists are those who’ve broken laws or rules.  Serious criminals are sent to hellholes like Roc, which is almost certain death.  But for relatively pleasant worlds like Aperdui, which just needs a lot of hard work, any rulebreaker will do.

Thus the seven candidates in the colony office are an actress who wore a see-through nightie on screen, two gluttons, a man who made too many shoes for his quota, a fellow who took a call from his girlfriend and let a food vat die, his girlfriend and the phone operator who let the call go through.  The operator gets a temporary stay, but the rest are shipped off to the new planet to start a farm.

One of the gluttons kills himself because he can’t face life on just enough food to work, and is replaced by an experienced farmer.  We follow the fortunes of the group through their ups and downs, some succeeding and making Aperdui a decent place to live, others dealing with heartbreak.

At the end, one of the colonists becomes a recruiter back on Earth, facing the same sort of involuntary exportees he once was. There’s a picture of a woman skinny-dipping in the distance, her back turned towards the “camera.”  Notably absent from the story is the notion that Earth should perhaps limit its population by other means than emigration.

“Out of Mind” by William W. Stuart concerns a control freak bureaucrat who takes a “vacation” on a planet where the natives have illusion powers that make the place seem ideal, whatever that means to the individual viewer.  Many visitors never leave.  But Screed is ready with anti-illusion pills and a satellite that will disrupt the natives’ powers.  He’ll soon have them whipped into shape as a proper member of the galactic civilization!

Much of the story is Screed being set up to think it’s his idea to go to the planet.  It’s pretty clear his wife (who he allots fifteen minutes of scheduled sex a week) is in on the scam.  It’s a well-deserved fate, but the ending is telegraphed.

“A Science Faction Story” by Theodore Sturgeon is an article on making money from going to space.  Specifically, the then-new idea of communications satellites, a business opportunity that can only be achieved through spaceflight, as opposed to being (Earth activity) in SPACE!

“The Connoisseur” by Frank Banta is set on a generation ship that has forgotten its past, and its goal.  A collector of rare items barters for a child bride with such things as the control knobs which used to be on the navigation panel…before the ship inhabitants killed the last navigator.  No happy ending here, kids.

“Seven Doors to Education” by Fred Saberhagen is an interesting piece about a  swimmer who finds himself undergoing a series of tests to unlock doors to escape wherever it is he’s trapped.  Pete Kelsey’s family didn’t believe in education, and he’s wound up with a steady but dead-end job sorting letters in the Chicago post office.  Now he has to learn, and learn fast if he wants to avoid drowning.  A bit of an infodump at the end, but Pete is faced with a decision that feels meaningful.

“The Useless Bugbreeders” by James Stamers has some interesting features.  The narrator is an advocate for alien species who don’t want the expansionist Earthlings to destroy their homes for the ease of space travel.   He must defend them to a panel of judges who are none too thrilled considering the wacky things that happen.

In this case, his clients are the Bugbreeders, who are masters of creating specialty microbes.  He’s brought along one of their scientists to perform some demonstrations.  Unfortunately, poor prior planning causes each of the demonstrations to have predictable bad consequences.  It looks like the Bugbreeders may lose their asteroid home, but there’s one last twist.  This is one of those stories where the advocate and the client should have gone over the testimony in advance.

“Science Briefs” is a set of short science fact developments as of 1961, including a look at radiation therapy to treat cancer.  Fascinating stuff for science fans!

“Cinderella Story” by Allen Kim Lang concerns Orison McCall, a Treasury agent infiltrating a bank where weird things are going on by being hired as a secretary.  Such things as most of the bank’s employees wearing earmuffs in mid-summer and the invertebrate farm upstairs.

Eventually, Orison learns that she’s stumbled onto an alien power struggle.  The story is marred by most of the male characters treating Orison as a romantic target (and the other major female character assuming Orison is her romantic rival on the strength of Orison being pretty.)  This is especially irksome with the male lead Dink Gerding, who very specifically will not accept that “no” means “no”, orders for his date at restaurants, and jumps straight from first date to marriage proposal.  Naturally, Orison is deeply in love with him by the end of the story.

“The Flying Tuskers of K’Niik-K’naak” by Jack Sharkey rounds out the issue.  It’s a comedic tale about a pompous Great White Hunter being outfoxed by his native servant…in SPACE.  It’s overdone, the narration pushing the hunter character well beyond pompous into actively abusive.

The Saberhagen story is the best in this issue, but the McIntosh story is also pretty good.  You can find all the issues of If on the Internet Archive.

 

 

Manga Review: Nichijou: My Ordinary Life (1)

Manga Review: Nichijou: My Ordinary Life (1) by Keiichi Arawa

The ordinary lives that all of us lead every day might perhaps be a succession of miracles.

This is the story of four ordinary high school girls living their ordinary everyday lives.  Yukko, cheerful but not very bright; Mio, who’s of average intellect and has an artistic streak; the quiet and book-smart Mai; and Nano, who’s a robot with a wind-up key in her back.  They all have their little quirks, and strange things happen often, but it’s all a part of ordinary life.

Nichijou: My Ordinary Life (1)

Nichijou (“Everyday”) is a shounen (boy’s) comedy manga that ran from 2006-2015, with an anime adaptation in 2011.  There isn’t much of a narrative arc; most of the stories depict short scenes from the lives of one or more characters’ daily lives…strange as those events may be.  There are some recurring themes, the most frequent of which is Nano’s desire to blend in with humans, and her frustration with her inventor/ward, eight year old mad scientist Professor Shinonome, who refuses to remove the key in  her back.

In this first volume, we are introduced to the main characters as they head to school in the morning (Nano doesn’t quite make it.)  Yukko tries to figure out why Mai is ignoring her.  Nano has difficulties with new functions the Professor installed in her body.  The pretentious Sasahara (drama club president) and hot-tempered Misato (kendo club member) try to decide what to do for the cultural festival.

There’s a school assembly led by Principal Shinonome (who may or may not be related), known for his “dad jokes” and the intensely shy Ms. Sakurai.   Yukko witnesses a wrestling match between the principal and a deer–and can never tell anyone.  Yukko and Mai play rock-paper-scissors.  Yukko and Mio build a card house (this is a silent chapter.)  Yukko fails to study for finals, and the questions seem indecipherable.

Yukko tries to finish her lunch despite dropping a key ingredient.  Nano and the Professor have cake.  Ms. Sakurai tries to enforce school rules on Sasahara.   Mio belatedly remembers she drew an embarrassing picture in her notebook when Yukko tries to borrow it.  Mio gets a part-time job that sucks.  Yukko finally did her homework on time, but didn’t remember to bring it back to school.  Nano suffers from over the top comedic reactions due to the Professor’s latest modifications.

The short pieces are usually funny, though some of them rely on Japanese conventions of comedy that might be opaque to newer readers of manga.  The lack of focus and chapters where nothing much happens might also make this less appealing to some readers.  Also, there’s some slapstick violence.

I especially like the card house chapter, which utilizes suspense and the previously established characterization to build to a silly conclusion.

The art in this first volume is less than stellar, and suffers greatly from “same face”–the artist improved greatly over the course of the series.

A word or two more about the anime:  It does not present the sketches in the same order, allowing it to have a plot arc where Nano has to convince the Professor to let her attend school.  It also has interspersed gags from the creator’s other series Helvetica Standard, and in the second half of the season, the closing credits feature a different song each time.

I recommend this series for fans of sketch comedy and magical realism.

And now, a music video based on scenes from the anime:

Book Review: What Color Is Your Parachute? 2016

Book Review: What Color Is Your Parachute? 2016 by Richard N. Bolles

As long-time readers of my blog may know, I started this web log of reviews partially to help me find work.  I do not know how much it’s helped, but it’s certainly kept me busy!  My current work assignment is probably ending at the end of October, so this is a good time to start working on my next job search.

What Color Is Your Parachute? 2016

And what better way to start that preparation than by reading a book?  In this case, I have to hand the latest volume from Richard Bolles’ series of job hunting manuals, now in its fortieth year.  It opens on two chapters on what’s new in the job search environment, with the still sluggish economy and the ever-increasing importance of the internet.  You may want to fix your Google search results even before writing your physical resume!

This is followed by a chapter on what remains the same about trying to find open positions.  One of the biggest takeaways here is that most job seekers want to use the methods that require the least time spent–it’s exhausting looking for work!  But most employers want to use the hiring methods that reduce their risk of wasting money on a bad choice, which tend to cost the job seeker the maximum investment of time and effort.  (Especially if you are terrible at making new friends and connections.)

There are chapters on interviewing and salary negotiation (first person to name a specific figure “loses.”)  This is followed by a chapter on things to try when nothing else has worked.  Which brings us to the heart of Mr. Bolles’ job hunting advice.  By carefully examining who you are and what you really want to do, you can narrow down your search to jobs that are best fitted for you, and thus you are likelier to be hired for.  He’s got some very specific methods for the reader to try.   This technique, I am told, is quite successful and one of the reasons this book has stayed in print so long.

And if you can’t find anyone hiring in the exciting new job field you’ve decided to try, there’s a chapter on starting your own business.

Then come the “Blue Pages”, the appendixes.  The first is on finding your “mission” in life, written from a Christian perspective (after all, Mr. Bolles was an Episcopalian priest for fifty years.)   Those who find God-talk distressing may want to skip this chapter.

This is followed by an essay on ways to deal with the negative emotions and feelings often caused by unemployment.  There’s a bit of religion in here, too, but it’s easily skipped over if you prefer, and much helpful secular advice.

The next two appendixes go together, an essay on career coaches, and a listing of some of them around the world.  Mr. Bolles is firm in pointing out that being listed here is not an endorsement, merely a notice that these coaches have put themselves forward to be noticed.  If you’re going overseas, you might also want to look at the appendix of foreign editions specific to various countries.

There’s some material from and about the author, and a form to send in if you have any suggestions for the 2017 edition.  We finish with an index, and listing of related books by Mr. Bolles if this wasn’t enough for you.

It’s an attractively designed book, with a decent number of illustrations (I especially like the cartoon of the fellow who has no parachute of any color.)  The writing is clear and comprehensible, obviously polished over the many editions of the book.

It’s worth noting that many job hunting programs have taken cues from this series, so if you’ve been looking for work for a while, much of this will sound very familiar.  And some people may find the tone a little too much on the positive side for comfort.  There are very few examples of long-term failure in here!

Highly recommended to people looking for work, people who want a career change, people who suspect they may be looking for work soon, and college students about to enter the adult job market.  (There’s a separate book aimed at teenagers.)

Disclaimer: I received this book from Blogging for Books in the expectation that I would read it and write a review.  No other compensation was involved.

 

 

Book Review: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Book Review: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner

Economics can be a deadly dull subject, at least when dominated by stuffed shirts talking about trade deficits, returns on annuities or fiat currency.  But the basics of economic theory can be used to learn useful or amusing things about the world.  With a large enough set of valid data, you can tease out fascinating conclusions, such as the answer to the question “is there cheating in professional sumo wrestling?”  (Probably, or some really amazing and highly consistent coincidences.)

Freakonomics

This book, as the front cover, back cover and several pages at the front remind us, was a New York Times bestseller and all-round phenomenon back in 2005.  (I wonder if there’s some sort of data available on whether having eleven pages of praise for the book before you even get to the title page is a good investment; I skipped right over it.)  It talks about such concepts as positive and negative incentives, regression analysis and information inequality as they relate to cheating schoolteachers, crime rates, baby names and other offbeat subjects.

Perhaps the most controversial subject covered is the notion that legalized abortion led to a massive drop in crime rates in the United States.  The evidence seems sound, but as the authors remind us, the data only shows us what is there, not what should be there.  The same results might have been achievable by other, less painful means.

There are some major changes to this edition of Freakonomics; the chapter  with the story of how the Klu Klux Klan was beaten back had to be heavily revised when one of the sources was revealed to have been exaggerating his role.  There are also several newspaper articles covering subjects that only got a passing mention in the main text, plus the one that got Mr. Dubner interested in covering Mr. Levitt’s research in the first place.  The advertised “Author Q & A” is rather flippant, and more of an advertisement for their next book, Super Freakonomics.

As a semi-scholarly book, there are footnotes, and an index, as well as a list of baby names you might want to consider.

I found this an interesting book with some thought-provoking insights, though some of the conclusions seem a bit iffy.  Recommended to just about everyone, but especially those who’d like to know more about the less stuffy side of economics.

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