Magazine Review: Lapham’s Quarterly: Spring 2015 Swindle & Fraud

Magazine Review: Lapham’s Quarterly: Spring 2015 Swindle & Fraud Edited by Lewis H. Lapham

Mr. Lapham’s literary magazine is based on the principle that history has much to teach the present on many subjects, so presents excerpts from many famous (and not so famous) authors on a loose topic for the education and entertainment of its readers.  This issue covers swindle & fraud, and the topic of lying and stealing more generally.

Lapham;s Quarterly Spring 2015

The pieces are all short, none more than six pages, and most hanging around the two-three page mark.  A long time spectrum is covered, from the classic Trojan Horse gag to the sub-prime mortgage bubble of the 2000s.   After a lengthy editor’s introduction, we start with Lawrence Osborne buying his own death certificate.  Through many authors we proceed to Oscar Wilde’s short play “The Decay of Lying.”Along the way we hear from Charles Ponzi (his original scheme was legal, but he couldn’t raise money for it without resorting to fraud) and Malcolm X’s thoughts on how white politicians lie to black people to get their votes.

There are a few original essays to round out the issue, “Rogue Wounds” by Daniel Mason, on faking illness; “We Buy Broken Gold” by Clancy Martin , on the retail buying of precious metals and gems; and “A Fish Tale” by David Samuels, about Herman Melville and the nature of fiction in Moby Dick.

The issue is profusely illustrated with classic artworks and other depictions of the theme, infographics and short quotes.   Everything is properly attributed, or at least it appears to be.

The general selection of items is high quality, and since they’re short, if a particular piece doesn’t interest you, another one will be along quickly.  It helps that crime and corruption are such interesting topics.  The shortness does however mean that most of the topics are only touched upon in the briefest of terms and you will want to investigate further if a given one interests you.

Highly recommended for strong readers who have limited time at any sitting.

Comic Book Review: Whiteout / Whiteout: Melt

Comic Book Review: Whiteout/Whiteout: Melt written by Greg Rucka, illustrated by Steve Lieber

Carrie Stetko is a U.S. Marshal who’s been reassigned to Antarctica after an…incident at work and the death of her husband.  It’s been a fairly quiet duty post, and Marshal Stetko is getting to feel at home on the Ice.  Then a drilling expedition disappears, leaving only a badly mangled, nearly unidentifiable corpse at the site.

Whiteout

There is murder afoot, and soon Carrie is fighting for her life, not without losses.  She’s no longer sure who she can trust, especially British investigator Lily Sharpe, who most assuredly has her own agenda.  Worse, the investigation must be completed before the mass evacuation of personnel as winter approaches

Melt is a sequel.  Marshal Stetko is called back to the Antarctic from her first vacation in years when a Russian science station explodes.  Certain government agencies want to know if there was anything…against treaty…going on at the station.  Carrie quickly learns the explosion was no accident, and must team up with Russian agent Captain Aleksandr Ivanovich Kuchin.  It seems there might have been something illegal at the station after all, and Carrie must decide between her priorities.

Melt

Assuming the Ice lets anyone survive the chase.

These thrillers are written by Greg Rucka, who is known for his research and attention to detail,   The first volume is a bit more of a mystery than the latter, which is much more about survival.  Art is by Steve Lieber, who took the challenge of a black and white series where white is the dominant color, and used a variety of inking tools to great effect.

This is exciting stuff.  Antarctica is one of the most hostile places on Earth even in good weather.  Add bad weather and human murderousness, and Carrie is fighting for her life most of the time.

The first volume has an attempted rape, and several closeups of Marshal Stetko’s mangled hand.  Melt has some nudity and a (non-explicit, consensual) sex scene.  Both volumes have some harsh language.  As such, parents should heed the “Older Audiences” rating Oni Press has given the books.

There was a Whiteout movie made which takes much of its plot from the first volume.  Marshal Stetko was prettied up quite a bit, Lily Sharpe was replaced by a more conventional male investigative partner, and Carrie’s competence level was lowered somewhat to allow the male heroic characters more to do.  This is believed to have contributed to a relatively poor critical reception.

I recommend this series for thriller fans, lovers of ice and snow, and people who saw the movie.

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