Anime Review: Devilman Crybaby

Anime Review: Devilman Crybaby

War, pollution, crime, climate change, general immorality–it sure seems like the world is going to Hell these days.  According to Ryo Asuka, a teen genius professor, it might be because an increasing number of humans are becoming possessed by demons.  He’s come up with a plan, though.  Ryo theorizes that by allowing oneself to be voluntarily possessed, a human of sufficient will can retain their human mind while gaining demonic powers.  And he has just the candidate in mind, his best friend, the wimpy but truly good-hearted Akira Fudo.

Devilman Crybaby

The plan involves infiltrating a “Sabbat”, a wild party where people engage in mind altering drugs, illicit sex and blasphemous dancing.  With a violent push by Ryo, the balance is tipped and demons begin possessing the partiers.  Akira is able to merge with the particularly powerful demon Amon, but retain his humanity.  He distinguishes himself from those fully taken over as not a demon, but a “Devilman.”  Now Ryo and his foster family the Makimuras (particularly his lovely foster sister Miki) become the target of demons bent on returning Amon to the fold or killing him.

This new Netflix animated series is based on the 1972 manga Devilman by Go Nagai.   Unlike the 1970s anime adaptation, which was considerably toned down for television (but still gave small children screaming nightmares), this horror show mostly follows the plot progression of the manga, including its legendarily apocalyptic ending.  It also takes advantage of not being for broadcast to go for a Mature Viewers audience, with nudity, sex, rape, gore aplenty, cruelty to animals and general nastiness.

It also does a good job of updating the setting for the current day.  A gang of delinquents in the Seventies style is replaced by rapper fans (at least one of whom is a skilled rapper himself), and social media plays a large part in certain events.  A weird touch is that some version of the Seventies cartoon exists in the backstory, causing people to dismiss reports of Devilman as other people watching too much anime.

The title refers to another change–in this version, Akira is empathetic to the point that he can sense other people’s sorrow, and cries in sympathy with them, even retaining this trait in his Devilman identity.  This makes it clearer that despite some personality changes, he’s still the same person.

Go Nagai intended the manga as a metaphor for how war destroys everything and twists human hearts.  And indeed, in many cases, the humans live down to the worst demons.  But there are exceptions, and even some characters who are initially unsympathetic show redeeming moments.

The art style and animation work very well for the type of story that’s being told, and there’s some stirring music.

Highly recommended for adults with strong stomachs and an interest in horror.

And here’s the trailer!  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ww06yGPM7Kc

Comic Book Review: The Drained Brains Caper

Comic Book Review: The Drained Brains Caper written by Trina Robbins, art by Tyler Page

Megan Yamamura wants a pet. Unfortunately, the young poet’s (she specializes in haiku) father is allergic to all fur-bearing animals, so she’s thinking maybe a tarantula, which is fuzzy but not furry might be the best bet.

The Drained Brains Caper

She’s been looking all over her new city of Chicagoland and having no luck when she comes into the pet supply store Raf Hernandez is manning the counter of. The young computer whiz is helping out his mother, but the store’s policy is clear–they sell pet supplies, not animals.

Megan has other problems. One of the reasons her family had to move was because she’d been expelled from her old school (a total overreaction to a minor offense) and she now has to spend the summer at Stepford Academy. The students and teachers there are all smiling zombies, and the meat-laden school lunches (anathema to vegetarian Megan) have unusual effects if overeaten.

Raf is the only person her age she kind of knows in the neighborhood, so she has to turn to him when her father ignores the warning signs that something’s not right at Stepford Academy. (In the tradition of middle-school stories, Mr. Yamamura is totally oblivious to what Megan tells him and only listens to other adults.) The kids are soon joined by Bradley, a talking dog, and must stop the mad scientist, Dr. Vorschak, before she can bring the entire city under her sway.

This is the first volume in the Chicagoland Detective Agency series of children’s graphic novels. Trina Robbins is a long-time comics creator, and her writing here is decent if perhaps a bit shortcut-heavy. There’s not much mystery here, but then the detective agency hasn’t been formed yet. The detective himself doesn’t come in until halfway through, and he just happens to have known what was going on all along.

The city of Chicagoland is about 90% Chicago (it has the El and the Cubs), but presumably isn’t just Chicago so that the creative team can shove any odd buildings or fictional organizations they want in.

There’s some slapstick violence, and Dr. Vorschak engages in unethical animal testing as well as unethical human testing. But in general, this should be suitable for middle-school readers.

Recommended to fans of things like the Scooby-Doo cartoons.

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