Book Review: The Ferguson Rifle

Book Review: The Ferguson Rifle by Louis L’Amour

My name is Ronan Chantry, and I am alone upon this land.

He is a scholar and a gentleman, but Ronan Chantry was raised in the wilderness, hunting, trapping and tracking.  Now that his wife and son have died in a fire, and pursued by the reputation of killing a man in a duel, Chantry returns to the wilderness.  He does not remain alone for long, joining a small band of men also going into the West to try their hand at fur trapping.

The Ferguson Rifle

Their camp is nearly raided by allies of a treacherous Native American guide; but some time later the group makes friends with the Cheyenne, while trying to evade Spanish soldiers who have not yet gotten word that the Louisiana Purchase has gone through.  Then Ronan stumbles across Lucinda Falvey, whose father was murdered for the secret of a lost treasure.

The murderer and his minions have pursued Lucinda into the Dakota Territory, and turns out to have connections to both Lucinda and Ronan’s pasts.  Chantry and his allies must evade the killers, find the treasure and get the woman to safety–perhaps an eccentric mountain man has the key to survival?

This is the first novel written in the Chantry family saga by all-time great Western writer Louis L’Amour.  (But the last in internal chronology.)  The title comes from Chantry’s signature weapon, a firearm given to him by Major Ferguson himself.  It’s a customized prototype without the weakness in the lock mortise.  Since the story is set about the time of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, a rapid-firing breechloader is a formidable advantage.

This is a fast-moving story with clear but often evocative use of language; not a lot of time is spent on characterization, with bad man Rafen Falvey getting the bulk of what depth there is.  Chantry is not just smart and well-educated, but wilderness-savvy and skilled at all forms of combat he turns his hand to.  His one weakness is prideful anger, which led him into the fatal duel, and into the knock-down drag-out fistfight that is the climax of the book.  The use of coincidence to drive certain story elements does come close to breaking suspension of disbelief.

Recommended to Western fans, and those looking for a good manly adventure story.

Book Review: The Quick and the Dead

Book Review: The Quick and the Dead by Louis L’Amour

When Duncan McKaskel and his wife Susanna decided to move out West with their young son Tom to homestead, they knew there would be dangers and difficulties.  But after their wagon train falls to cholera and the family strikes out on its own, they learn that the pioneer trail has deadlier dangers than anyone ever told them.  In particular, the family runs afoul of a gang of horse thieves.  One of the thieves winds up dead, and the remainder pursue the family.

The Quick and the Dead

You’d think it was a stroke of good fortune that the McKaskels came across Con Vallian, a drifter with detailed knowledge of the plains, who decides to help them along.  Except that Duncan is unsure of Con’s motives…the man seems unduly impressed with Susanna’s good looks.  Are they more in danger from their hunters, or from the man inside their camp?

Louis L’Amour (1908-1988) was one of America’s most popular writers of Western fiction, with 86 novels to his name.  This volume is considered one of his best, and was made into a movie in  1987.

There’s little wasted wordage in this book.  It gallops right along as the long chase continues.  The characterization is sparse; the mystery of Con Vallian’s motivation is not entirely cleared up when the viewpoint switches to him.  Does he have a creepy desire to steal Susanna away from Duncan, or is he just unfamiliar with tactful ways of complimenting a woman?  We can’t be sure for most of the book.

Most of the horse thief gang is clearer about their motivations, but we don’t learn much of their depths.  Some are not as bad as they could be, some just as horrible as advertised, and one (“The Huron”) is a mystery whose thought processes are unknown to the rest of the gang.  Their pursuit gives a tension to the story, even when they are not physically present.

Which brings me to the Native Americans.  An Arapaho hunting party make several appearances in the story, as a possible threat or potential allies.  Con says, “Injuns think different than us, but that doesn’t say they are wrong…just different.”  It’s a fair enough assessment for the time period.

The ending may seem a bit off if you were expecting the last man standing to finish the hunt, but it makes sense with the characters as established.

As expected from the title, there is a lot of violent death in the story.  Otherwise it should be suitable for junior high readers on up.  The 2011 paperback edition I read has a short biography of Mr. L’Amour, and some maps that help place the action.

Recommended to fans of classic Westerns.

Here’s a trailer for the movie version–be aware that the book has no shower scene.

Manga Review: Captain Ken 1 &2

Manga Review: Captain Ken 1 & 2 by Osamu Tezuka

Mamoru Hoshino lives on his family ranch on Mars near the town of Hedes.  Life in a backwater frontier town can get a bit stale, so he’s excited when he learns a distant relative, Kenn Minakami, is coming from Earth to live with them.   On the way to the spaceport, Mamoru runs into a gunslinger calling himself “Captain Ken.”  Although a boy no older than Mamoru himself, Ken is a skilled combatant and saves Mamoru’s life from an ambush.

Captain Ken

Realizing that he’s too late to get to the spaceport, Mamoru returns home to find that Kenn Minakami, a lovely girl, has just arrived.  Mamoru is shocked to discover that aside from the obvious, Ken and Kenn look exactly alike.  He begins to suspect that they’re the same person, but other problems become more pressing.

This 1960 manga series by Osamu Tezuka took the concept of a “space western” and ran with it.  In the backstory, the first human settlers on Mars were Americans, who noted the terrain’s resemblance to the legendary Wild West.  They promptly adopted Western garb and customs, as well as building robot horses to ride as wheeled vehicles were not suitable except in built-up areas.  Other countries’ immigrants more or less assimilated into that culture, except the Russians.

Unfortunately, another part of American history repeated itself as the Earthlings stole land from the native Martians and broke treaties with them, pushing them into the worst land, ever shrinking as the humans multiplied.

Captain Ken’s mission is a bit nebulous at first, although he does try to protect the natives from oppression by evil Earthlings.  Tezuka was well aware that most of the readers would have read Princess Knight (originally Ribon no Kishi) and would think he was repeating the trick of having a girl impersonate a boy or vice versa.  For most of the first volume, he makes sure no one ever sees Ken and Kenn together, and has them both engage in odd behavior that would make sense if they were the same person.   The real explanation turns out to be way weirder.

Captain Ken eventually decides to learn “Martian Shooting Style” which is actually only usable by people born under the heavier gravity of Earth.  This is important, as the deadly gunfighter Lamp knows the style and is loyal to the villains.  Everything climaxes as the Martians reveal they’ve been stockpiling weapons for years, and are now ready to kick all the aliens off Mars.  The ending is bittersweet.

This is very much a boys’ adventure series, with women relegated to minor roles (Kenn is more important as a motivation than as someone with agency.)  While this is a children’s story, Mr. Tezuka does not hold back on the violent action, and several people die.  (The story wobbles on whether Ken’s gun shoots lethal bullets.)  Sensitive readers may find it too intense.  There’s also a person who is dying of radiation poisoning, clearly inspired by Hiroshima survivors.

Parents of young readers may want to discuss the treatment of Native Americans, whether using guns is the best way to resolve problems, and perhaps the atomic bomb with their children.

This isn’t Tezuka’s best work, but it’s still well-written fun with his cartoony art.  Recommended to Tezuka fans, space western fans, and boys at heart.

Book Review: Cowman’s Jack-Pot

Book Review: Cowman’s Jack-Pot by Frank C. Robertson (Also published as Greener Grows the Grass)

Chet Calder has spent eight years in the East.  Now the death of his father Dave Calder, and the crash of the stock market mean that there’s nothing left but the DC ranch.   On the stage into Calder City, Chet is seated by Mr. Doljack, the local banker.  Mr. Doljack reports that even the ranch itself is in dire financial straits, but it can be saved by ending the feud with the Murtaugh family and their Block M ranch by leasing some prime grazing land to them.

Cowman's Jackpot

Chet distrusts Mr. Doljack, who only owns the bank by virtue of having married the previous owner’s daughter.   But then who should just happen to be taking the Calder City stagecoach but Sylvia and Esta, the Murtaugh twins, who have filled out very nicely since Chet’s been away.  They are quite charming, and Chet begins to think it might not be so bad to end the feud after all.

Frank Chester Robertson (1890-1969) was a noted writer of Western novels (150 novels! plus many short stories and articles.)  This 1942 book is a good example of his craft.

Unlike many Westerns in which the protagonist is an upstanding fellow from the beginning, Chet Calder is initially a heel.  He has been away so long because he quarreled with his father over a gold-digging woman, only to have her throw him over when Dave wrote her a check.   Since then he’s been a “sportsman”, living off his father’s money while doing nothing to earn his own way or improve himself.  The Nineteenth Century equivalent of sitting around in your underwear all day playing video games, but with better chances of scoring women.

His financial circumstances having forced him to come back to the Idaho Territory irks Chet, and he treats his father’s old hands like servants, and his pride makes him snide to girl next door Marcia Whitman, who Mr. Doljack has informed him has become greedy.  None of the DC Ranch people are happy that Chet plans to make nice with the Murtaugh clan and hold a lavish party for the enemy ranchers.

Only after Chet has managed to alienate most of the people who should be his allies, while winning over none of his enemies, does he realize that he was set up from the start.  Now he has to start digging himself out of the hole he made.

Other than Chet, the lines of good and evil are pretty clearly drawn.  The Murtaughs have been poisoned by their upbringing and the long feud.  (And in an unpleasantly racist moment, the narration blames some of their evil on being of part-Cree heritage.)  One of them kills a cat just to drive home that he’s a bad’un.  Mr. Doljack is greedy and amoral (and lives in fear of his supposedly grotesquely ugly wife, who we never meet), and the other co-conspirators aren’t much better.

While the Murtaughs just want to make their Block M ranch prosperous and stick it to Chet, the other baddies are more interested in huge phosphate deposits Marcia’s father found on the DC land.  A decade before, those deposits had been unimportant, but with technological and infrastructure advancements, they’re worth millions.  Mr. Doljack is determined to get control of the mineral rights before Chet can find out their true value.

The primary weakness of the forces arrayed against Chet Calder is that their differing motivations and willingness to maneuver against each other to gain advantage or advance their own endgame results in some backstabbing that Chet can take advantage of.

Mr. Robertson has a tendency to repeat information he’s already established, and cheats a bit at the end to make sure that our heroes triumph without actually having to kill anyone.   But still, this is a nice old-fashioned Western tale for those who prefer their stories in black and white.  The last reprint appears to have been in the 1970s so good luck finding a copy.

Book Review: Peril by Ponytail

Book Review: Peril by Ponytail by Nancy J Cohen

Disclaimer:  I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway on the premise that I would review it.  No other compensation was involved.  Also, this is an advance uncorrected proof, and there will be some changes in the final product.  (Such as fixing the typo on the very first page of the story.)

Peril by Ponytail

Marla Vail, hair salon proprietor, and her new husband Dalton Vail, a homicide detective, are on a belated honeymoon.   Dalton’s Uncle Raymond owns a dude ranch in Arizona, and is developing a ghost town as a tourist attraction, so they’re going to spend their vacation there.  But this is a mystery novel, so there’s no rest in store.  A forest ranger has died under suspicious circumstances, and there’s been a spate of supposed accidents at both the ranch and ghost town.

Raymond is pretty sure that another rancher he’s long feuded with is responsible, but Marla’s not so convinced.  Could it be the rebellious daughter; the wranglers with shady pasts–perhaps the ecoterrorists?   The “accidents” become more deadly as the puzzle pieces pile up.

This is the twelfth book in the “Bad Hair Day” cozy mystery series.  Marla normally works out of her hair salon in Southern Florida and uses her knowledge of hair care to help solve crimes.   She’s a bit out of her element here; the flat landscape of her home has not prepared Marla for a case that involves lots of hill and rock climbing, and she’s not a young woman.   She does spot a hair-related clue early on, but doesn’t really follow up on it, and the savvy reader will solve that part of the mystery many chapters ahead of the reveal.

One thing that irritated me as a fan of “fair play” mysteries is that ghosts and psychics are treated as valid (if frustratingly vague) sources of information; unless it’s a “one weird thing” story, the supernatural has no place in cozies.   I was also baffled by the absence of right wing/libertarian loonies from the list of possible threats given by the local sheriff.  The ecoterrorists are more germane to the plot, true, but the former have been in the news more recently in the Southwest.

The character byplay is pretty good, with Marla and Dalton having an active sex life just off camera.   There is quite a bit of family drama that screens the actual solution to the mystery as various members conceal useful information.

Perhaps in deference to the Western setting, the ending involves rather more gun play than one would expect from a cozy, nearly up to hard-boiled levels.

This is a light mystery suitable for vacation reading that’s not too challenging.

Book Review: Aeroplane Boys on a Cattle Ranch

Book Review: Aeroplane Boys on a Cattle Ranch by John Luther Langworthy

Construction on the new high school is going slowly, so classes won’t start for another two months.   Don’t worry, cousins Frank and Andy Bird will not be bored.   It seems the two young aviators have been invited to spend their extra vacation with Andy’s maternal uncle, Jethro Witherspoon, down on his Arizona ranch.  So they pack up their flying machine and it’s off to the sunny Southwest!

Aeroplane Boys on a Cattle Ranch

The flying’s fine near the desert, despite a couple of attempts by the Bird boys’ old nemesis, Percy Carberry, to put an end to the fun.  The boys get to meet real live cowboys, participate in a bear hunt, and cap it off by using their aeroplane to track down a kidnapper!

This is the fifth in the Aeroplane Boys series (also printed as the Bird Boys series,) and the oldest of the air adventure books I’ve reviewed at publication date 1914.   It’s pretty standard stuff for children’s literature of the time, with our heroes being gallant young men (Frank cooler-headed than Andy) who excite the admiration of all good people with their piloting skills.  Percy Carberry gets no dialogue, but is behind the scenes of ineffectual attempts to wreck our heroes’ plane.  As was also standard for the time, Percy has more money than sense from an indulgent parent, but can’t buy competence.

The writing’s decent, and there are exciting bits.  It really is fascinating to imagine one of the fragile aircraft of the time desperately searching the desert for a fugitive and his tiny captive.  Parents should be aware that there’s some period ethnic prejudice (against Mexicans) and racism (against Native Americans) in the story towards the conclusion.

One interesting thing in hindsight is that our high school aged cousins undoubtedly graduated just in time to fly in World War One–had the series continued.

At least one of the earlier volumes is on Project Gutenberg, for fans of early aviation.  (In the back of this volume, I see there was also a Girl Aviators series; go, suffragettes!)

Magazine Review: High Adventure #127: Masked Rider Western

Magazine Review: High Adventure #127: Masked Rider Western edited by John P. Gunnison

High Adventure is a pulp reprint magazine, reprinting stories (and sometimes whole issues) from the adventure magazines of the 1930s and 1940s.  They switch up so that no two consecutive issues are the same subject, although certain character series recur frequently.  In this issue, it’s stories from Masked Rider Western in 1944-45.

High Adventure #127

The Masked Rider (no relation to the Japanese Kamen Rider) was a fairly transparent copy of the Lone Ranger.  He too wandered the Old West in a mask with his faithful Native American companion, fighting crime and saving the innocent.  Unlike his model, however, the Masked Rider will shoot to kill when he feels it necessary.  He’s also rougher of language, and will smoke and drink a bit while in disguise.

That disguise is Wayne Morgan, wandering cowpuncher; while only the Yaqui brave Blue Hawk knows that the Masked Rider and Wayne Morgan are the same person, even he does not know the Masked Rider’s true identity.  Mind, since Wayne is a two-fisted paladin of justice himself, it isn’t much of a disguise.  The two sides of our hero spend a lot of time repeating what the other person supposedly told them.

The two Masked Rider stories bookend the magazine.  “Dead Man’s Ranch” by Larry A. Harris begins with a man named Bill Maitland escaping prison in Mexico.  He soon reunites with his wife, and the son he has never seen.  They then light out for Texas, so that Bill can claim some hidden gold, and seek revenge on the brother who framed him all those years ago.   As they’re crossing the Rio Grande, however, the treacherous ferryman murders Bill and his wife.  The Masked Rider saves the son.

The Rider is in Diablo Basin on a seemingly unrelated matter, a war between the local cattle ranchers, and a bunch of nesters led by the fanatical Jeremiah Pearson.  The mysterious Vigilantes might belong to either of the feuding parties, or work for a third force.  Add in a lawyer who seems to be buying up water rights, and a pair of starcrossed lovers, and the situation is dynamite!

To be honest, I found this story needlessly complicated, the pieces stuck together with bits hanging out to make it more difficult to resolve.  As a result, the ending seems forced, and some characters nothing but red herrings.

“War in Massacre Basin” by Charles N. Hecklemann finds the Masked Rider in the appropriately-named area looking into the supposedly accidental death of an old friend.  The most likely suspect for that and other killings is a land-grabbing rancher named Daken, but the Rider soon finds himself at a loss when Daken is murdered, apparently by new villain in town Pegleg Boeing.

This story works in its complications much better, I think.  It makes sense that a man as vile as Daken would have made enemies elsewhere.  And much of the difficulty in solving the case comes from the very sensible suspicions of one of the ranchers about people who go about in masks.

“Judge Colt’s Clerk” by Oscar J. Friend features a law clerk in a corrupt county who’s managed to bring in a ringer judge.  Short and sweet.

“Hangrope Reprieve” by Gunnison Steele (probably a pen name) is about a man on the run for a crime he did commit, but it was self defense.  He stops at a saloon for a quick meal, but soon finds himself defending a young woman….  Adequate of its kind.

“Texas John Alden” is by Robert E. Howard writing as Patrick Ervin.  Those more familiar with Mr. Howard’s Conan stories may find the humorous tale of a cowpoke attempting to fetch another fellow’s bride from a hostile town a little offputting.  Especially as Breck Elkins cheerfully kills and beats his way across the landscape.  Essentially, he’s a Howard barbarian hero played for laughs.  The Western dialect is thick in this one.

I don’t read nearly enough old-fashioned Westerns, so this issue was a treat.  People as don’t like Westerns should skip it.

 

Comic Book Review: The Sixth Gun Book 1: Cold Dead Fingers

Comic Book Review: The Sixth Gun Book 1: Cold Dead Fingers written by Cullen Bunn, illustrated by Brian Hurtt

Becky Montcrief’s stepfather is dying.  But the men who’ve come to their remote homestead aren’t willing to wait for him to finish.  It seems he’s been hiding a gun all these years, and they want it enough to kill for it.   In the heat of the moment after her Pa’s death, Becky grabs the gun and uses it.  This means the owlhoots now can’t take it until she’s dead, so they take her to their boss.

The Sixth Gun Book 1

Meanwhile, a man named Drake Sinclair is also looking for that gun, and he is no saint either.  He’s a step behind the owlhoots, and has to enter the enemy’s lair to retrieve the gun, and while he’s at it Becky.  It turns out her gun is one of a set of six, each with an eerie power,  which used to be owned by an insane Confederate general and his henchmen.  General Hume is dead, but he’s getting better, and he wants his gun back, no matter who stands in the way.

Soon Becky, Drake and Drake’s partner, gambler Billjohn O’Henry, are being chased down by Hume’s ghastly army.  But Becky’s gun is showing her things she’d rather not see, such as Drake’s dark past, and General Hume’s plans once he gets all six guns.

This series is a hybrid of Western action and horror, which meshes pretty well, all things considered.  The various powers of the guns, and the other supernatural occurrences, make for some great visuals.  The immediate threat is dealt with by the end of this volume, but enough plot threads are kept dangling to keep the story going strong.  (The artist told me the final volume should be out sometime next year.)

Becky is a bit naive at the beginning of the story, but soon becomes a survivor (it helps that her Pa taught her how to shoot.)  Drake’s character development is told mostly in flashback, he once willingly served Hume, but is a somewhat better man these days.  The bad guys are perhaps a little one-note, but part of the theme of the story is that they have been warped by their weapons, losing the parts of their original personalities that don’t involve killing people.

Given the genres, there’s a lot of gruesome violence and body horror.  At one point, there’s a technically naked woman, but she’s so drenched in blood that nothing shows.  Surprisingly little cussing, and some mild period sexism.  I’d say suitable for senior high students and up, maybe a bit younger for fans with morbid tastes.

Fans of the Jonah Hex series (especially the more outre storylines) and the works of Joe R. Lansdale should find this entertaining.

 

Movie Review: The Miracle Rider

Movie Review: The Miracle Rider

It is 1935 in the Panhandle area of Texas, home to the Ravenhead Tribe Indian Reservation.    The Ravenheads are a peaceful, hardworking tribe.  Sadly, their land is secretly situated on top of the largest deposit of X-94, an ore with tremendous explosive power, in the world.  Somehow, a white man named Zaroff (Charles Middleton) has learned of this and has been secretly mining the X-94 while posing as an oil driller and ranch owner.

The Miracle Rider

If Zaroff could just get the Ravenheads out of the reservation, he could move in openly and become the most powerful mine owner in the world.  To this end, Zaroff tries to scare the natives off their land with a string of bizarre incidents attributed to the evil Firebird spirit.  He is aided in this by one of the tribe, Longboat (Bob Kortman).  It seems that Longboat is not full-blooded, and if this secret was known to the tribe, he could never become chief.

Good thing Texas Ranger Tom Morgan (Tom Mix) is on the case!  A long-time friend of the Ravenheads since his father died protecting them from squatters, Tom is swift to realize that the events are not supernatural.  He acts to protect Ruth (Joan Gale), a murdered chief’s daughter, while investigating the conspiracy.

Early on, Tom is misled into believing Emil Janss (Edward Hern),  a merchant who wants to sell some unprofitable land he owns to the government for a new reservation, is behind the attacks and killings.  Can Tom unravel the tangled web to reveal the truth before the Ravenheads lose their homes?

The Miracle Rider is a fifteen-part movie serial produced by Mascot Pictures in 1935.  It was the last film work by Tom Mix.  While he was still a big box office draw, as he had been in the silent era, Mr. Mix was getting long in the tooth and had nagging injuries that slowed him down.  He still did many of his own stunts in this serial, but you can see him moving stiffly from time to time.

While there are science fiction elements in the story, they swiftly fade out.  The solar-powered heat ray is never used again after the first installment, and the Firebird, a radio-controlled ultralight aircraft, is destroyed only a few episodes in.  That leaves only X-94 itself, and the explosions never live up to the scale the dialogue says they should.  On the other hand, the Western genre bits stay all the way, and there’s plenty of exciting horse chases, gunplay and fistfights.

Typical of its era, the treatment of Native Americans is dubious at best.  The first installment opens with American heroes Daniel Boone, Davy Crockett and Buffalo Bill Cody trying to honor Indian territory, only to have greedier white men go and steal the land anyway, leading to war.  Tom Morgan’s father is cast in this mold as well, and it’s clear that Tom is meant to be the spiritual successor of the other heroes.

Tom and the good guy Indian agent Christopher Adams (Edward Earle) behave as paternalistic protectors of the Ravenheads, who are superstitious, easily panicked and speak (except Ruth) in a vaudeville “Injun” dialect.  Naturally, all of the Ravenheads with major speaking parts are played by white actors in makeup.  Longboat is referred to as a “half-breed” and this is the major motivation for his villainous actions.

But still, there’s some rollicking action, a bunch of plot twists, and a couple of good cliffhangers (even if a couple have resolutions that are obvious cheats.)  The antics of Tony, Tom’s preternaturally intelligent horse, are a hoot.  Watch it with your kids, but prepare for some rather pointed questions afterwards.

Movie Review: Union Pacific (1939)

Movie Review: Union Pacific (1939)

The Civil War might still be going on, but the United States has to consider what will happen after the war.   Government approval is given to build railways that will link the eastern half of the country with the western,   The eastern end of the line is being built by the Union Pacific railroad company, while the Central Pacific company is heading east from California.

Union Pacific

A financial speculator, Asa Barrows (Henry Kolker), has a plan to manipulate the Union Pacific’s stock to his profit by delaying the completion of the line.  To this end, he hires Sid Campeau (Brian Donlevy) to run a saloon/gambling hall/bordello that will travel along with the construction, getting the workers drunk, disorderly and perpetually broke.  He also authorizes Campeau to take any other measures necessary to delay the line.

Several years later, the Union Pacific construction is way behind schedule, and the company brings on troubleshooter Jeff Butler (Joel McCrea), a former Union captain and engineer to see if he can’t speed things up.    To Jeff’s surprise, Campeau’s right hand man is his old war buddy Dick Allen (Robert Preston), who’s turned professional gambler.  Dick is wooing the lovely Mollie Monahan (Barbara Stanwyck), whose rolling office serves as post office and tea shop for the railroad laborers.

Mollie takes a shine to Jeff, but is frustrated by his apparent failure to catch on to her interest.   He’s far too busy trying to shut down Campeau’s operation with the aid of his comic relief sidekicks Fiesta (Akim Tamiroff) and Leach Overmile (Lynne Overman.)

Barrows is pressured into loaning the Union Pacific money so that they can meet a delayed payroll.  He orders Campeau to make sure that the payroll does not arrive, and the vice lord has Dick pull off the train robbery.    Sadly, the job does not go smoothly, and a guard is killed.

Some convoluted circumstances later, Campeau’s gambling hall is permanently shut down and the payroll money returned.  However, to cover his part in the robbery, Dick has pressured Mollie into marrying him, only to find out that’s not going to help, and he must flee.

A little later, a train carrying Jeff, Mollie and (secretly) Dick is ambushed by Indians.  All but those three die before the Army can come and rescue them.  In recognition of Dick’s courage and assistance, and their old friendship, Jeff allows him to leave peacefully, and in return Dick tells Jeff of Barrows’ treachery.

More excitement later, the two rail lines meet at Promontory Summit, and the final act unfolds.

Yep, it’s another Cecil B. DeMille epic, this time a Western.   Along with Stagecoach, it’s credited with elevating the Western to A-movie status from its usual B-movie roots.  It also reflects the growing desire of Hollywood in the late 1930s to unite the country symbolically.  This theme is foregrounded in the opening title card, and brought back at the end by the image of a modern train on the Union Pacific tracks.

As always with DeMille, it’s a big, exciting movie, though much less bawdy than some of the others I’ve reviewed.  The saloon girls are barely in the movie, and never do anything more suggestive than ask Jeff if he’s lonely.

Plenty of gun fighting and fist fighting though, and a couple of exciting train crashes.

There’s a bit of DeMille’s usual religious theme; Mollie deliberately removes her cross when she feels forced to lie, and prays for people’s safety.  The hasty wedding is Catholic, and she feels bound by it.  She’s a feisty lass, but sidelined after the Indian attack.

An older Irish woman reveals that she had a child that morning, and is already back at work because her husband certainly wasn’t going to be helping out.

The Native Americans are not communicated with, shown as bloodthirsty and baffled by the things of civilization.  Jeff objects to one being shot early on because it will lead to white deaths, not because he’s a human being and it’s murder.  Fiesta is a comical Mexican stereotype, but has the advantage of being a superb whip handler; and partnered with the Southern stereotype of Leach.  (“The last time I saw General Grant, I was lying in a patch of blackberries, taking aim at him.”)

The racism and dubious history aside, this is another blockbuster movie worth looking into.

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